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Homemade Snow Plow

homemade snow plow white / jacobsen gt

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#46 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2013 - 06:20 PM

Jeff, First, thank you for your service, 

I will get a pic as soon as I can.  Maybe tonight, may be later on in the week.

 

The weight I'm tlking about isn't the odd 100# implement, it's the 200# or more that people sometimes hang on the back, plus their own weight, plus implements.  Just trying to help you keep the ole girl around for another 50 yrs.

 

I appreciate the advice and the kind words.  Since coming into possession of my old tractor, it's brought me a great deal of fun and I would like to hang on to it as long as I can.  I don't know that I'll be around in 50 years, but maybe it will be...

 

Jeff



#47 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2013 - 07:40 PM

You're doing a great job. If you're going to plow a gravel driveway shoes behind the blades' cutting edge will prevent gouging. What are you getting for your next tractor?


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#48 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2013 - 06:58 PM

You're doing a great job. If you're going to plow a gravel driveway shoes behind the blades' cutting edge will prevent gouging. What are you getting for your next tractor?

Thanks boyscout862, my driveway is gravel so I'll have to get onto building the shoes.  Figures I would overlook something.  I just painted the blade today. . .

 

Ever since I was given my tractor, I have been looking at implements, which is how I found this site.  My next project I think will be making a sleeve hitch.  I have found some good drawings on line to help me out. 

 

If I make it myself, my wife won't give me grief about spending money and there is that sense of satisfaction doing it yourself.  However I have seen them on Kijiji for $200 and I can order a brand new one through work for less than $150.  So building from scratch may not seem to be worth the effort, but making my own things is what I think having a hobby is all about.

 

Forgot to answer about the next tractor.  I am trying to do a trade for a 70s Case 210.  They seller wants $300, but it's not running.

 

Jeff


Edited by Watchdog, January 11, 2013 - 10:08 AM.

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#49 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2013 - 07:12 PM

Sorry for the image quality.  I took the pictures with my cell phone and e-mailed them to myself.  Work is really slow right now, so the boss let me do some personal work today. 

 

x92xv.jpg

 

I cleaned up the weld splatter.  Sanded all the surfaces and used some automotive type seam sealer to close the gaps between the stitch welds and hit it with the red oxide primer.

 

i5unwm.jpg

 

Planning on finishing up my cutting edge tomorrow (at work) and thanks to boyscout862, building some shoes.

 

28qiog.jpg

 

The Tremclad Fire Red, goes on nice.  It doesn't match a damn thing on the tractor, but I had the paint and it was a close match to the red on the tubes I made the push frame out of.  When the nice weather comes back, I'll paint it all either Jacobsen Orange or Ford Blue.  My wife likes blue :D.

 

Jeff


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#50 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 09:35 AM

Looking real good. The piece of the blade that you cut off might make a nice center mount plow. They are used for grading driveways. With the blade between the front and back wheels you can make a smooth surface.


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#51 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 10:18 AM

Now Jeff-there is a big difference between the Jacobsen Orange and the Ford blue, gotts to make up your mind. Other than that, that is one nice job, I can kind of relate to what you are doing from my days of working in the welding field.

 

Dick


Edited by JRJ, January 09, 2013 - 10:19 AM.

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#52 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 10:22 AM

You're doing great. Thanks for keeping us posted. BTW, what mechanism will you be using to turn your blade? Now let's hope for you some snow falls on your driveway.


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#53 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 10:23 AM

Looking real good. The piece of the blade that you cut off might make a nice center mount plow. They are used for grading driveways. With the blade between the front and back wheels you can make a smooth surface.

 

I was looking at some in the this forum and thought that it would be an easy project as well.  Also considering a box blade. 

 

I bought a piece of property next to my home and spent a good part of the summer clearing out a good portion of it.  I did a poor job of levelling things with a skid steer.  So my thought was to drag the harrows around when it is all dry again and try to level it better with my old Town & Country and a box blade. 

 

Since seeing the mid-mount grader blade, I think it would be better and easier to see what you are doing.  As well, I think I can come up with a means of applying a little down pressure.

 

Jeff


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#54 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 10:30 AM

You're doing great. Thanks for keeping us posted. BTW, what mechanism will you be using to turn your blade? Now let's hope for you some snow falls on your driveway.

 

Moosetales, I kept that really simple.  It is just a pin to drop into place when I manually angle the blade. 

 

Being able to angle it from the seat is a desirable feature that I might try to add on during the off season when I won't want to use it.  I say "won't want to" because I didn't need this blade at all, as I have a nearly new Husqvarna snow blower, but what's the point in having a capable old tractor if you can't have fun with it.

 

Jeff


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#55 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 12:58 PM

Now Jeff-there is a big difference between the Jacobsen Orange and the Ford blue, gotts to make up your mind. Other than that, that is one nice job, I can kind of relate to what you are doing from my days of working in the welding field.

 

Dick

 

The thing is that fabricating and welding for yourself is alot more fun than doing it professionally. If you've got the know-how, take advantage of it. I weld and fabricate for myself but have no training. Everything takes longer, especially working out the correct welding proceedure. I've used alot of filler on trial welds. Friends that are welders don't even think about it. They just pick the rod, set the welder and make beautiful beads. I admire their knowledge.


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#56 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 03:25 PM

The thing is that fabricating and welding for yourself is alot more fun than doing it professionally. If you've got the know-how, take advantage of it. I weld and fabricate for myself but have no training. Everything takes longer, especially working out the correct welding proceedure. I've used alot of filler on trial welds. Friends that are welders don't even think about it. They just pick the rod, set the welder and make beautiful beads. I admire their knowledge.

 

 

True enough boyscout862.  I took a night school course and have known a few welders over the years who have shared some of their knowledge with me and I am a much better welder because of it.  This probably why I enjoy doing it at home and making things for myself and friends. Did I mention that I find it thirsty work? :beer:

 

At work, I have made welding repairs to some of our rental equipment, which have held up to a lot of abuse.  As a result, my Boss is quick to take on welding jobs for me to do for our customers.  My first winter at his shop he asked me to build a ballast box for a 30 hp John Deere tractor we have that has a front end loader on it.  The wheels are loaded, but customers complained that when the bucket was full the rear end felt really light.  I made a ballast tank out of two 100 lb propane tanks.  Full of water it adds about 650 lbs on the 3 pth.  Again, I made it all out of scrap.  I should post a picture of it.  When it first started coming together it looked like I was building a bomb.

 

Jeff


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#57 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 03:37 PM

Thanks Jeff. Boyscout862s name is Rick. IDK why I haven't cleared that up before. Old Timers I guess.


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#58 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 06:54 PM

Took my push frame to work, cleaned it up a little and started to paint.

 

xpvpms.jpg

 

Red oxide primer first.  I was told by someone a long time ago, that red oxide primer keeps rust at bay longer than others and the red covers it nicely.

 

ieqo9d.jpg

 

Here it is in red.

 

Thanks for following along.

 

Jeff


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#59 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2013 - 07:29 PM

Jeff, it's looking real good. Won't be long now till you are scraping all that pretty paint off it! :bigrofl:


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#60 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2013 - 11:52 PM

Looking great. Glad to see you have a source to paint and work that's out of the cold.






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