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Growing Giant Pumpkins


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#1 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 05:41 PM

As requested I am starting a new thread on growing big pumpkins.

First you need good seed, good soil, and good luck. LOL

The seed used is called Dill's Alantic Giant Pumpkin Seed. You can obtain this a lot of places but to be really competitive you need seed that from a known good source.

This seeds are named for the fruit they came from. My state record seed is called 685 Benner 09. That weight, name of grower and year grown.

The "parents" of this fruit are 1081 Leonzi 05 and 965 Pukos 07. The female goes first then the male.

Yes pumpkins have males and females, the fruit is always a female and the pollinator is the male.

I planted a 1081 Leonzi seed and used a 965 Pukos to pollenate. You pollenate by hand, more on that later.
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#2 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 07:01 PM

Now for the good soil, it takes 300 to 500 square feet per plant. I planted 3 plants in a 1000sqft patch and it was tight. Most good soil will work,you want it to be full of compost, loose, and free of weeds. When starting the seeds, I like to file the edges until they just start to change color. Soak the seeds for a few hours in warm water for a few hours. I used peat moss with nothing in it. Soak it with water and squeeze all the water out and pack it loosely in a large container. Something like a 1/2 gallon ice cream container, cover it and put it on just a little heat. It will take a week to 10 days to sprout. When you start the seeds you have 2 weeks to get them in the ground. These are some of the fastest growing plants in the world, you don't want them stopping for any reason. Make sure your patch ready in time to plant. The first 2 leaves are the "seed leaves", these will fall off later. The next 2 leaves are the true leaves. Now comes the fun part, planting out. You have to aim the plants. Yes aim them. The second true leaf 90% of the time will be the main vine. When you plant point the second leave the direction you want the plant to grow. The first true leaf will form the back main. The plant mine about 5' from the edge of the patch. I like to add Mycorrhizal fungus to the planting hole. Now as with any plant started inside, they are tender and VERY to damage. You have to acclimate them to being outside. When I start any plant in the house I like to keep a small fan blowing on them so they get used to the wind. Also these plants can sunburn very easily. Take them outside for a few hours at a time for a few days in a row until they used to it.

#3 Racerxxx OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 07:04 PM

Last year I tried to grow a giant.

First time ever. I studied up and read up some.

I estimate mine was about 90 pounds.

I did do the hand pollinating but didnt  pollinate from different parents.

Is that a neccesity? I hand pollinated from the same plant male and female.

I have my spot all laid out and fertilized.

I am aware that the punkin spot needs good rich loose soil, thats what I got.

Any pointers?



#4 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 07:09 PM

 You pollenate by hand, more on that later.

 

Man, that takes the fun out of it!



#5 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 07:14 PM

 You pollenate by hand, more on that later.
 
Man, that takes the fun out of it!


Well it's kinda like rape!! The first time I felt like I needed a cigarette when I was done.
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#6 Racerxxx OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 07:22 PM

I needed a nap.



#7 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 07:27 PM

A lot of growers use gypsum to add calcium to the soil. Pumpkins like calcium. A lot of in it is feeding the soil, the soil is full of microbes, some are good and some are bad. You want to grow the good ones and keep the bad ones under control. With all the pollutants in the air it's hard to do. That's the reason for the Mycorrhizal fungus, it builds a massive root system. I don't use chemical fertilizers, I do use blood meal to add nitrogen, I made my own fertilizer for the rest of it. Another trick is to not pack the soil down. I used walk boards and has special shoes with plywood fastened to the bottom. The good microbes need loose soil so they get oxygen, roots need oxygen too.

Edited by Amigatec, February 17, 2013 - 07:28 PM.

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#8 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2013 - 11:34 PM

Growing big pumpkins is starting to grow on me. Last year had my biggest one yet at 230#. Just been trying to get the proper time to put them in the ground to have the longest growing cycle. Put them in 3 weeks later last year and had great results by doing so.

 

About how long of a growing cycle do you try and shoot for? Also have you ever heard or tried putting a fish in the ground by the plant/seed to use as fertilizer?

 

I'll be watching this thread for input and suggestions. If you don't want to go to indepth its totally undrestandable, You don't want to give away all your secrets  :smilewink:



#9 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2013 - 04:16 AM

I did use some Neptunes Fish fertilizer. The biggest thing is to take care of the soil. You have to feed the soil. The patch is the food factory for the plant, the roots can run 30 feet or more from the stump. After you plant and have aimed correctly, it will start growing straight up, you need to get it to lay down as soon as possible. These vines are very to snap. It's best to work your vines in the heat of the day, these vines are hollow. The plant will get a foot or 2 tall before it starts to ly down from its own weight. As soon as the main vine is on the ground, you need to protect it from being blown around and twisted in the wind. I like to use those cheap wooden skewers, I place them on both sides of the vine in an X fashion. If the wind is real bad I will use bricks. Place one on both sides of the vine and one arp cross the top. When the vine get a foot or two long, it's time to start burying the vines. About foot or so the vine will put out a leaf, a side vine, and a tendril. These will also produce a root. I take a small hand shovel and dig a trench under the vine and add a little Mycorrhizal fungus at each leaf junction. Do this at every leaf junction. You want to train the vines, you need to keep the vines running straight, and keep all the weeds out. You don't want the weeds taking all the nutrients out of the soil. Keep working the plants, burying all the vines, I like to keep a small trench in front of the vines. If you want to check how fast it is growing, stick a skewer in the ground at the end of the vine. These vines can grow over a foot a day. After a few weeks it will look like a Christmas tree laying on the ground. At this point you should start seeing flowers.
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#10 Racerxxx OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2013 - 06:28 PM

20130517_193614 (1).jpg

 

Giants are here.






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