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Wake up call


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#1 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 07:44 PM

As some of you know I drive a boom truck for a landscaper's supply and we delivery stone, brick, aggregates, etc. Today on my last delivery, 2nd last skid of mat. to come off the truck, the cable snapped.
5500lbs from 6ft in the air, 5ft from where I was standing, PLOP right on the sidewalk.
Nobody hurt, almost all the flagstone on that skid broke into 2 or 3 pieces each and the sidewalk from what I can see didn't even crack. Normally when I unload as soon as I clear the truck I start to lower the mat. down to about a foot off the ground as I move it to where it has to go. In this case I was picking up from the front of the truck bed (opposite the base of the crane) picked the skid up high then retracted the boom to clear a tree so I could swing to the side, drop, then extend to put it where it had to go. After I retracted I looked to where it had to go, then looked back at the skid, started to swing, looked again to where it had to go and before I looked back to start to lower PLOP right on the sidewalk, I was parked right beside the sidewalk. About 4500lbs +or- of material + 900lbs for my fork call it 5500lbs altogether. The cable on this crane has a working load rating of 10,000 lbs.
Just think if my foot or a kid ???
I hate unloading when people are around, kids that are running around loose, I just stop and say stand over there, or tell the parents keep them out of the way far away, usually works. The worst is the guy who wants to help, he just gets in the way and slows me down, plus he doesn't know the danger zones. Standing under the material is obvious, but standing between the material and the base of the crane is just as bad. There are 2 cables on my crane 1 for up + down, the other for extend + retract you stand in between the mat. and the base that cable snaps whatever is on the hook slides down towards you, PLOP.
:added: The crane I run is a telescopic one.

I guess what I'm trying too say here is you can never ever be too careful, after today I think I'll take an extra step back away from where I think I should be.

Edited by DH1, September 13, 2010 - 08:11 PM.
added content.

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#2 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 07:48 PM

Wow!
Glad to hear that nobody was hurt.
Just goes to show you anything can happen...

#3 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 07:52 PM

Doug, I am glad nobody was hurt. Cables snapping are a big danger, especially if you or someone else was in the path of the snap back. Good thing is with the booms it will usually snap up and loose most of it's energy. I used to deliver cement block for foundation walls with a straight truck and boom. I used to love it especially swinging the skids down into the basements but we usually didn't have anyone around us since it was always new places being built. With you doing landscape supplies I am sure you get a lot of deliveries where people are always around.

#4 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 07:54 PM

No body hurt, All else can be fixed.
Great work.

#5 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 08:16 PM

Doug, I am glad nobody was hurt. Cables snapping are a big danger, especially if you or someone else was in the path of the snap back. Good thing is with the booms it will usually snap up and loose most of it's energy. I used to deliver cement block for foundation walls with a straight truck and boom. I used to love it especially swinging the skids down into the basements but we usually didn't have anyone around us since it was always new places being built. With you doing landscape supplies I am sure you get a lot of deliveries where people are always around.


Running the boom with nobody or wires or trees around is fun, you can really move fast.
My truck is a triaxle straight truck, telescopic boom on the back, probably similar to what you had.

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 08:24 PM

DH1, I work on overhead cranes for a living and wire rope inspections are a big part of my responsibilities. I can fully appreciate the danger posed by a suspended load. I am very glad that no one was injured. We have operators at work who insist on running up and down the main walking / driving paths with loads suspended...and they'll run right over your head if you're not paying attention. I tell them time and again that "I'm the one who certifies them to be safe, and I won't put myself under them! shouldn't that be a fair enough warning to YOU!" I'm glad to hear that you're a conscientious operator and as Ducky said, No one injured, all else can be fixed!

#7 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 08:39 PM

Glad no one got hurt,bad things happen in less then a heartbeat.Any job no matter what has hidden danger's.Everyone be careful out there. .Larry

#8 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2010 - 04:59 AM

Yes sir,sure glad no one was hurt.

#9 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2010 - 05:48 AM

Glad to hear Doug that no one was hurt! Even with the safest operator, mechanical things break. By keeping your working area as safe as possible you do the best you can.

#10 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2010 - 07:24 AM

Glad no one was hurt. Things can go wrong in a heartbeat & part of the reason no one was hurt is the operator knows that & took precautions. Years ago, I did antenna work for the company I work for. One of the ladders I inherited from the previous installer had "come off" the roof of the van years ago. It was a 40' aluminum ladder that had a slight bow & was missing a rung. I wouldn't use it & after the 2nd job I couldn't get up to with the other ladder, they replaced it with a new 32' . It was still aluminum, but I put stipulations & practices in place that wouldn't put me in a shocking position. I also wouldn't go up until I spoke with the parents as to where the kids would be. If something gets away from you on a 30' peak on a 6-12 roof, it's a gonna slide off. Even a 7/16 wrench could do some serious damage, let alone a 10' length of mast pipe. Don't do the job anymore, don't miss it either.

#11 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2010 - 06:49 PM

Took the truck in first thing this morning to a trucking co. that hauls concrete blocks for a block co. They have at least 8 trucks all with the same crane on them, same basic configuration as the one I drive. Got new lifting cable and had the mechanic give it a good check over, made a couple of adjustments and it's working in good shape. Every time I go there I learn something and he pointed out a couple of things to watch for, early signs of trouble, he told me they have 1 truck that goes through a lifting cable every 3 months and others that last 3 to 4 yrs. Mine was 2 to 3 yrs old so I say I should get a new cable once every year and it will probably never break again.




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