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Homemade Sod Cutter Thingy??


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9 replies to this topic

#1 massey driver ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2010 - 05:57 PM

Needed to raise the lawn by the back entrance so rather then rent a sod cutter for a half day[minimum] I made one out of some discarded lawn mower blades and deck wheels.I didn't want to have to build a frame so I just mounted it onto the 3 pth forks that I use on either the MF 1655 or the MF Gc2300.I used the MF 2300 for this job but could have used the MF 1655.Anyway it worked pretty good and did the job that I needed it too do. It's pretty simple I used old mower blades for the cutting edges[bottom and sides] and used old deck wheels for the depth gauge wheels.Mounting it onto the forks is very quick and simple as it slides onto one of the pins and I use one bolt to keep it in place.I used some 1" sq tubing for the main frame as well as for the torque[twisting] limiter.I mounted it so that when I line up the front tire with the edge of the grass thats were the next cut will be.Of course I have to cut the sod into lengths with a track shovel.Its not pretty just banged it up quick to lift the sod,sure saved my back.Larry

Attached Thumbnails

  • sod cutter 006 (Small).jpg
  • sod cutter 001 (Small).jpg
  • sod cutter 003 (Small).jpg
  • sod cutter 002 (Small).jpg
  • sod cutter 004 (Small).jpg
  • sod cutter 005 (Small).jpg


                       

#2 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2010 - 06:22 PM

Well Larry, you banged it together to work danged perfect! You do some good engineering.:thumbs:
So what's the project with the sod exactly?

#3 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2010 - 07:05 PM

Man you did a good job building that,and it looks like it worked great.

#4 massey driver ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2010 - 07:24 PM

Well Larry, you banged it together to work danged perfect! You do some good engineering.:thumbs:
So what's the project with the sod exactly?


I had put steps all around the back deck so I used some patio blocks to set the steps on and they ended up being a couple inches higher then the lawn.That was done last summer,so in the winter it was a pain to watch out for the blocks as they were higher then the lawn when snowblowing,same as when cutting grass it was a pain to cut so I needed to riase the lawn to the same height as the blocks.I didn't want to just add soil and re seed so decided it would be better to cut out the sod and raise it up.This way mud dirt etc: isn't going to get tracked into the house.Larry.

#5 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2010 - 08:10 PM

Very nice job Larry! I rented one for a project years ago and have thought ever since that I could build one if I ever needed one again. That looks like the perfect design! Thanks for sharing the pics!

#6 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2010 - 09:23 AM

Larry you did a great job for a quick project. Looks like it worked perfect for what you were wanting to do. Good job :D

#7 harrycu OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 10:23 AM

Larry, that was really a neat piece of equipment. I wish I had the imagination and ingenuity to cobble together stuff like that. Thanks for the pictures.

Harry

#8 DMF OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 10:32 AM

Nice job!

#9 massey driver ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 01:02 PM

Thanks for the kind words.I did find one thing that I'd change and that would be to put on bigger/wider wheels just to get a better even depth..Larry

#10 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 03:09 PM

Now that you mention it, the one that I rented had a solid roller and it was in front of the blade. But that design seems to have worked pretty well for you.