Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Getting Rid Of Old Gas Smell


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 massey driver ONLINE  

massey driver

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 75
  • 1,073 Thanks
  • 1,444 posts
  • Location: Mainitoba Canada

Posted February 20, 2013 - 02:58 PM

Just wondering if anyone has a sure fire way to get rid of the smell of old gas. I'am helping my Grandson fix this old snowmobile he bought and the old gas smell is getting to us.Everything was OK untill I grabbed the fuel line that goes into the gas tank It started leaking old gas due to the rubber gromet being rotten.We had to drag the machine outside due to all the old gas leaking over everything..We can't work in the heated shop on account of the smell over powering us.Was kinda hoping to beable to pour something into the gas tank as well as were lots has leaked onto the machine itself.Its sitting on a sleigh that we move it around on and the old gas has gotten over it as well.Using water and ??  in freezing temps won't work so just asking if anyone has any ideas.Right now its on hold due to the smell.Of course you can imagine how happy he is with me right now that I won't bring it back inside to work on.LOL .I'll have to search other sources for the rubber gromet seeing Ski doo no longer has them.I need to get rid of the smell more so then anything.Thanks Larry


Edited by massey driver, February 20, 2013 - 03:38 PM.

  • JRJ said thank you

#2 JRJ OFFLINE  

JRJ
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 16399
  • 876 Thanks
  • 1,170 posts
  • Location: N.W. Arkansas

Posted February 20, 2013 - 03:13 PM

Larry I had a similiar problem with my GT235 right after I got it home. To make a long story short I found a rubber bushing into the gas tank where the gas line join it. I replace the bushing ($2.55) and the gas smell was gone. Hope yours can be as simple.

 

Just check the gas lines real good at all connections.

Dick


Edited by JRJ, February 20, 2013 - 03:14 PM.


#3 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

John@Reliable

    Procrastinators unite tomorrow

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 36
  • 1,295 Thanks
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location: Boston- Cape Cod MA

Posted February 20, 2013 - 03:33 PM

white vinegar, it's cheap and the results will surprise you. For the shop leave a few wide bowls of it to get rid of the smell.

We use it a lot to remove smell (smoke) in houses.


  • massey driver, Texas Deere and Horse, boyscout862 and 2 others have said thanks

#4 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,770 Thanks
  • 7,536 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted February 20, 2013 - 04:09 PM

If the smell is strong it still could be volatile. Be careful of a fire.



#5 superaben OFFLINE  

superaben
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 11204
  • 7,664 Thanks
  • 5,677 posts
  • Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA

Posted February 20, 2013 - 04:19 PM

I'll second the white vinegar.

 

Ben W.



#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted February 20, 2013 - 04:28 PM

That's hard to get rid of in a short time. I use Kitty Litter on diesel spills to soak up the fuel and it also seems to deal with the odour. I'm not sure if it would work on gas spills though. 



#7 Guest_rat88_*

Guest_rat88_*
  • Guests
  • Member No: 0
  • 0 Thanks

Posted February 20, 2013 - 05:55 PM

white vinegar, it's cheap and the results will surprise you. For the shop leave a few wide bowls of it to get rid of the smell.

We use it a lot to remove smell (smoke) in houses.

I use smoke to get rid of the stink from dead mice and birds in the shop. I have a small wood stove that I start up and pull the plates off and throw on a few big chunks of wood to fill the shop with smoke. It takes a couple of days before the smoke smell is mostly gone, but you dont notice the dead smell during that time.


  • massey driver and boyscout862 have said thanks

#8 MH81 OFFLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,281 Thanks
  • 28,615 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted February 20, 2013 - 06:21 PM

If it has leaked into the cement, the vinegar may help. I have also had luck getting it off hands or out of gloves/clothes with borax, water and head-n-shoulders... Might be something to consider when washing stuff off.

Coffee grounds do a decent absorption of odors.
  • massey driver and boyscout862 have said thanks

#9 Gtractor ONLINE  

Gtractor

    The Tractor Hoarder

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 782
  • 6,615 Thanks
  • 3,914 posts
  • Location: Chillicothe, MO

Posted February 20, 2013 - 09:16 PM

Go out and find a skunk. Capture said skunk.  Take skunk into shop and frighten skunk. 

