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Must Needed Tools For The Gt Enthusiast


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#1 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 09:51 AM

Being a nub doesn't mean you don't have a lot of gumption or excitement to dive into the world of garden tractors but it does mean that you might not always know the right tool for the job or you might not anticipate what tools you will need over the course of the life of the hobby.

 

I'm a hiker so I plan a hike with the conditions, terrain, season,etc. in mind. I have lists that help me plan for various hikes, seasons, etc. I'd love to create the same kind of thing for the GT enthusiast's garage.

 

So, I'm starting this thread to educate all of us nubs out there on WHAT WE WILL EVENTUALLY NEED FOR TOOLS IN OUR SHOPS if we plan on tinkering with tractors over the long haul. Please feel free to offer suggestions of tools (makes and models) whether they be large or small, mainstream or obscure, whether we'll use them once or everyday. As always, pics are ALWAYS welcome. At some point my plan is to compile the list we come up with and post the lot. Thanks for sharing.


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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 09:57 AM

This should be interesting! I'll see what comes along and add something later. I have to get ready to work right now.


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#3 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 10:48 AM

my #1 tool (after wreches, sockets...etc) would be an air compressor. That opens up a new chapter in speed and quality of work. Blow guns, air ratchet, impact driver,paint guns, air chisels, DAs / sanders, sand blaster, plasma cutter, plastic welder, air jack and it sure beats the hell out of airing up a 26x12x12 with a bicycle pump.


Edited by rat88, January 11, 2013 - 10:51 AM.

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#4 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 11:10 AM

Well there are many tools that we all consider common from wrenches to screwdrivers.  Common (handy) things are nice if properly used such as torches, welder.  I would like to add one tool that I have found has come in handy a million times over on GT's and Tillers......all kinds of small setups......it would be these handy lil buggers!!

aaa.jpg


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#5 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 11:33 AM

If were are going brand specific on this stuff, these are the best snap ring pliers I have found. They convert from internal to external with a flip of a switch. I got mine from oreillys for about $20.  Kastar 1434

1434.jpg

 

 

Stay away from the cheaper quality snap ring pliers (made in china, buffalo tools kind of stuff) The tips will bend and break, making a simple tool a giant pain in the butt to use.


Edited by rat88, January 11, 2013 - 11:40 AM.

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#6 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 11:47 AM

While we are heading down this road, what NOT to buy is just as important as what TO buy.

Is it just me or does most of the phillips head screw drivers completely suck? They dont fit the screw heads right anymore and wear out too fast, damaging the screw and you end up drilling off the head. Proto/ Stanley seems to be the worst, but craftsman isnt much better.


Edited by rat88, January 11, 2013 - 11:48 AM.

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#7 ol' stonebreaker OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 11:53 AM

While we are heading down this road, what NOT to buy is just as important as what TO buy.

Is it just me or does most of the phillips head screw drivers completely suck? They dont fit the screw heads right anymore and wear out too fast, damaging the screw and you end up drilling off the head. Proto/ Stanley seems to be the worst, but craftsman isnt much better.

  I've found it's usually the chinese made screws more than the drivers.

                                       Mike


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#8 Cat385B OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:07 PM

Without a good electrical tester, ignition/start problems are a nightmare. With a good tester, and a wee bit of knowledge can get you to the root of the problem, rather than throwing new parts at an engine until its fixed.

 

I also think a good two pound hammer is a must have. Mine has a fiberglass handle and a rubber grip. I use it a lot. More than I should, maybe.


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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:15 PM

Without a good electrical tester, ignition/start problems are a nightmare. With a good tester, and a wee bit of knowledge can get you to the root of the problem, rather than throwing new parts at an engine until its fixed.

 

I also think a good two pound hammer is a must have. Mine has a fiberglass handle and a rubber grip. I use it a lot. More than I should, maybe.

Well I think my favorite "Fine Adjustment Tool" (that's what my Machine Shop teacher called them in highschool) is a 3 lb(I think it's called a drill Hammer) I can do finer work with that because it does not bounce(rebound) like a smaller hammer. One good rap does more good than a lot of taps with a ball peen, thing move instead of beeing peened.


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#10 jms180 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:23 PM

how about good meterfluke_179_multimeter-250x3501.jpg


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#11 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:25 PM

Two things I have found priceless is a good flashlight and dentist picks (I think that's what they are called).  I have a flashlight that came with my cordless drill I got over 20 years ago.  I didn't use it much until I started working on GT's and now I can't live with out it.  It has a flat bottom and a swivel head so I can set it down and turn the head to point where I want it.  The battery last's for several hours and there are no cords to mess with.

 

The other tool(s) are some dentist tools I got from HF and I use them contently to work on Carburetors, to get to hard to reach areas tor remove O-rings.

 

Oh one other tool for those of us getting up there.  A magnet on a telescoping  handle to pick up all the bolts, nut's, tools etc you drop.  Saves from having to get on the floor and then find something to help you get back up.  :mad2:


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#12 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:28 PM

Most of you already have the basic hand tools, power tools and such, so I'll touch on the cleaning and cosmetic items. Here is a list of things that I keep handy on my shelves, and use quite often:

 

Cleaners:

1.Majic Erasers - removes scuffs and stains from vinyl seats, and cleans chrome.

