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How To Repair A T92 Transmission Shifter Button


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#1 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 16, 2013 - 09:28 PM

The T92 transmission was used in all of the steel body Economy and Power kings up until the early 80's when the 4 speed started being used. The T92 is a very rigid and strong transmission: although, after years of shifting the button on the bottom of the shifter becomes worn. When this becomes worn and out of shape it can slide between the shifter rails and jam into gear. This is a very common problem, now that out tractors are getting older. It is actually a fairly straight forward job to repair the shifter; the hardest part of this job is disassembling, and reassembling the transmission cover. Follow along and I will go step by step on how to do this.

 

Once you have the cover off of the transmission, remove the shifter knob and boot.

AA63AE51-EB17-4CEF-8CEA-90CF8C89EEB2-189

 

Shift the cover into what would be neutral, and the underside should look like this.

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Turn the cover onto its side, and remove the set screw towards the back.

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Behind the set screw will be a spring, and a small steel ball, turn the cover over and remove them.

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Now stand the cover up, so that the shifter is towards the bottom. Using a hammer TAP on the shifting fork on the right side. Hit the fork as close to the rail as possible, hitting the prong will bend or break it off. Make sure that the end of the shifter lever is moved all the way away from the rail; if the button is in the notch in the rail it will not move far enough.

8CD3E56D-A797-4753-A906-9B87F51B2DAD-189

 

Hitting the fork repeatedly should have knocked the plug out of the end.

FC5F1A33-03AE-45DF-BB51-FDF6D465BF74-189 

Turn the cover over and do the same with the other side.

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Now that plug should have come out.

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Now, remove the roll pin holding the fork next to the shifter. You may have to rotate the fork and rail so that the pin can go into the opening behind it.

53E70DD6-2261-4357-953B-68C58897ABB6-189

 

Once the pin is out, shift into what would be reverse. The fork should slide, and the rail should stay in place. You can now slide the other rail as far back as it will go. Again, orient the fork so the roll pin will go into the opening behind it.

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With the roll pin out, remove the fork from the rail.

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The rail will now slide out of the cover.

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Between the rails, there will be an egg shaped object; this egg prevents the transmission from being shifted into two gears at the same time.

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Now slide the other rail over and take the fork off.

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You may now remove the other rail left in the cover.

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Behind that rail, will be another spring and ball.

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With a screwdriver, pop the end of the spring over the first of the three teeth.
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With a pair of needle nose pliers, "unscrew" the spring.

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After a few turns, the spring will come out.

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The shifter lever will now slide out of the cover.

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There is a pin that keeps the shifter from rotating, remove it. Even though the shifter is already out, it will prevent it from being lost when moving the cover around.

F5C3B512-1FE7-4B85-9EEF-1D882D44FF76-189

 

Using THIS tutorial, you can now rebuild the button on the bottom of the shift lever.

 

Now that you have repaired the button, you can go backwards to put the cover back together. The first thing you have to do, is put that pin back in.

F5C3B512-1FE7-4B85-9EEF-1D882D44FF76-189

 

Now put the shift lever back in. One side of the ball that the spring pushes on will have a groove, this goes over the pin that you just put back in.

43E6CBE2-672D-4929-9499-F13E00793679-189

 

Putting this spring back in, can be tricky; you can not screw it back in like you did to take it out. To put it in, I just work it back in with a screwdriver until it is securely back in place.

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Next, put the one of the springs and a ball back in. Holding the cover so that the holes are all vertical, will help the spring and ball fall all the way to the bottom.

3C3D9F14-5292-48C1-938A-449AF6617EFC-189

 

Of the two pins, you can now replace the one that does NOT have the notch in it. When replaced, the two detentes (grooves)  towards the back should be facing away from the shifter button.

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Before the rail is all the way in, slide the fork with the notch in the side onto the rail. The notch should be facing the shifter button.

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Line up the holes, and put the roll pin back in.

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In the hole that this rail went though, put the plug back in.

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With the first rail back in, put the egg back in. It will likely take you many tries to get the egg to fall into the hole without tilting as it goes though the opening for the other rail.

