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Homemade Snow Plow

homemade snow plow white / jacobsen gt

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#16 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 11:58 AM

I had Jac/white and a lighter blade for snow that mounted on the front of frame where you see those four bolt holes at axle pivot. Was ab 5" tall and made a U-shape for mounting ears on the outer ends. One big A-shaped frame came off those sides. There was a tall ink on righ side and a small channel piece that went back to the manual lift arm on right and just had a swivel clamp there to mount to handle. That way the handle use the notches in that lift to hold blade up. Could adjust clamp up/down as needed to get travel height. There was also a Dozer blade offered that went back to axle or on frame anyway that was tougher. I never found one of those and sold the tractor before I used the snow blade too.

 

P.S. How you gonna cut that tank?   That scares me! Doesn't take much gas or whatever to go BOOM!  I take such items and tanks to a former Marine welder that has all the tricks for cutting tanks. HE can have it!


Edited by glgrumpy, January 01, 2013 - 12:01 PM.

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#17 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 02:22 PM

I decided to take a break for a bite to eat and to see if anyone had an opportunity to offer some pointers.  Needless to say I was very surprised to see all the comments and useful input.  Thanks much to everyone for the encouragement and useful advice.

 

For the time being (because I am anxious to give it a try) the blade will be fixed, but I'll make it so that it can trip when I get my hands on some springs.

 

The propane tank has been devalved and empty for months.  I revalve and recertify propane tanks at work all the time, so I'll share a little of the little bit I know.  According to the scrap yard where we dispose of condemned tanks, they only need to be devalved for 24 hours before you can cut them.  I prefer to wait a little longer, but that is just me being over cautious.  Propane boils at - 42 degrees and expands at a rate of 270%.  So whatever residual propane is left in the tank evaporates almost instantly.

 

I'm going to cut it with an angle grinder with a super thin cutting blade.  I should say blades because I expect it to take a few.

 

When I laminate the pieces it will be to make the blade thicker not longer. 

 

So what I have accomplished so far today, doesn't seem like much.

 

vqimh3.jpg

 

I welded the open ends closed and laid a piece of 1/4 inch flat stock on top and stitch welded it in place.

 

2e31zeq.jpg

 

This is the blade mount in place with the start of the blade position holes.  I have a couple more pictures of the 45 degree holes, but didn't think I needed to add those.

 

mwbed3.jpg

 

While walking by the rear end and seeing the still open tubes, I came up with an idea to add a counter balance on the back end of the push frame.  My thought was that this would add in weight in the rear and make lifting the blade a little easier.

 

As usually, I tend to over think things and started to think that having weight on the rear of th push frame, might make the blade too light.  I think given that the pivot point for the blade is so far back from the blade, that I would have to have a pretty substantial weight on it to really affect the weight of the blade.  Any thoughts? 

 

Well I better get back at it and thanks again for all your comments and input.

 

Jeff


Edited by Watchdog, January 01, 2013 - 04:31 PM.

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#18 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 03:35 PM

I think that your concern about lifting the blade may be valid. Just eyeballing it, but it may be only a ten to one ratio or less. A hundred pound rear weight may lift on the plow by 10 to 20 pounds. That may just end up helping  you lift it. In which case its a win / win situation. My Big Ten uses a counter weight to help lift the plow. Trial and tweeking will probably make it perfect.


Edited by boyscout862, January 01, 2013 - 03:37 PM.

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#19 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 05:19 PM

I'm back again.  Had to call it a day.  The turkey is ready and I know I won't get back to my project after a turkey dinner.

 

I cut the collar and foot ring off my tank and drew on lines to cut it in half.

 

x63jc.jpg

 

Not a bad start to my cut.  Those super thin cutting disks make it so easy to do nice, clean cuts.

 

aw9av9.jpg

 

I stood the tank back onto the foot ring to satbilize it while I made my cuts. Even cut completely in half the two parts stood in the foot ring without falling over.

 

20fb69z.jpg

 

It's surprising how clean these tanks are.  This one is 24 years old.

 

Now I have to think about the next step.  My original thought was to leave the tank ends in place to help keep the snow on the blade.  Now that I see how tight the radius is, I don't think it'll work out that way.  I'll need to cut the ends off so the plow can spring open. 

 

As it stands the tank halves are 15 inches wide.  Is this close to the height of a proper plow?  I'll have to look into the dimensions so I don't have something too big for my tractor to push when it's loaded with snow.

 

Needless to say I was a little optimistic in my previous post when I suggested I would be done today and painting tomorrow.

