Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
* * - - - 1 votes

Water In The Oil?


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,943 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted February 18, 2013 - 09:24 PM

Was reading another posting of someone with a JD and a Kohler 321 engine asking what the white stuff was on his dip stick, It seems we had something in common other than the 321's, we did not run the engines much. My BMP (1983 Ford LGT-145) sits in the shop most of the time, and is only run long enough to move to the driveway to free up room in the shop to work on other projects. Well, after reading that post I decided to pull out BMP's dip stick, I was shocked as to what I found. This is clean oil that I changed around Sept last year. The white crud was about 3-1/2 inches above the full mark.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • P1080078.JPG
  • P1080079.JPG
  • P1080080.JPG

  • boyscout862 and JRJ have said thanks

#2 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

John@Reliable

    Procrastinators unite tomorrow

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 36
  • 1,295 Thanks
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location: Boston- Cape Cod MA

Posted February 18, 2013 - 09:30 PM

Condensation, run the motor and it should go away


  • larrybl and boyscout862 have said thanks

#3 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,943 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted February 18, 2013 - 09:44 PM

Condensation, run the motor and it should go away

That was the consensus, so I ran BMP 20 Minuets under load of the big honkin 50" deck.

After that, I checked the oil again and about crapped my self! Way more water than I expected, and the oil looked milky. I immediately changed it.

I plan on taking BMP to town this weekend for the Rattle Snake Hunt and Antique Tractor Show. That is bout a 6 mile round trip. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • P1080097.JPG
  • P1080098.JPG
  • P1080100.JPG
  • P1080101.JPG


#4 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,281 Thanks
  • 28,615 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted February 18, 2013 - 09:44 PM

I would say its condensation too. Drought and arid air not withstanding... Water will find a way.

And you may have to change the name to BWM.
Blue Water Maker.
  • larrybl said thank you

#5 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

John@Reliable

    Procrastinators unite tomorrow

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 36
  • 1,295 Thanks
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location: Boston- Cape Cod MA

Posted February 18, 2013 - 09:52 PM

I would say its condensation too. Drought and arid air not withstanding... Water will find a way.

And you may have to change the name to BWM.
Blue Water Maker.

Thankfully no anti-freeze in it :bigrofl:


  • larrybl, MH81, KennyP and 1 other said thanks

#6 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,943 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted February 18, 2013 - 09:53 PM

After changing the oil, I drained it into a clean clear container, No sign of milkey or water, but it still shows up on the dip stick. I hope the 6 mile ride will clear it up. Of my three B/S engines, one of which has set on the bench almost 6 months without running show no signs of this. It must be due to the cast iron on the Kohler.

Attached Thumbnails

  • P1080112.JPG
  • P1080113.JPG


#7 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,943 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted February 18, 2013 - 10:00 PM

Thankfully no anti-freeze in it :bigrofl:

Now that would be rather disturbing, The second picture in the first post had me really concerned as to it's resemblance to a body fluid. :biting_nails:



#8 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,281 Thanks
  • 28,615 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted February 18, 2013 - 10:04 PM

You probably will find out some neighbor kid is spitting in your fill tube... :rolling:
  • larrybl said thank you

#9 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

John@Reliable

    Procrastinators unite tomorrow

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 36
  • 1,295 Thanks
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location: Boston- Cape Cod MA

Posted February 18, 2013 - 10:11 PM

Larry, you could be onto something, cast iron will hold the cold longer from overnight, which in your weather will cause more "dew", come day time, especially on something not used daily so heat can turn the liquid (water) into a gas.



#10 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,770 Thanks
  • 7,537 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted February 18, 2013 - 10:13 PM

It may not have been running long enough depending on air temperature. You should check the breather and its tube to the carb. If its not venting the crankcase, moisture can build up.


Edited by boyscout862, February 18, 2013 - 10:14 PM.


#11 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,943 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted February 18, 2013 - 10:32 PM

My internet connection died after my last post... Thought I was banned from the internet for that thought...... Yes I think it is related to the cast Iron in the engine. Then again it could be weather, I just checked again, and no sign of any moisture, and BMP has set for at least 24 hours. hmmmm



#12 1978murray OFFLINE  

1978murray

    diesel mechanic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2523
  • 598 Thanks
  • 1,163 posts
  • Location: harrison city, PA

Posted February 19, 2013 - 08:44 AM

its probably condisation or the detergent was seperating from the oil



#13 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

HDWildBill

    Freedom is not Free. Thank those in uniform for your freedom.

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 6354
  • 8,705 Thanks
  • 8,557 posts
  • Location: Ga

Posted February 19, 2013 - 09:33 AM

Larry; what you are experiencing is common with motorcycles that use an external oil tank.  In fact Harley has a big warning in there manual about this.  During the cold months if you let the engine sit and then start it up for just a few minutes just enough for the oil to warm up and shut it down it causes condensation in the oil and eventually it becomes milkey and then sludge at the bottom of the tank, which for a motorcycle is a death certificate.  The answer is when you fire the engine up let it get good and hot at operating temp for several minutes to boil off any condensation that may be present.   This is the first time I've heard of an internal sump having this issue but I would think it is very possible and since it only get moved (stated) for very short trips it makes sense.



#14 HydroHarold OFFLINE  

HydroHarold
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 9622
  • 702 Thanks
  • 977 posts
  • Location: Mid Hudson NY

Posted February 19, 2013 - 10:47 PM

The first winter I used my new '04 JD GX335 Kawi/20hp I was astounded to see FROST on the dipstick!  Did a little checking and realized I had been doing some short runs then some heavy snowblowing in very powdery snow with changeble winds.  I figured that during the blowing snow work the engine breathed a good deal of snow/moist air into the crankcase breather.  The moisture then collected on the dipstick and showed up the next time I checked it.  I sampled a bit of oil from the drain and there was no trace of liquid water (grey deposit/gunk) but I ran it up hot and did an oil+filter change anyway.

 

Engines "change" a lot of air in and out of the crankcase via the breather and if the air is humid and cold (or snowy) they will take in moisture.  As said previously, if the engine is not run up to full hot the moisture has no way to evaporate back out the breather.  An oil filter will not take out water.  Aluminum block/air cooled engines can run pretty cool when not loaded and/or run for short periods at low RPM.  BTW, used oil + combustion byproducts + water = acid formation, one reason car mfg'ers want you to change oil by a number of month(s) regardless of hours (miles). 



#15 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,943 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted February 19, 2013 - 11:09 PM

Thanks, I am one of those that change oil more often than needed. I stick to the 3000 mile rule on the highway vehicles which two are over 200k, and I change the oil on the LGT's at least twice a year, expecially during mowing seasion. BMP (the Kohler) was only used twice kast year for mowing, oil changed then parked. Hulk II (18hp B/S opposed) has been used most over the winter to clear and level dirt, and is up for next winter re-do. RED (also a 18hp B/S) was redone this winter in prep to be the main mowing unit this spring / summer). After this weekend BMP drive to a local event, I'll clean up and service BMP's deck and use him to assist in cuting the 3 acres this summer. I will need to find a project for BMP for the dormant winter months.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • BMP clean 1.JPG
  • Blade%202.jpg
  • P1070901.JPG

Edited by larrybl, February 19, 2013 - 11:14 PM.





Top