2E14DDBD-2A34-42C0-992C-79026DF2CD6E-189

 

The remaining rail can now be put back in. Orient the rail so that the detentes are facing away from the shifter button.

FACB4B79-A398-4BD9-961F-BBC1FC26D025-189

 

Before the rail is all the way in, put the other for on. Make sure that it is facing  the same direction as it is in the photo below.

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Again, line up the holes and put the roll pin back in.

ED1D3F13-1DB8-4E80-BF2A-ECA2644AD6DB-189

 

Put the other plug back into the end.

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The other spring and steel ball can now be put back into place.

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Now replace the screw back into the side of the cover. Do NOT tighten the screw, a couple threads past flush is fine for now.

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Finally, put the boot and shifter knob back on.

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Before putting the cover back on, shift into all positions to make sure that it "clicks" into every gear. You may also have to adjust the screw in the side of the cover so that it takes the same amount of force to shift into all of the gears.

 

NOTE: I did not repair the button when I took this apart. I had already repaired this shifter almost two years ago. Since the weld metal was softer then the original metal, it has worn quite a bit already. (this is the cover from the '71 1614 PK)


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#2 Bob 537 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 16, 2013 - 10:11 PM

maybe a staff member could pin this for us!   please :smilewink:  :worshippy1:


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#3 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 06:44 AM

Very welll done Ryan! :thumbs:   I don't own one of those transmissions but if I did I'm pretty sure I could do that repair without any issues given these excellent instructions and photos. I'll pin this so it's easily found in the future. 


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#4 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 07:03 AM

That is a good write up, Ryan. Thanks for taking the time to do it.


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#5 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 08:34 AM

I thought it should be upgraded to an article, but we've had problems when we've done it in the past, so we'll just leave it here pinned for now.


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#6 pharmer OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 09:42 AM

This reminds me of the time about 10 yrs ago I was rebuilding NP435 shift covers where I work. I did about 25 a day because UPS would buy them in bulk for their package cars (big brown delivery trucks). Nice job Ryan.
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#7 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 10:07 AM

Ryan, excellent tutorial.  If I had one of those transmissions I believe I could follow it and do the repair very easily.  :thumbs:


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#8 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 12:27 PM

Great write up and pictures Ryan, :thumbs:  I don't have to do that yet on mine but I sure think this would make it a lot easier when/if i have to.


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#9 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 12:38 PM

Thanks guys! Depending on the response this got I was going to make it an article also, but if there are problems I will just leave it here.

Great write up and pictures Ryan, :thumbs: I don't have to do that yet on mine but I sure think this would make it a lot easier when/if i have to.


You could just drop it off at my house, and I will gladly do the repair! It will probably take a year or two though.
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#10 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 02:20 PM

Thanks guys! Depending on the response this got I was going to make it an article also, but if there are problems I will just leave it here.
 

 

Ryan, you could do it separately as an article, and just leave this thread right here in the PK forum.  That's how I did my ongoing V4-6 restoration article so I could avoid it getting messed up by promoting it from a common thread to an article.



#11 Bob 537 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 02:22 PM

so when you did this were you bare foot  :rolling: you will need some oxy clean to get that sock clean



#12 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2013 - 02:25 PM

so when you did this were you bare foot :rolling: you will need some oxy clean to get that sock clean


No, in one picture you can see I put my boots back on. Lol!

#13 jacottrill OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2013 - 03:12 PM

Excellent job of writing this up.  The step by step was done nicely and will allow others to repair their own shifters/transmission covers by themselves.  It would be nice if we had this type of step by steps for other repairs. Experts out there..hint hint !

#14 Glenn Ayers OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2014 - 11:35 AM

I've done this repair in the past using the "let's see how this comes apart" method.   It's great to see it described in detail here.  I need to do this repair to another of my PK's very shortly & will refer to this post to speed thing up this time.  Thanks !

BTW .. does anyone have the width specs on the shifter ball that we are repairing ?   It would be nice to know exactly how wide they are when new ... then we can shoot for this measurement instead of trial & error when welding/grinding.

~Glenn



#15 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2015 - 04:18 PM

Shifter specifications.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Shifter specs.JPG

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