 

Jeff


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#20 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 05:29 PM

Jeff,

 

Don't feel bad.....I can't tell you how many times I've had GREAT HOPES of finishing a project in short order only to run into those unexpected gremlins that get in the way of quick and easy. BTW, I agree with you cutting the ends of the tank out.....this way you'll be able to angle your plow and let excess snow slide out the ends. Looking good. Thanks for keeping us posted before you entered the "turkey zone". :thumbs:


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#21 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 06:31 PM

It is looking good Jeff, you should feel good with the amount of work you completed so far, I know I would.  And there is always those little things that you didn't plan for that pop up, or things don't go the way you expect them to, but like I said "it looks like you got the tiger by the tail".

 

Dick


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#22 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 08:00 PM

Jeff, Its looking good. 15" is about the height of the plow on my Snapper that is 16hp. I was wondering how thick the wall of the tank is? If its better than 3/32" you probably don't need to double it up. Just reinforce it with ribs and a soldier beam across the back. A replaceable cutting edge is a good idea. I've used old leaf springs, heated, staightened and skip welded on to the plow. It stiffens it up alot too. Shoes under the blade will reduce gouging gravel driveways. Keep up the good work.


Edited by boyscout862, January 01, 2013 - 09:31 PM.

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#23 Watchdog OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 08:29 AM

I finally got back at it yesterday.  Unlike my lovely wife who is off until Monday, I had to go back to work this past Wednesday. 

 

My original plan was to double up the thickness of the blade by laminating the two halves together, however once the end caps were cut off this left me with only a 33 inch blade.  Needless to say 33 inches doesn't make for much of a plow blade, so I went with longer insted of thicker.  The thickness of the material is a little better than 1/8th.  A friend has a plow on his atv and the blade material isn't even 1/8th, so I am hopeful that mine will be adequate.

 

w0m4wg.jpg

 

I cut a strip to reinforce the weld between the two halves and to align the endcuts as perfect as I could.

 

mj1irk.jpg

 

The two halves lined up and ready for some stitch welds.  Once everything is all assembled and functional, I'll weld everything more solid. Along the backside I have a length of 2" angle iron welded in place to support the overall length of the blade (I'll take more complete pictures today).

 

vn00fp.jpg

 

Here it is inplace. I have to trim some of the curve off the top side as I don't think it'll be very functional with such a tight curve coming so far forward.

 

Also, I'm thinking the 50 inch length may be a little too long.  Measuring from centre, with the plow angled, it needs to be 42 inches (overall length) to clear the edge of the front wheels.  48 inches will clear the edges of the back wheels, so I went with 50.  How long is the average plow blade?

 

More to follow this afternoon.  Thanks for reading and providing the helpful tips.

 

Jeff


Edited by Watchdog, January 06, 2013 - 08:33 AM.

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#24 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 08:48 AM

Your moving along well on this. The bend is a bit tight, but functional. 48" is a normal width, but if you have the material, 50" would give you room to add wheel weights outside your rims. Good luck with it!


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#25 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 09:03 AM

Looks like a well thought out, well made project. I think the plows I have are around 46-48" with the exception of the one on my GT6000. It's 54 + rubber "wings" i put on it. overall is about 65" (I think) and as long as you get the snow when it's not to deep, it's no problem. Wet heavy stuff can be an issue, but only with traction, not power. I assume you are planning on weights and chains on the wheels? You will want them with that much blade.
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#26 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 09:28 AM

After reading Alan's comments, you might want to go 54" wide to allow for weights. Plus, if you angle the blade, you're still taking a wide enough swath for the tractor to get through. Just a thought!


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#27 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 09:33 AM

Your plow length is good. Your project is looking great! You are a good fabricator.

 

Mine is 50 and I am able to push well even when the snow is wet. You will want wheel weights for sure and the chains were on in the pic. Extra weight besides the wheels won't hurt either.  Just my 2 cents. 

 

 

 

Geno


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#28 tractorman604 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 09:55 AM

Look's like that will last a lifetime. Nice solid work.


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#29 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 11:05 AM

I know for some of the big road rigs they purposefully have a tight curve to the blade which I believe allows for the excess snow to be re-routed back into the path of the blade when going at higher speeds. So I say, leave the bend, put a V8 in your tractor and rev her up. You'll be done with your drive in no time.

Your project is coming along and a great read. Thanks.

Edited by Moosetales, January 06, 2013 - 11:06 AM.

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#30 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2013 - 12:30 PM

Jeff,

 

Please accept this ONLY as something I ran across today NOT that your build is lacking or missing anything. Just another resource.

 

mother_earth_blade.jpg

 

Here's the website the above pic came from:

 

http://vintagesearsg...rear_blade.html

 

Matthew


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