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Question: What Is The Different Of A Tube And A Pipe?


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#1 Per OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 06:50 PM

Hi,

when I was writing in another thread  I began to wonder if I should use the word tube or pipe. When I look the 2 words up in the google translate the same word came out in Danish.

Can somebody learn me the different between a tube and a pipe?

 

Thx.



#2 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 06:56 PM

To me it is the application it is being used in.  A pipe is usually a tube that carries something like water, gas, oil and can withstand pressure from with in.  A tube is usually a bit thinner wall and used for like frames or a structural application.  Motorcycle frames are an example of a tube.  At least that is my definition between the two.


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#3 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 06:58 PM

I'm not sure that there's an official difference, and this may be more a regional thing than anything else, but we tend to use pipe when it transports something liquid (water pipe, gas pipe etc.) and tube when it's stationary, empty, or holds air (steel tubing, inner tube, etc). 


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#4 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:04 PM

A pipe is used for transporting things, like fluid or gas; a tube is for structural purposes.

 

The dimensioning is also different. A pipe's size is specified by the inside diameter (for pipe up to 12") and the outside diameter is determined by the wall thickness, called the schedule. Tubing, is specified by the OD, and ID depends on the wall thickness; the thickness of the wall of tubing of often expressed in a gauge.


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#5 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:07 PM

This is my understanding in the difference.

Pipe is measured on the inside diameter, and uses schedule sizing for wall thickness (40, 80,....)

Tubing is measured on the outside diameter, and comes in different wall thickness.


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#6 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:08 PM

You type faster than I do Ryan. :smilewink:

 

 

Also, there is a difference, in method of production, but I can't recall.


Edited by IamSherwood, January 11, 2013 - 07:10 PM.

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#7 Per OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:13 PM

Ok, thank to you all.

Now I understand the different.

First I thought it had something to do with the shape round or square.

Once again thx.



#8 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:15 PM

A pipe is used for transporting things, like fluid or gas; a tube is for structural purposes.

 

The dimensioning is also different. A pipe's size is specified by the inside diameter (for pipe up to 12") and the outside diameter is determined by the wall thickness, called the schedule. Tubing, is specified by the OD, and ID depends on the wall thickness; the thickness of the wall of tubing of often expressed in a gauge.


Excellent explanation Ryan.  From your welding class??


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#9 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:19 PM

Tube = mechanical apps
Pipe= fluid transmission
Barrel= finished Id usually to containing something
Cylinder= containing something /mechanical
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#10 Oo-v-oO OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:25 PM

Yes - pipe is commonly formed and welded; tubing used for fluid or air power is drawn and seamless. 

 

That's not to be confused with structural tubing, such as square tube. This is usually formed and welded. 

 

Also, there is a difference, in method of production, but I can't recall.


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#11 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:29 PM


Excellent explanation Ryan.  From your welding class??

 

Howard these young ones are smart.  The other night we were watching Jeopardy and the question was what amendment of the Constitution contains the word Sex?  The wife and I were batting it back and forth & our granddaughter walks though on her way to the kitchen and spit's out the correct answer.  The 19th, woman suffrage. 


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#12 wilberj ONLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:32 PM

The primary difference between pipe and tubing is how the size is designated. Pipe is designated by a "Nominal Pipe Size" based upon the ID (inside diameter) of the most common wall thickness. Tubing is designated by the measured OD (outside diameter). For Example: A 3/4 inch iron pipe has an OD of 1.050 inches, while a 3/4 inch steel tube has an OD of 0.75 inches.

The Copper industry calls all cooper tubular products "Tubes" but they designate a "Type". Each type has specified OD and ID dimensions



Read more: http://wiki.answers....e#ixzz2HoKtAB1A

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#13 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 07:49 PM

Howard these young ones are smart.  The other night we were watching Jeopardy and the question was what amendment of the Constitution contains the word Sex?  The wife and I were batting it back and forth & our granddaughter walks though on her way to the kitchen and spit's out the correct answer.  The 19th, woman suffrage. 

All of the "young-uns" that make their way to this site are very smart, no question.  Something about the way Ryan worded his answer made me wonder if it came from one of his text books, but it wouldn't surprise me if he knew it.


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#14 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 08:06 PM

All of the "young-uns" that make their way to this site are very smart, no question.  Something about the way Ryan worded his answer made me wonder if it came from one of his text books, but it wouldn't surprise me if he knew it.

Thank you Howard!

 

Earlier this week I did a unit called "structural shapes" and it gave the basic differences. I will try to get a scan of the page, it is kinda hard to explain how it is layed out. In my previous post, that was my wording and what I remembered from that unit as well as some stuff I already knew.


Edited by Ryan313, January 11, 2013 - 08:07 PM.

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#15 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 08:34 PM

I could not get the scanner to work, so I had to just take a picture of the page. Hopefully this will further answer the opening question also! (click for larger picture)

 

EDIT: The part on the bottom of the page has nothing to do with the topic here.

 

0E3DD399-FACC-43C8-BBE0-3FD8BB014FA4-282


Edited by Ryan313, January 11, 2013 - 08:35 PM.

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