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Got Another Propane Tank To Build A Loader Bucket

ford/jacobsen implements loader bucket

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#1 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 03:26 PM

Good Afternoon All:

 

Ever since seeing the loader bucket built by TAHOE http://gardentractor...nd-dump-bucket/, I've been itching to build one. 

 

So far I have acquired a new still in the box, 2000 lb winch (free), another 100 lb propane tank, which will become the bucket and some steel.

 

Pics to follow.

 

Jeff


Edited by Watchdog, February 27, 2013 - 03:29 PM.


#2 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 03:41 PM

Always wondered about working with tank and torch. They say not to just cut into car gas tanks, so wondering how one does propane? Can it be opened up and set for long time and be of no danger? Gas doesn't get INTO the metal like they say does on car tanks? Would scare me to work with a torch on one. Course if already partially split and open would seem less problem. Even using carbide bits or wheels is sparking and not any safer, wouldn't thnk.  OR.......is this all BS?


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#3 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 04:32 PM

When I first joined my welding class, they where finishing up a large BBQ grill; they used a big propane tank for the main grill part. Before using the plasma cutter to get it open, they purged the tank with argon. Since argon is inert it was safe to cut into the tank.

I am looking forward to following this!
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#4 Arti OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 07:51 PM

I've cut several propane tanks open.. I fill them with water and cut one end off with a sawzall . At that point I feel fairly safe.


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#5 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 08:20 PM

Always wondered about working with tank and torch. They say not to just cut into car gas tanks, so wondering how one does propane? Can it be opened up and set for long time and be of no danger? Gas doesn't get INTO the metal like they say does on car tanks? Would scare me to work with a torch on one. Course if already partially split and open would seem less problem. Even using carbide bits or wheels is sparking and not any safer, wouldn't thnk.  OR.......is this all BS?

 

Let me tell you what I know about propane tanks.  I recertify propane tanks at work and have some formal training.  What I am sharing can be confirmed on line I am sure.

 

Propane, unlike gasoline, has a very low boiling point (-44 degrees celicius).  The key is to unscrew the valve before you do anything else.  Make sure the tank is empty before unthreading.  Remember the low boiling point?  If there is gas left in the tank the valve will come off with force as the gas expands to 270 percent of its volume once it comes in contact with air and the gas will vaporize as it exits the tank and can cause chemical burns and frost bite. 

 

Once the valve is off you have to wait a minimum of 24 hours before cutting into it.  Typically the tanks I use have had the valves removed for months.  When the valve is removed any trace elements of the propane literally boil off and become vapor leaving the tank dry and empty.  For added piece of mind at this point you can fill the tank with water and cut into with an angle grinder (what I use).  I have never used water to cut the tanks, but as I say for your piece of mind.

 

 

Hope this helps.

 

Jeff


Edited by Watchdog, February 28, 2013 - 06:32 AM.

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#6 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 08:29 PM

Here is a picture of a not to scale drawing of my idea for my loader. 

 

347tzll.jpg

 

My drawing is probably raising questions and it would take me two days to type out my explanation, so you'll have to follow along to see how it evolves or comes crashing down...

 

35kiyip.jpg

 

The winch was given to me by a friend who only needed the controller.  I put a wanted ad on kijiji (an on-line site similar to Craigslist) and had a response 10 minutes later.  The fellow who owned it bought a replacement winch and  did not need the controller.  He refused cash for it so I gave him a $10 gift card for Tim Horton's coffee.

 

2m69935.jpg

 

The next cylinder to be reborn into one of my creations.  I have a 40 lb tank that is about to become a charcoal BBQ.

 

More to follow.  I'm looking forward to your comments and input, so don't be shy.

 

Thanks

 

Jeff


Edited by Watchdog, February 27, 2013 - 08:47 PM.

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#7 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 08:39 PM

Looks like a mission with a plan. I'll be watching your progress.
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#8 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2013 - 10:02 PM

I have cut a bijillion propane tanks with no problems. Remove the valves. IF you cant do that then drill a hole in the tank before you begin to cut. Unlike gasoline the propane wont stay inside the tank. If it does it will flare for a second then be gone. I still have both eyebrows to prove it.

'

DO NOT APPLY HEAT UNTIL THERE IS SOME KIND OF HOLE IN THE TANK.


