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Wheel "home Made" Weights


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#1 Tankman OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 10:43 AM

Some simple "home made" wheel weights.

1) Measure rim ID, where you want or need weights
2) Grab a pair of sized cast brake drums from your junqie
3) Carriage bolts from Home "Cheapo" or your local hardware store
4) Drill holes, center to center dimension to line up with your rim mounting holes
5) Put the carriage bolts in the drums
6) Add concrete, dry

You're all set to go. Paint as required! :thumbs:

Wheel_Weights.jpg
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#2 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 11:51 AM

Great idea! I'd bet if you had the time you could even stamp a logo of your choice in them before they would dry. About how much do they weigh?

#3 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 11:53 AM

How much weight does that end up being? And I assume the metal portion is what is exposed?

Looks good anyway,

#4 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 12:04 PM

Those look very professional! What make and model vehicle did the drums come off of, they appear to be a close fit to the wheels!

#5 HankS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 12:23 PM

How much weight does that end up being? And I assume the metal portion is what is exposed?

Looks good anyway,


I would say the concrete is exposed. The steel drum has holes for the hub and wheel studs which may line up with the hub and bolts on the tractor.. The carriage bolts are also sticking out of the steel drum side which has to go up against the wheel.

#6 Tankman OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 01:15 PM

I would say the concrete is exposed. The steel drum has holes for the hub and wheel studs which may line up with the hub and bolts on the tractor.. The carriage bolts are also sticking out of the steel drum side which has to go up against the wheel.


The concrete is exposed. Carriage bolts are installed in holes that you drill to fit your rim.

The cast drums are piled at the junk yard, measure and pick up a pair to fit your rims.
Put some paper in the drum to hold the 'crete when pouring.

You mix a bucket of cement with aggregate (stone) to make the weights heavier. Or, put stone, bolts, nuts, whatever in the drum before adding the 'crete. These look great when painted Wheel Horse red of course! :dancingbanana:

Edited by Tankman, December 23, 2012 - 01:17 PM.

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#7 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 01:38 PM

Nice. :thumbs: ....Did you leave some of the bolt stick out long enough to allow it to be in the concrete?

I would be afraid the concrete would "fall" out of the drums if something wasn't holding the drum & concrete together. Maybe that is why my wife & kids call me "Overkill Ken". :wave:

#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 03:33 PM

Those look really good. I like to cast stuff in concrete as well. It's not as heavy as steel but a whole lot easier to work with.

#9 chris m ONLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 03:44 PM

They came out great. That is a good way to get plenty of weight on the rears and not have to spend a ton on weights :thumbs:

#10 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 04:07 PM

That looks like a very good method! Thanks for sharing! They came out great!

#11 Tankman OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2012 - 04:56 PM

Nice. :thumbs: ....Did you leave some of the bolt stick out long enough to allow it to be in the concrete?

I would be afraid the concrete would "fall" out of the drums if something wasn't holding the drum & concrete together. Maybe that is why my wife & kids call me "Overkill Ken". :wave:


You could leave the bolt out into the drum a bit but, hold it out with a nut 'n washer.
If not, drill the hole a bit small to hammer the square carriage bolt into the brake drum. Works great. :thumbs:

Bolts could be installed from the outside of the drum. Inside the drum some "leftover" thread.
That'll give some added foot hold for the 'crete. Too simple.

Edited by Tankman, December 23, 2012 - 04:59 PM.





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