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What A Difference A Year Makes!


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 09:26 AM

It is surely too early to say the drought is over in Iowa.

But with two weeks left of official winter, things are looking better.

Last year we only got 20" total snowfall in Central iowa.

This Year we are already over 40" and that tops the totals for each of the last 3 yrs.

My snow removal has gone from a JD318 with a blower to a Ford 1500 Compact with a 6 ft rear blade.

And it is handling the 1/4 mile of gravel lane and 200 ft of asphalt with ease.

This is the 3rd year on this place, and the first year I would have been out of luck if my brother had not saved me on 3 occasions by pushing out the gravel with his Ford Explorer and Meyers Snow Blade.

 

The next big item on my List is a small 4X4 pickup(Toyota, Ranger, or even a Jeep Wrangler etc) with a snow blade. While the tractor does very well, there is no protection from the wind. And out here on the plains it is a rare day there is no wind and as I get older I can't take the wind like I used to. A Beater with a Heater would get me out of the wind.


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 07, 2013 - 09:38 AM.

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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 09:58 AM

You may find that an older full size 4 x 4 with a plow is cheaper. That seems to be the case around here. I'd prefer the older and bigger because the little ones seem to end up with more frame problems. I'm planning on having a cab on my tractor for next year. Good Luck, Rick

 

What is your normal snowfall?

 

Do you have to maintain a 1/4 mile of road? Maybe a dump truck would help.

 

Will this cab fit your tractor?   https://www.surplusc...p?Item=1-3965-A


Edited by boyscout862, March 07, 2013 - 10:21 AM.

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#3 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 10:29 AM

... Maybe a dump truck would help. ...

 

If you can't be part of the problem, try to be part of the cause! I don't think my spouse would take kindly to one of my friends recommending I buy a dump truck.  Might be the last time I see him. :D 


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#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 10:46 AM

You may find that an older full size 4 x 4 with a plow is cheaper. That seems to be the case around here. I'd prefer the older and bigger because the little ones seem to end up with more frame problems. I'm planning on having a cab on my tractor for next year. Good Luck, Rick

 

What is your normal snowfall?

 

Do you have to maintain a 1/4 mile of road? Maybe a dump truck would help.

 

Will this cab fit your tractor?   https://www.surplusc...p?Item=1-3965-A

Now your throwing Gasoline on a Brush Fire! I would love to have a dump truck! But the compromises puzzle me. One big enough to really haul enough to be much use (Its 18 miles to the nearest limestone pit and the Gravel pit is 12 miles) would require a CDL. That and licensing. insurance and maintainence, exceeds my ability to justify it. Believe me I have crunched the numbers into powder.

I think I would be better off having a hauler deliver and then spread with my tractor.

 That being said, I have big ideas about fitting a dump hoist under whatever plow truck I get for the smaller jobs.

And yes the 1/4 mile dead end road is not maintained by the county so responsibility is mine and 1 neighbor.  The Deed & Abstract states clearly when the property/farm was subdivided in 1968 that the county would assume no resposibility for maintanence.


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 07, 2013 - 10:56 AM.

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#5 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 11:27 AM

Wisdom come with age-how true it is.

 

 

Dick


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#6 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 11:50 AM

I look at projects as a means to justify toys. My wife is very understanding about this(her father taught her well). I built my house mostly just my wife and myself. I was able to justify 3 dump trucks(not running), a shoveldozer, a TLB, farm tractor w/ FEL & 3ph, two screaning plants, and a lot of tools to fix them. Everything had paid for themselves by the time we moved in. Since they don't owe me anything, I got to keep them. I picked up a 56 Chevy 2 ton Dump for $300. It cost about $50 to get it running and use it as a yard truck. I picked up a plow for free, but its too big for my driveway. I'm recomending that you both just keep your eyes open and be flexible to opportunities. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, March 08, 2013 - 11:40 AM.


#7 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 12:54 PM

Wow! A screening plant is not something I had ever considered as a homeowners project?