You won't smell any old gas. 

 

:bigrofl:

 

OK, that might not be the best solution ~~~~~~~ 


  • MH81, IamSherwood, boyscout862 and 1 other said thanks

#10 John@Reliable ONLINE  

John@Reliable

    Procrastinators unite tomorrow

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 36
  • 1,295 Thanks
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location: Boston- Cape Cod MA

Posted February 20, 2013 - 10:27 PM

That's hard to get rid of in a short time. I use Kitty Litter on diesel spills to soak up the fuel and it also seems to deal with the odour. I'm not sure if it would work on gas spills though. 

If you ever have a large diesel spill after the "kitty litter" use good old fashion powdered lime, it wicks it out of concrete very good.

Put it down and after it turns color just sweep it up, repeat until no color change, if smell is still there, follow with a 5 gallon bucket of warm water and dish washing detergent, just put it on spill area and let it dry. I've done 100's of spills over the years, and these little things work, with out fancy chemicals which are $$.


  • massey driver, Texas Deere and Horse, JDBrian and 1 other said thanks

#11 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted February 21, 2013 - 05:14 AM

Thanks John. I have one of those flo and go nozzle rigs to put fuel into the 2320. The tank opening is on the top of the hood which is not a good spot for it if you aren't pumping the fuel. I put 2 20L (5.3gallon) tanks up on a shelf about 6ft high and use the nozzle to siphon the gas in. In the cold it sometimes sticks and won't shut off. This happened the other day and resulted in a bit of a mess. I find the Kitty Litter works well if you get it on right away. I always have it handy in the garage. I'll give the floor the treatment you recommend this summer to get it good and clean. 


  • boyscout862 said thank you

#12 Canawler OFFLINE  

Canawler

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1273
  • 1,893 Thanks
  • 1,750 posts
  • Location: York, PA

Posted February 21, 2013 - 11:56 AM

I told my wife there's a thread about getting rid of old gas smell.  She's following it with great interest. :smilewink:


  • boyscout862 said thank you

#13 bh115577 OFFLINE  

bh115577
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 9791
  • 434 Thanks
  • 235 posts
  • Location: Canastota NY

Posted February 21, 2013 - 12:20 PM

If the vinegar trick doesn't take care of it, which it should, you can get a spray can from the local HVAC supply house. It is for removing the smell of heating oil in a home if it leaks and I unfortunately know that it works very well. It's been about 10 years since I bought it but the spray was less than $10 I think.

 

 

This isn't the exact product I bought but it looks to be something similar.

 

http://www.zorbx.com...about_zorbx.asp


Edited by bh115577, February 21, 2013 - 12:25 PM.

  • massey driver and boyscout862 have said thanks

#14 John@Reliable ONLINE  

John@Reliable

    Procrastinators unite tomorrow

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 36
  • 1,295 Thanks
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location: Boston- Cape Cod MA

Posted February 21, 2013 - 09:57 PM

If the vinegar trick doesn't take care of it, which it should, you can get a spray can from the local HVAC supply house. It is for removing the smell of heating oil in a home if it leaks and I unfortunately know that it works very well. It's been about 10 years since I bought it but the spray was less than $10 I think.

 

 

This isn't the exact product I bought but it looks to be something similar.

 

http://www.zorbx.com...about_zorbx.asp

 odorgspy.jpg , is what you most likely have, it works on fresh fuel oil. Use it just about every day for work. More of a mask than removal, long term.

For big spills my outline above works, don't ask why I know, after 25 years in the heating business :smilewink:


  • boyscout862 and bh115577 have said thanks

#15 DougT OFFLINE  

DougT

    Dog Approved

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 584
  • 5,720 Thanks
  • 4,280 posts
  • Location: north central Ohio

Posted February 21, 2013 - 10:22 PM

On heavy oil stains at the shop, I use stoddard solvent. Put some on the floor and mop it around, then put oil dry on it. Go back later and sweep up the oil dry. It wil be reusable and the floor will be nice and clean.


  • boyscout862 said thank you




Top