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Must Needed Tools For The Gt Enthusiast


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#91 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 05:39 PM

What are you using to compile your list?  Spreadsheet, Document?  Either make an image of the list and post as an image or post the file.

I just posted a partial list using a .pdf. I am using Word and using a table within Word to compile the list. When all is said and done I will post as a .pdf file unless there is another option where people can click to view it on GTTalk somewhere. I'll look for your feedback when I've got the list completed.


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#92 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 05:40 PM

Now that I'm heading down this path, brands or even websites (urls) would be nice if you've got them. Thanks.



#93 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 05:41 PM

That looks good to me, Thanks for doing this!


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#94 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 05:52 PM

Here is a few more for carb cleaning:  Torch cleaners (extra small round files, might have been mentioned), soak tank, Qtips for cleaning float needle seat. Expert level...ultra sonic cleaner tank.

 

Painting stuff: tarp/bisqueen/drop cloth/plastic sheet, Funnel/strainer, stir sticks, tack cloth, respirator/dust mask, heat lamp, disposable rags ( I like the box of "heavy duty paper towels")

 

Extra shop stuff: Oil dry (dirt and dry grass clippings work good too).

Someone mentioned a radio..well I'll see that and raise you satellite tv and a big screen for watching the race or game. And for extreme multitasking while wrenching and watching the race and emptying beer cans... a smoker and a 15 pound brisket and/ or a few slabs of ribs with a dozen brauts for lunch while cooking the brisket


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#95 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 05:54 PM

Haven't seen it yet but it is a must have for rebuilding an engine - a gap gauge set.


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#96 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 06:03 PM

That looks really good Moosetales.  I'm not quite so sure about putting brands because most everyone will have their favorites.  But if others want to list brands I'm fine with it.

 

Once you have it the way you want it a PDF is fine.  I was just asking because I thought you were having a problem posting it into the thread.  Your doing a great job so don't let me interfere. :thumbs:

 

Rat mentioned oil dry, kitty litter works great for cleaning up oil spills I know all to well! :(


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#97 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 11:27 PM

Rat mentioned oil dry, kitty litter works great for cleaning up oil spills I know all to well! :(

I use saw dust from the wood shop at home.

 

 The list is looking good Moosetales :thumbs:


Edited by Nato77, January 14, 2013 - 11:27 PM.

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#98 Jack OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2013 - 11:57 PM

   This is one of my favorite tool sites.  Good prices and good stuff.

 

 

 

http://www.tsitool.com/


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#99 HydroHarold ONLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2013 - 12:37 AM

...at least 2 different gauges of "tie/baling wire", one stiff one fairly flexible.

 

I'm a "gear hose clamp" gearhead!  4" on up are so handy for fabrication positioning and quick repairs on odd shaped stuff.  I even have a pair of them that are 24" diameter I picked up "just in case".  If you buy all the same brand you can connect them end to end for bigger stuff.

 

And my absolutely favorite universal shop tool... (2) Black & Decker Workmates.  I don't do "heavy duty vehicle" repairs anymore so I don't need a honkin' big work bench.  I have not found any tractor, mower or attachment repairs that can't be done on one or both.  I also made a table top of plywood with a lug screwed/glued to it that will clamp into it and another similar mount for my medium sized vise.  Plus they fold up quick and store out of the way...

 

EAR PROTECTION, plugs or muffs!!!  "Eyes and ears!" for cutting and grinding.  It only takes a second to put them on just like goggles.

 

Carbide scratch awls, center punches for accurate drilling ( I LOVE my automatic one!)... and don't forget one standard and one metric henway!


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#100 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2013 - 12:58 AM

...at least 2 different gauges of "tie/baling wire", one stiff one fairly flexible.

 

I'm a "gear hose clamp" gearhead!  4" on up are so handy for fabrication positioning and quick repairs on odd shaped stuff.  I even have a pair of them that are 24" diameter I picked up "just in case".  If you buy all the same brand you can connect them end to end for bigger stuff.

 

And my absolutely favorite universal shop tool... (2) Black & Decker Workmates.  I don't do "heavy duty vehicle" repairs anymore so I don't need a honkin' big work bench.  I have not found any tractor, mower or attachment repairs that can't be done on one or both.  I also made a table top of plywood with a lug screwed/glued to it that will clamp into it and another similar mount for my medium sized vise.  Plus they fold up quick and store out of the way...

 

EAR PROTECTION, plugs or muffs!!!  "Eyes and ears!" for cutting and grinding.  It only takes a second to put them on just like goggles.

 

Carbide scratch awls, center punches for accurate drilling ( I LOVE my automatic one!)... and don't forget one standard and one metric henway!

 

I'm about to learn something tonight. What's a standard and metric henway? Thanks for sharing.



#101 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2013 - 01:17 AM

Okay guys, here's THE LIST. Please give me feedback regarding my guess at whether a tool is geared towards "Novice", "Advanced" or "Just Nice to Have". Oh, and let me know if we've missed a tool we all use and love but have somehow left off the list.

 

I designed this so it can be printed off and used to keep track of what you Need, Want and Have; in the left most column indicate whether you N, W or H the corresponding tool.

 

Enjoy.

 

Attached File  GTTalk Tool Kit (1).pdf   210.64KB   35 downloads


Edited by Moosetales, January 15, 2013 - 01:23 AM.

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#102 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2013 - 01:37 AM

I am not sure that it would be considered a "tool" but the 50/50 acetone/ATF homebrew rust buster is real handy.

 

Entering into the tire rasslin arena:

Bead breaker, tire spoon, valve stem tool, tire/ tube patch kit, bug sprayer filled with soapy water, angle grinder with flapper disc and tire slime

 

Hey rat88,

 

What do you use the "flapper disc" for when you are "rasslin" your tires? I've included it in the list but need an explanation to include in the list. Thanks.



#103 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2013 - 01:45 AM

One more thing. I plan on adding (or editing) the list as we go along and will be saving each version as GTTalk Tool Kit (____).pdf; each version will increase in number starting with 1 and moving on up. Also, if you look at the footer in each .pdf you'll see a Revised date/time so you can keep each version separate.

 

Since posting #1 I've received more feedback so here's #2.

 


Attached File  GTTalk Tool Kit (2).pdf   221.66KB   27 downloads

 

Enjoy.


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#104 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2013 - 02:08 AM

Wow, Matt great list and after reading it ,  realize I got about 99% of the list, even got doubles on many :D


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#105 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2013 - 03:03 AM

Well after reading though all this i see that one  thing missed was ..........a plan?  when ever we start to do a project, we start with a plan of where we would like it  to end up, and build from there. . The first part of our plan would be to do as much research on the item as we can,,, find books, manuals and etc, so we can get the knowlage we need to move forwards with the plan. All these cool tools and other support items are great, but they have to start with a plan and the knowlage of the machinary first. I see alot of new guys who go gun ho, out and buy something, get tools and then start looking for parts right away before they have sat down and formed any kind of a plan of ....what will it cost?, How much time is it going to take?, what if i lose interest in it?. I'm not sure one could really over plan on rebuilding something. 

 

This is a good thread, and if one needed a huge list of tools and other bits to buy, heres the place to look for it.  But because i hate to look at the craig's list and eBay ad's, where someone has to sell off his dream because it cost to much or its taken over his life. please start with a plan of attack, as your first tool.


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