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Metal Fuel Lines


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#1 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 05:04 PM

What are your guys' opinions on metal fuel lines? Since I need to put a be line on the '17 1614 PK (and a couple others) I thought about maybe using brake lines. I have seen tractors with the metal, and I think it looks neater, if done correctly. What are your takes?

#2 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 05:20 PM

 Most certainly ! Just be sure to have a few flex points to relieve stresses from vibration .


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#3 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 05:21 PM

I think that the metal gas lines could have tendancy to rub and you know what that causes. I agree that the metal does look neather.

 

Dick


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#4 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 05:21 PM

I think metal fuel lines would be much better then rubber.  How ever you may have some serious work shaping the line to get it where it needs to go.  You will need a tubing bender and maybe a flaring tool.  Also I believe brake lines would be to big enough to deliver the quantity of fuel you will need.  


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#5 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 05:25 PM

The flex points are a very good tip! That is not something I would have thought of!

 

Bill, I have a bender and flaring tool, so no problem there.


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#6 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 05:35 PM

With flex points you will need several locations to have some kind of brackets to the frame.

 

Dick,



#7 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 05:36 PM

To flare a steel line you need what is called a double flare. There is a piece that goes in before the flare that puts a bubble on the end of the line and then the flare point rolls it in to form the flare. Steel will crack if you try to single flare it like copper. There is a new alloy line out that works easy and doesn't rust.

 

Making a loop in the line gives it the flex.


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#8 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 06:42 PM

I'll be honest: I usually swap to rubber if I plan to use a machine, since I can drop in an inline fuel filter.  However, if its something I'm restoring, I will use metal. 

 

Are you thinking copper or a steel line? Copper is my preference.  When you polish it up it looks sharp next to new paint!

 

Ben W.



#9 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 06:56 PM

I like your idea, and was thinking about doing the same. I plan on using short, good rubber hose at both tank and carb as my final connection due to vibration but was also going to add a glass bowl somewhere inline on the metal line to see the water in this crap gas we get. This way a quick look to see if it needs to be emptied before problems get to carb. :thumbs: 


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#10 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 07:05 PM

I'll be honest: I usually swap to rubber if I plan to use a machine, since I can drop in an inline fuel filter. However, if its something I'm restoring, I will use metal.

Are you thinking copper or a steel line? Copper is my preference. When you polish it up it looks sharp next to new paint!

Ben W.


I forgot about the filter! I don't think I could easily get a filter into a metal line. Maybe it would be better to stick with rubber?

#11 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 07:11 PM

Harbor Freight has the bending and flaring tools. Double flaring is a PITA and is necesarry for high pressures like brake lines. You can get buy with a mini cutter and using copper lines with ferrel connections. The copper lines flex easily, but they can kink, so be careful. You need the ferrel fittings for each end and enough tubing for between them. When cutting the tubing the cutter raises a ridge. Some cutters have tools built in to clean the i.d. and o.d., If not use a small file so that the ferrels slip on. Put everything in place and check for alignment. When you tighten the packing nuts the ferrels will be compressed onto the tube permenantly. Do not over tighten because the packing nuts will break. Good Luck, Rick

 

Screw the filter into the bottom of the tank and then run the line from the filter to the carb.


Edited by boyscout862, February 15, 2013 - 07:14 PM.

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#12 8tyman8 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 15, 2013 - 07:31 PM

On the engine in my 1256 (wisconsin tra12d)i had ALL Kinds of fuel issues All kinds ... and i used Stainless steel Swageloc fittings and line (probably 50-60 in line and fittings) still did not solve the issue so i ripped it off i should of just just left it on i plan to use Almost all steel lines on my 1256D also my other wisconsin (ane-l ? )has Copper lines with compression fittings also if you need to go from Rubber to steel use your double flaring tool to make a Ridge so the hose does not slip off 



#13 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 16, 2013 - 06:50 AM

A concern  that enters my mind would be the moisture in the fuel and the possibility of rust forming inside the steel lines.  Maybe this could not happen with the steel lines being sealed and full of gasoline, therefore no oxygen present.  But if you ran it out of fuel and the tubing emptied???

 

I do not know if this could be an issue but..................my 2cents worth, value accordingy


Edited by Michiganmobileman, February 16, 2013 - 06:51 AM.


#14 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2013 - 04:10 PM

to fasten the hard lines you can use something like this:

http://www.mcmaster....-clamps/=lkc0cv

 

or if you want to be fancy you could use something like this:

http://www.lsbilletw...stom-clamp.html

or this:

http://www.chicagoco...nc9oa855q3qneg7






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