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#9 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2013 - 08:02 PM

Good Evening Gents:

 

I didn't make much progress today, but I did get to the steel shop and picked up a few pieces I needed.  My missus had plans for me today that did not involve working on my tractor. :wallbanging: 

 

With respect to my design, I have decided that I am going to abandon the complicated idea I have drawn above and run with a slightly modified version of Tahoe's set-up (there's a link above).  No point in reinventing the wheel when someone has a simple idea that is proven to work, which is one of the benefits of being a part of the GTT community.

 

My plan is to sneak out into the shop tomorrow before she notices I'm missing, then I'll be too dirty to let back into the house . . . :D

 

Up dates with pics tomorrow.

 

Jeff


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#10 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2013 - 07:12 PM

I got started with assessing what the tractor has to work with. 

 

2irat75.jpg

 

This mounting plate has four threaded holes and a fifth that isn't threaded.  I've been told this is where the factory snow blower would attach.  It's definitely a solid starting point.

 

2ecekqt.jpg

 

I made a template of it by placing a piece of cardboard in front of the mounting plate and tapping around the edge of it with a small ball pein hammer.

 

zthci1.jpg

 

Then I chased the threaded holes out with a tap.

 

218lfp.jpg

 

This piece I picked up to fill in the ends of the bucket.  Hopefully you can see the profile I traced out on it.  It gives me an opening of 15 3/4 inches and makes the bucket more than 14 inches deep.  The overall length will be 36 inches.  Not a big bucket by any means, but should help keep me from overloading the old tractor.

 

I also made a bracket that fits in the front deck mount of the tractor to act as additional bracing.  A friend dropped by and distracted me from taking a picture, so I'll have to add it later.  From that point on, I really didn't make any progress other than coming up with a plan of what to do next.

 

Sorry for the lack of progress.  More to follow soon.

 

Thanks for looking.

 

Jeff


Edited by Watchdog, March 03, 2013 - 07:21 PM.

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#11 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2013 - 07:32 PM

That looks like a good start!


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#12 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 06:51 PM

Good Evening Gents:

 

I suppose I should add ladies, because I know they like their tractors too.  My wife has a newer John Deere riding mower (I don't consider it a tractor at all), but ever since I drove (actually rolled it over) it into the pond I'm not allowed to drive it...now that's a story I should share sometime.  No, it wasn't on purpose and therefore I don't mow the lawn . . . anymore.  If I planned it, then I wouldn't feel like a dumb@$$ for getting all wet.

 

Anyway, I managed to work on a few pieces at work this week and the chore list as assigned by the misses is short.  That list entails reinstalling her central vac (if vacuuming was an olympic sport she would be a gold medalist!) and cutting down a nasty old poplar tree in the back yard.  Having said that I should be out in the shop by 1100 hrs, at the latest . . . 

 

Remember the picture above of my cleverly made template of the holes in the front of my tractor?  It didn't help me one bit!  I could have drawn it free hand with a box of crayons and done a better job!  I made up a plate to bolt on there and only one of the five holes lined up at all.  I even took measurements to add to the template.  That's how it goes when you are trying to build something from scratch, I guess?  I imagine I'll have some blisters by the time I file out the holes to match up with the tractor.

 

Pictures and progress tomorrow.

 

Thanks for following along.

 

Jeff


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#13 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 07:06 PM

I too have problems drilling holes in the right spots; I bought a set of transfer punches from HF and every hole since has been in the right spot! A set is only $10 so to me it was worth it just for the first project I used it, I now use them anytime I can! If I where you I would pick up a set, they help more then I can put into words.
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#14 Oo-v-oO ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2013 - 08:23 PM

Yup, eyeballing the center of a hole with a standard center punch takes some skill and experience. I generally do fairly well, but a transfer punch takes all the guesswork out of it.



#15 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2013 - 05:53 AM

I too have problems drilling holes in the right spots; I bought a set of transfer punches from HF and every hole since has been in the right spot! A set is only $10 so to me it was worth it just for the first project I used it, I now use them anytime I can! If I where you I would pick up a set, they help more then I can put into words.

 

Thanks Ryan.  I hadn't heard of a transfer punch before.  A very handy tool to have and I can see why they would make these projects so much easier.

 

Jeff







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