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What Is The Name For This Part?


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#1 New.Canadian.DB.Owner ONLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 04:29 PM

I'm trying to repair the bracket that goes around the Hydrostatic Cooler on my Allis Chalmers HB112. The bracket wore through & / or cracked on the bottom. When I removed it, two of the three bolts on the top where seized. I had to grind the heads off and, as you can see, I over ground the "nuts". I call them nuts, but only because I don't know the proper name & therefore can't buy replacements. Any idea what they are called?


cooler bracket 3.jpg cooler bracket 1.jpg cooler bracket 2.jpg cooler bracket 4.jpg cooler bracket 5.jpg cooler bracket 6.jpg

#2 ol' stonebreaker OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 04:41 PM

From what I can tell in the pics they're not hurt. If they're beyond use just drill them out so the screw will slip thru them and tack another nut to them. If the side I'm looking at goes toward the cooler then grind them down flush after reaming them and tack a nut over the hole. Run a screw thru the nut and tighten it down before tacking and put some grease on the screw threads to keep gobbers from sticking to the threads.
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#3 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 04:50 PM

Sleeve nuts are what I call them. :anyone:
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#4 New.Canadian.DB.Owner ONLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 04:50 PM

Thanks for the suggestions, Mike. Here is a better picture of the damage. The two damaged "nuts" are not fixed into position & spin freely. The bracket is aluminum, and I can't weld aluminum with my set up. I might be able to aluminum braze a nut on top, but I don't know if that will work.

cooler bracket 7.jpg

#5 New.Canadian.DB.Owner ONLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 05:07 PM

Sleeve nuts are what I call them. :anyone:


Many thanks, Steve! While they aren't called sleeve nuts, you did send me searching in a new direction. I think they might be called Rivet nuts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkPhGIaPCVs

Then again, maybe not ... Mine don't look mushroomed on the under side. Still they may work if I can't find the correct name ...

Edited by New.Canadian.DB.Owner, December 14, 2012 - 05:21 PM.


#6 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 05:10 PM

If the "nut" spins, maybe it is an insert, and not a "welded" into place nut. See the link:
http://www.grainger....0071&sst=subset

You guys beat me to the answer...I was looking while you were typing!

Edited by KC9KAS, December 14, 2012 - 05:11 PM.

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#7 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 06:07 PM

Toro uses a bunch of them and they call them a nut insert. Their's are usually serrated where they contact the metal to help keep them from spinning.
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#8 Guest_gravely-power_*

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 06:21 PM

They're called "Nutserts". I have a large kit and have used it for years. Here is a link.

http://www.aircrafts...es/nutserts.php
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#9 ol' stonebreaker OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 06:46 PM

How about having someone tig weld a peice 3/16" or however thick you think you can fit in there x 3/4"x 1" long (don't know the metric equiv) over the holes then drill and tap it.
Mike
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#10 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2012 - 11:13 PM

They're called "Nutserts". I have a large kit and have used it for years. Here is a link.

http://www.aircrafts...es/nutserts.php


Would you be willing to start a topic about nutserts....unless there is already one out there? I'm interested in their application regarding GTs. I've never heard of these but my quick search has turned up some interesting tidbits. If you'd prefer, a quick PM would suffice but I'm guessing others might enjoy the read since you've clearly had much experience with them. Thanks.
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#11 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2012 - 12:16 AM

There are a few different nutserts out there that have been used over ther years. Most seemed to compress with tightening the first time like a pop rivet. Some used a tool that did the same thing... I think this is what you have.

Let me look a little, I did find this pic that shows thin and thick metal differences but they are both the rivet tool kind.
Posted Image
Let me see if I can find the ones that use the bolt.
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#12 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2012 - 12:42 AM

The ones that don't use the tool have a nut built into the top. Definitely not what you have.

I believe the generic, technical term for what you have is "wedge head rivet nut"

Posted Image
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#13 mjodrey ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2012 - 05:28 AM

I use those for a lot of things.I have the tool ,and a whole raft of different size nutserts.Both in metric and standard.

Edited by mjodrey, December 18, 2012 - 10:19 AM.

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#14 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted December 16, 2012 - 10:09 AM

I've used some of this type--Blind-hole threaded fastener and those with serated shoulder never seemed to hold up well. Those Allen and Maynard are referring to-with the rivot-tool install grip better.

The best clue is the absence of wrench flats, and accessability or thin material indicates that they probably weren't intended to spin. Irronically, I was looking for some yesterday at Fastenal, but got distracted and never made it to the store.

Edited by Toolpartzman, December 16, 2012 - 10:27 AM.

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