I have had a lot of ideas on how to make a mere 9 acres profitable. And Compost production was one. A screening plant might be a useful addition? All the plants I have ever been around were the huge ones used at the pits and quarries.


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#8 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2013 - 01:32 PM

Wow! A screening plant is not something I had ever considered as a homeowners project?

I have had a lot of ideas on how to make a mere 9 acres profitable. And Compost production was one. A screening plant might be a useful addition? All the plants I have ever been around were the huge ones used at the pits and quarries.

 

I bought a large portable and a small portable. They could be pulled behind a truck. They ended up being more trouble than they were worth. I ended up building a grissley and hanging it from 2 trees. I screaned over 5000 cy of soil. If you have to do alot to your soil then you can justify a dump truck and a bucket loader. Set a screen up so that the tailings go into the truck and you can take them away. Collect a bunch of old rebar to use for the screen, some channel for the frame, some big pipes for legs, and a welder to put it all together. I spent 40 hours welding up mine but it was worth it. 

 

Read the old Mother Earth Magazines for ideas on how to make 9 acres self sufficient. Good Luck, Rick


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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 09:09 AM

After looking up a Grizzley and now knowing what it is, that would be doable. Where I'm located in Iowa, there was very little Glacial drift in this area. So I don't have rock in the sol to deal with. I think in my 7000 sq ft garden I only found about 10 rocks.

My problem is that when they built the access road they dozed a lot of the topsoil off to fill about 50 ftdeep across the waterway from hill top to hilltop about 800 ft long. Then it was planted in corn for many years and the soil is pretty well worn out.

I need to build up the soil on that 7 acres.



#10 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 11:43 AM

Have you looked at growing a legume such as soy beans? They actually can make the soil more fertile. I hope to do a small area of them this year to build my soil and to try making biodiesel. Good Luck, Rick



#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 02:28 PM

Not soybeans but they would help. It's hardly a big enough area to get a combine to come out and harvest.

I did sow Dutch White Clover and it should help some. I have been reading up  on Hazel nut production and am watching for markets to open up in the area.  The native Hazel to Iowa is supose to be blight resistant which is an issue threateneing the groves in the NW part of the country.


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 08, 2013 - 02:30 PM.

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#12 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 04:55 PM

I think I would be better off having a hauler deliver and then spread with my tractor.

 That being said, I have big ideas about fitting a dump hoist under whatever plow truck I get for the smaller jobs.

 

 

OK, now that I'm not quoting my own words.  JD, I bought a bit of gravel last fall and thought I might have to spread it.  To my surprise, the truck drove down my road and dumped the gravel out as he moved, resulting in a fairly even coat of gravel where he went.  I did do some finish work, but really didn't have too do that much.  Have you checked to see if your local hauler with spread with delivery?


Edited by HowardsMF155, March 08, 2013 - 04:59 PM.

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#13 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 06:29 PM

OK, now that I'm not quoting my own words.  JD, I bought a bit of gravel last fall and thought I might have to spread it.  To my surprise, the truck drove down my road and dumped the gravel out as he moved, resulting in a fairly even coat of gravel where he went.  I did do some finish work, but really didn't have too do that much.  Have you checked to see if your local hauler with spread with delivery?

OK, now that I'm not quoting my own words.  JD, I bought a bit of gravel last fall and thought I might have to spread it.  To my surprise, the truck drove down my road and dumped the gravel out as he moved, resulting in a fairly even coat of gravel where he went.  I did do some finish work, but really didn't have too do that much.  Have you checked to see if your local hauler with spread with delivery?

Yeah the last load I had delivered at my old place, the driver spread it off the truck. He was limited since it was in town and the neighbors calbe tv line ran over my drive. I had my brother bring over his bobcat 610 to finish the job.
Most of those guys are real good at putting it right where you want it. The quarry and pit closest to me either have trucks or have contractors that do this all day everyday and get into the darndest places with a load and will do pretty much what you want.
Honestly they do not charge that much when you consider wht they have invested in a truck, so I really do not mind paying if I have the money.
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