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Must Needed Tools For The Gt Enthusiast


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#16 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:37 PM

While we are heading down this road, what NOT to buy is just as important as what TO buy.

Is it just me or does most of the phillips head screw drivers completely suck? They dont fit the screw heads right anymore and wear out too fast, damaging the screw and you end up drilling off the head. Proto/ Stanley seems to be the worst, but craftsman isnt much better.

Bluepoint from Snap-on......the best you will ever find......


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#17 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 01:42 PM

Duct tape and a 5# hammer-why- just to have.

 

Dick


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#18 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 01:47 PM

OK my two cents. Do not waste your money on low quality, cheaper tools even if "I only need it one time". That one time can cost you more in frustration than buying the right tool. As far as screwdrivers go it is hard to beat Klein. Craftsman has worked most of the time for me on other tools. A 48 oz cross pein hammer and some short 2x4 scraps can be a wonderful stress reliever. Just sweep up the splinters after you have beat the crap out of them. :smilewink:


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#19 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 02:32 PM

A few things I use all the time

 

Dead blow hammer (HF has the orange ones and the heads are full of sand) great when you need the force but don't want to bang up your work.

 

Brass Drift punches: Great for driving things like bearing races when you don't want to chance gouging or scratching the bore.

 

bearing and seal driver kits: I use these all the time. How many of us ruined seals because it wasn't straight when going in?

 

honing stones: For me these are one of the most used tools I use when assembling or rebuilding. whether it is to debur as surface or remove high spots from a gasket surface.

 

file set and file cleaning brush: These are common, but don't forget a file cleaning brush. It doesn't take much to clog a file, especially on aluminum.

 

emery cloth: a must for polishing shafts and cleaning parts.

 

feeler gages:  a must for adjusting valve lash, points etc..

 

Torque wrenches: If you plan on doing an engine rebuild these are a must have! (inch and Foot pounds)

 

*Calipers and micrometers: At minimum I would get a set of calipers for measuring parts, If you are not familiar with using them buy a digital set. These are rather important when doing a restore! Being a lot of these old GT's are hard to get parts for in many cases you will have to measure bearings, bushings and seal to find or make an alternative part.

 

These are just a few of the things I myself use all the time.


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#20 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 02:41 PM

Being "middle aged", I find a strong magnifying glass indispensable.


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#21 lyall OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 02:53 PM

several good gas cans - 1 gal., 2.5 gal and 5 gal tank

hate driving the garden tractor 10 blocks to the gas station for 2 gallons of gas

 

portable air tank


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#22 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 02:55 PM

I have collected many of the specialty tools at fleamarkets and tag sales. You will be surprised how many are in the old tool boxes that are "$10 with contents". A real handy tool I have goes between the spark plug and its wire. It lights up when the plug gets a spark. Saves alot of time when trouble shooting.


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#23 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 03:17 PM

The inline spark light test lights are good if you know how to read them. A weak spark will look good to the untrained eye. I use these for a quick check, but will also test with an adjustable "dummy" plug. A strong ignition system should be able to jump a .500 gap
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#24 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 03:25 PM

... and a digital camera ...


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#25 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 03:26 PM

On the subject of screws and drivers, I find my cordless Ryobi impact driver priceless.  I rarely strip a screw, since I am able to hold the tool firmly against the screw head while the tool does it's impact thing and either loosens or tightens the screw.  Works for phillips, slotted, and small hex such as 1/4 and 5/16.


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#26 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 03:27 PM

A lot of folks are mentioning screwdrivers, especially phillips.  I want to mention that the most trouble that I have had wasn't the driver but the wrong sized driver or even the wrong type.  For instance, a #8 or #10 screw uses a # 2 phillips head.  Use a # 1 driver and you will ruin both the screw head and the screwdriver head.

A drywall screw uses a # 2 bit.  I was going through bits once on a job and someone kindly pointed out that I had the wrong type of bit.  Huh?  it's a pointed, # 2 bit.  It said ph2 on it.  He handed me a new bit that didn't flare out as wide and had 2r on it.  it also was squared on the end.  Both #2 phillips, each working well with different screws.  That squared off bit worked great on drywall screws but didn't work well with stainless steel screws.

Usually, if the tip fits the screw well, it should work well.

I also have a little ratchet, that takes screw bits, that I use sometimes because I can put the correct bit in and tap it with a hammer as I turn the screw out.  That has saved screws, screwdrivers and my sanity many times.


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#27 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 03:39 PM

I think Vice grips are a must have.Also here are some others that i like to use alot,

 

Bearing seperater

harmonic balancer puller

razor blades

 

Last but not least for those of us of age a cold Beer!


Edited by ckjakline, January 11, 2013 - 03:42 PM.

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#28 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 03:46 PM

A lot of folks are mentioning screwdrivers, especially phillips.  I want to mention that the most trouble that I have had wasn't the driver but the wrong sized driver or even the wrong type.  For instance, a #8 or #10 screw uses a # 2 phillips head.  Use a # 1 driver and you will ruin both the screw head and the screwdriver head.

A drywall screw uses a # 2 bit.  I was going through bits once on a job and someone kindly pointed out that I had the wrong type of bit.  Huh?  it's a pointed, # 2 bit.  It said ph2 on it.  He handed me a new bit that didn't flare out as wide and had 2r on it.  it also was squared on the end.  Both #2 phillips, each working well with different screws.  That squared off bit worked great on drywall screws but didn't work well with stainless steel screws.

Usually, if the tip fits the screw well, it should work well.

I also have a little ratchet, that takes screw bits, that I use sometimes because I can put the correct bit in and tap it with a hammer as I turn the screw out.  That has saved screws, screwdrivers and my sanity many times.

 The problem I have is the #2s are too fat to go in the slot and #1s are too pointy to grab good.


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#29 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 03:46 PM

Duct tape and a 5# hammer-why- just to have.

 

Dick

 

They do come in handy at times..:)

 

A simple 12V test light is usually all you need to ring out start circuits or other circuits..  The meter will be necessary for charging systems though..

 

Another handy thing to have is an In-line Spark checker.  **It sure beats asking your kid to hold this wire while you crank the engine** and shows you visually how the spark is without removing the plug while diagnosing..

 

Another handy little tool to use while diagnosing sounds or tic's is the poor mechanic's stethoscope!  A long piece of wood or dowel to listen to the engine in different places and isolate the origin of those little buggers..

 

Feeler gauges are needed for tune-ups and plug gaps along with engine rebuilds.  


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#30 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 04:18 PM

WOW! Keep them coming. I've already picked up on a few tools I would not have thought of and I'm certain to continue learning. I look forward to gathering all these great ideas and putting them under one cover.


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