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Repairing Stripped Muffler Mounting Hole


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#1 Titus OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 11:58 AM

Hi everyone!

    I have a TRA-10D Wisconsin I will be pulling shortly and I noticed where the muffler screwed into the engine, well it's stripped. What can I do to fix that? Thanks!



#2 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 12:04 PM

Most times they just "appear" to be stripped, but rather, the threads are filled with rust & crud.  If you can get a NPT pipe tap of the right size, you can chase the threads clean to truly see what is left to work with.  You can also use a Dremel with a cut-off wheel to clean the threads, but takes time, and those wheels break easily.


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#3 Titus OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 12:20 PM

Where could I find the correct size for the muffler to chase those threads? Thanks Daniel!



#4 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 12:48 PM

Tractor supply, Sears, or any good hardware store.

 

Dick



#5 Titus OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 01:08 PM

I meant what is the size? I mean, I could drag the engine in there, but would prefer to just walk in with the size. If no one has it handy, I'll check the manual when I get home.



#6 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 01:34 PM

I'd have guessed 3/4" or 1" [my Model AB was 3/4"]but guessing gets expensive so.....

Quick check of the manual calls for a 1" pipe nipple from block to the muffler.  So you would be looking for a 1" NPT pipe tap to chase the threads in the block.  Hope that will solve the problem, Daniel is right, usually they are just crudded up.


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#7 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 03:08 PM

Thanks Peter, I was thinking 1", but then I usually just take a piece of pipe with me to go by, as I am terrible remembering sizes.



#8 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 06:43 PM

If you're looking for a poor man's tap, take a steel pipe plug that size and cut several grooves across the threads at a 90 degree. 5 or 6 will do. Some guys will temper the plug after this... I don't, but i want the plug to not be to hard either...
And keep in mind, you always (new tap, home made, whatever) want to be careful you don't pop (break) the block... Remember, it's cast.
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#9 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 08:38 PM

If you're looking for a poor man's tap, take a steel pipe plug that size and cut several grooves across the threads at a 90 degree. 5 or 6 will do. Some guys will temper the plug after this... I don't, but i want the plug to not be to hard either...
And keep in mind, you always (new tap, home made, whatever) want to be careful you don't pop (break) the block... Remember, it's cast.

I think that's a chase not a tap :D


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#10 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2013 - 10:30 PM

I recently had to cut a broken exhaust pipe nipple out of a block. After I got the broken piece out, I had roughed up some of the threads, and some were filled with rust. I used the 1" pipe tap and used plenty of penatrating oil to help clean out the threads. Go slow and keep the tap lubricated.



#11 Canawler ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2013 - 08:45 PM

FYI - Harbor Freight carries a 6 pc. pipe tap set that includes 1" and is on sale for $39.99 right now.


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#12 Titus OFFLINE  

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Posted February 24, 2013 - 05:23 PM

Thank you guys!

 

Would anyone happen to have the tap that I could borrow? I'll cover shipping both ways and a little extra. I'd rather try to help someone on here rather than spend $30 for something I'm going to use once.



#13 Old Suburban Tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2013 - 11:36 AM

I definately would use chase the threads very slowly with a pipe tap & lubricant. Like others have replied be slow because it's cast. You can use a NPT (National Pipe Tap) or NPS (National Pipe Straight). I recently did my 12HP Kohler which was a 1" pipe size. I used a 1" x 11.5 NPT, I would have preferred a NPS thread but didn't have that tap.  The threads from the manufacturer in this cast block are a NPS. NPS needs no sealant and NPT are mainly for plumbing applications where a sealant is used. What I noticed in my case the manufacturer use a Street Pipe Fitting, actually a Street 45 Black Schedule 80. These Street Fittings hardly have any taper, and are only catching about 4 threads when screwed into the block with the Conduit Locknut securing it not to move. Over the years these exposed threads inside the block get carboned up and corrode/deteriorate. I used a NPT Black Schedule 80 Nipple back into the block and made sure I didn't over tighten it because of being a tapered thread because of expanding contracting of the block and nipple. Then secured it with the Conduit Locknut. One reason I used a nipple is because I changed my direction where exhaust came out so I wouldn't be breathing the fumes.






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