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Powdercoating Hyd Cylinders?


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#1 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 12:31 PM

this isn't on my a tractor but it well could be on one; I have (2) hydraulic cylinders that I need to rebuild. In the process, I know someone that does powdercoating; i would like to do these cylinders before they go back into service. But since they cost $935/each if I wind up having to get new ones (if I screw them up) I am a little leery of it;

should I;

1) put pipe plugs in them, have them done now before I take them apart  OR

2) rebuild them (I have the kits on hand already)  and then have them coated  OR

3)take them apart and have just the bare housing powdercoated  OR

4) screw it; just rebuild them, scuff them and rattlecan them?

 

these cylinders are fairly noticeable where they mount but are "protected within a column", and a PITA to put in/take out;  so I want them to look good with the rest of the unit, stay looking good, protect them, and have a fresh surface, so I can more readily tell if they decide to leak again?

I like the idea of having them coated because if they do decide to eventually leak, PC holds up better to oils and fluids than Krylon, if you get what I mean.....

 

 



#2 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 12:41 PM

I like the idea of PC them, I am not that familiar with the process of the coating but I like #2 that way you won't have to handle them that much and it is over.  By the way which machine are they going on,

 

Dick


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#3 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 12:47 PM

I'd take them apart and PC them before you do the rebuild. Then you don't have to worry about wrecking any seals/gaskets when baking them. I think they bake at around 400 degrees.


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#4 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 01:06 PM

I like the idea of PC them, I am not that familiar with the process of the coating but I like #2 that way you won't have to handle them that much and it is over.  By the way which machine are they going on,

 

Dick

believe it or not, they are part of a 2 post automotive lift that I bought a lil while back on CL,

we had to dismantle it from the place we bought it from, it was still set up and functional when i went up to see it before I decided to buy it.  but

1) there are alot of hyd cylinders on the equip that we all come to this site for so I thought it applied here, and

(2)  in addition to doing maintenance on my daily drivers I do hope I can use it while doing maintenance on my machinery as well. I am anxious to get this lift back up and functional and wasn't worried about the "pretty" factor as much, but with my son is the powdercoater at his job, and is twisting my arm to go ahead with this, what else to do?



#5 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 03:54 PM

I think #3 is best so the seals are not exposed to the acid cleaning and the heat of the PC process.



#6 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 04:53 PM

I vote for clean, rebuild IF that is what you want, Paint them and ignore after assembly!  Maybe not even paint, just rebuild!  There gonna be out of site for the most and won't work any better when prettier!



#7 Bmerf ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 05:26 PM

3 or 4, powder coating is nice, but the cylinders will have to be baked in an oven to set the coating. It would be terrible to install, only to find the new seals melted. Rebuild, scuff and paint. Done.


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#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 06:04 PM

If the cylinders are out of harms way and not likely to get wet then a good paint job would be all thats required. Powder coating is overkill if nobody will see them up close and you don't need the added durability it provides. 


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#9 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2013 - 06:47 PM

my only reason for asking this sort of a question is that like I said; in the event of a leak, PC is more durable.. and my son has access to the PC booth....



#10 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2013 - 06:02 PM

I vote for clean, rebuild IF that is what you want, Paint them and ignore after assembly!  Maybe not even paint, just rebuild!  There gonna be out of site for the most and won't work any better when prettier!

this is what I wound up doing;  cup wire brush on Milwaukee hand held grinder, primed and painted with Valspar Restoration series tractor paint (rattle can)  It may not be seen much but if you look in the columns they are visible and *if* I have a leak, it will be easier to spot and determine where the source is   as long as #68 hydraulic fluid don't eat that paint if it does decide to ever leak, that is.



#11 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2013 - 06:07 PM

my only reason for asking this sort of a question is that like I said; in the event of a leak, PC is more durable.. and my son has access to the PC booth....

and while we had it down, we dismantled it all the way to bare elements and the kid sandblasted and coated every last part of it for me except these cylinders, the pump unit (he did PC the metal reservoir) and the electric motor. I rattle canned all of these pieces that were not PC'd.   He has since left that job, I think his priorities are in the wrong place but he won't listen to ol Dad... yeah he went straight into another job, but his reasons for leaving, the pay cut he took in his job swap, and other things I think he made a mistake.... but that's definitely material for a different thread....


Edited by dodge trucker, April 15, 2013 - 06:08 PM.





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