2.Rubbing Compound - removes oxidation from original paint surfaces.

3.Polishing Compound - brings back the shine of original paint and smoothes out the paint surface.

4.Simple Green - general cleaner and plastic restorer.

5.Maguires Car Wax and Cleaner - protective cover for tractor finish.

6.Bug and Tar Remover - for removing rust stains on chrome.

7.Easy Off Oven Cleaner - paint and grease remover.

8.Dawn Dishwashing Liquid - for removing greasey residue from freshly stripped parts, and as lubricant for tire installation.

9.Armorall - rubber, plastic, and wiring harness restorer.

10.Comet Powder - tire cleaning agent.

11.SOS Pads with the Pink Soap - aluminum cleaner.

12.#0000 Steel Wool - aluminum cleaner and polisher.

13.WD-40 - lubricant, chrome cleaner, and aluminum polisher.

14.Nevr-Dull - chrome, brass, copper, aluminum, and nickel polisher.

15.Mothers Chrome Cleaner - self explanitory.

16.Penetrating Oil - for ease in removing old rusted bolts and nuts.

17.Zip-Strip - paint remover/disolver.

18.Acetone - for cleaning up overspray and for prepping surfaces to be painted. 

19.100% Mineral Spirits - for cleaning painted surfaces before applying another coat.

 

 

Miscellaneous Tools:

1.Toothbrushes - helping to get into little nooks and crannies.

2.Dentist Picks - for scraping areas of paint that the wire wheel or sand blaster didn't get.

3.Telescopic Magnet - removing nuts and bolts that your arm or hand won't allow you to get to.

4.Cardboard - for inserting bolts into for ease of painting.

5.Painters Masking Tape - for taping off areas that you don't want disturbed.

6.Good Filtered Respirator - for keeping the paint fumes from entering your lungs.

7.Safety Glasses - for keeping the rust out of your eyes while working under your tractor.

8.Big White Blanket - lay it under your work surface, so it's easy to find dropped nuts and bolts.

9.Big Plastic Storage Bins - for storing parts after disassembly.

10.Small and Large Storage Organizers - the various sized drawers come in handy for valve stem cores and caps, carb parts, miscellaneous electrical fittings, miscellaneous knobs, etc.. Organizers are available in numerous sizes and have a variety of drawer quantities and sizes available.

11.Work Gloves - light weight, but heavy to give your hands protecting from sharp edges and high heat.

12.Turkey Baster - for helping to fill transmission while still attached to the tractor frame.

13.Scrub Brush - for cleaning tires.

14.Wire Brush - for cleaning paint overspray from original ties.

15.Small Detail Brushes - for miscellaneous touch up of assembly scatches.

16.Empty Soup Cans - for holding touch up paint.

17.Empty Coffee/Paint Cans - for storing miscellaneous nuts and bolts.

18.Pegboard with Hooks - aids in keeping parts up off the floor, and keeps them on the wall out of the way.

19.Head Mounted Flashlight - frees up your hands to work on other things.

 

These are some ideas as to what I have, and find very useful. You may use some, then again you may not. You may find other items that you come up with, that might be helpful for us! Just enjoy what you're doing, and do the best that you can with what you have.


Edited by johndeereelfman, January 11, 2013 - 12:32 PM.

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#13 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:31 PM

Without a good electrical tester, ignition/start problems are a nightmare. With a good tester, and a wee bit of knowledge can get you to the root of the problem, rather than throwing new parts at an engine until its fixed.

 

I also think a good two pound hammer is a must have. Mine has a fiberglass handle and a rubber grip. I use it a lot. More than I should, maybe.

 When I am dealing with a 40 yearold tractor and I have problems with ignition, starter or what ever, I usually "shot gun" it and replace everything (maybe not the starter unless it really needs it). That way there is no question on whether the condensor or the keyswitch is going bad. In my opinion, that is the only way to do a true " restore" anyway.


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#14 SearsYellow OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:31 PM

I figured I would go thru and put everything in a list that everyone has mentioned and I added a few of my own.

 

 

Air Compressor

-Good 50 foot hose (Where it can be pulled outside to pump up tires)

-Blow guns

-Air Ratchet

-Impact Driver

-Paint Gun

-Air Chisel (something I don't own)

-Sander

-Sand, Soda, Walnut.etc Blaster

 

Welder

-Helmet

-Gloves

-Tips

-Extra Wire

 

Snap Ring Pliers

 

Torque Head Bits or Sockets

 

Electrical Multimeter

 

Mini Sledge

 

3 lb sledge hammer

 

Oxy Acetyl Torch

 

Good Sturdy Jack

 

Jack stands

 

Pry Bar

 

Torque Wrench


Edited by Gumby, January 11, 2013 - 12:32 PM.

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#15 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2013 - 12:34 PM

While we are heading down this road, what NOT to buy is just as important as what TO buy.

Is it just me or does most of the phillips head screw drivers completely suck? They dont fit the screw heads right anymore and wear out too fast, damaging the screw and you end up drilling off the head. Proto/ Stanley seems to be the worst, but craftsman isnt much better.

Working on older things I found the best phillips screw driver is  Cornwell brand. They are better than Snap On even. They hold in the screw better and don't break or round off as easy. They cost a little more than the average ones, but in my opinion its worth it.


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