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Rust removal using molasses


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#1 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 26, 2010 - 01:15 PM

I discovered something interesting,you can use molasses to dissolve rust from metal parts.I don't know if or how well this works,but
if you were to google this,you would find quite a few articles on this.
Here is a short video on this topic.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhXcwRyGVsU

Here is a link to just one of the many articles about this:


http://www.ehow.com/...t-molasses.html

Edited by mjodrey, August 26, 2010 - 03:05 PM.


#2 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted August 26, 2010 - 06:01 PM

Suppose for a second that you wanted to do this.

You would need a 55 gallon plastic drum, 3 gallons of molasses and 42 gallons of water to come up with 54 gallons of mixture. The molasses will cost you $39.00 for the 3 gallons if you buy it in a case of 4 one gallon jugs for $52.00. You have to leave this mixture alone for a month to let it cook. Then after removing the skin off the top, you can drop your rusty junk into the drum but you have to wait another month for the process to work.

Interesting video and website but at my age, I can't afford to wait that long nor would I want to spend that much money for a mixture that will need to be replaced far too soon, IMO. I wonder it they were thinking about this process when the phrase "slower than molasses in July" became popular?:D

#3 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 26, 2010 - 06:33 PM

I know exactly what you mean by the wait.I just came across this today and thought since I had not heard of this process,maybe others hadn't either.I don't think that I would ever try it,although you never know.The guy in the video says to use farm grade molasses,I am guessing because it is cheaper than molasses you would buy in a grocery store.Anyway,I just found it interesting.

#4 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 26, 2010 - 10:20 PM

Don't know if I would use it, either, but it is an interesting application. Especially if you had an available source for the farm grade molasses.

Thanks for sharing the video, Maynard

#5 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted August 26, 2010 - 10:47 PM

Oh boy....I have farm grade molasses by the ton. We feed "Pro-lix" molasses to our cows & heifers in lick wheel tanks. We feed about 10,000lb every month or so. Sounds like a sticky situation to get into though! It costs 15 cents per pound.

#6 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 04:36 AM

If anyone here does actually try this,please let us know how good it really works.

#7 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 05:28 AM

For sure, it's an alternative method for rust removal and I thank Maynard for bringing it to our attention.

When assessing these methods, I tend to look at all the factors involved. So far, the electrolysis process looks very good to me. I'm sure that I could find farm grade molasses around here somewhere although I've never heard of it being discussed nor have I seen it for sale. Southern Ontario has some of the finest Class 1 agricultural land in the world and there's not much farming activity that is not engaged in here, climate permitting.

To me, this method is just too slow, too complex and too labour intensive compared to the electrolysis. As Dan implied, dealing with molasses is a very sticky situation. Even though the molasses has been diluted by a ratio of seven to one, you still have to use copious amounts of hot water combined with scrubbing to remove it from the part/s being treated. To me, that isn't a fun job, especially if there are tight, hard to reach areas that you eventually want to coat with paint to make sure that rust does not return.

With the electrolysis, you remove the item from the tank, rinse it clean with cold water and dry it as quickly as possible so it can be primed. And of course, the electrolysis method takes anywhere from a few hours to a couple days, tops. Being forced to wait 30 days for the same result isn't my idea of a sweet deal.:D

#8 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 06:12 AM

This system can work pretty well. I have used it on a small scale for old tools and a couple of railroad lantern frames. I did not have time constraints and did not want to use electrolysis in my basement in the winter. A five gallon bucket with cover [vented] left in the corner of my basement "shop" for a couple weeks and then a quick brush off under warm water and they came out pretty clean. Rapid recoat with something, even a wipe down with oil is VITAL as they will flash rust right in front of your eyes...... I would not want to use it on a large piece, but for small parts with time to let them sit, it worked well.
Peter

#9 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 06:51 AM

Peter: Good to hear that this application works. Thanks for sharing your experiences with using it.

#10 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 06:59 AM

Here is another interesting product.
Evapo-rust rust remover gallery

#11 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 07:24 AM

Peter: Good to hear that this application works. Thanks for sharing your experiences with using it.

:ditto:
Thanks Peter.

#12 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 07:34 AM

Oh boy....I have farm grade molasses by the ton. We feed "Pro-lix" molasses to our cows & heifers in lick wheel tanks. We feed about 10,000lb every month or so. Sounds like a sticky situation to get into though! It costs 15 cents per pound.


OH OH.
It looks like those cows are going to be missing one of there Pro-Lix tanks.:bigrofl::bigrofl::bigrofl::bigrofl:

#13 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 08:12 AM

Here is another interesting product.
Evapo-rust rust remover gallery



Thanks ducky. I'm glad that members are coming forward with these various methods of cleaning parts. So far, I have yet to see anything that will sway me from path to pursue the electrolysis process that Dan so kindly brought to our attention. I found it interesting that in one part of the evaporust website they warn the reader about flash rust after using their product but in the comparison chart, the claim is made that flash rust isn't a problem and therefore that's one of the benefits of evaporust.

Hmmmmmm. Contradictory statements don't impress me. When looking at that same chart and examining the so-called negatives of the electrolysis method, I see absolutely nothing that gives me pause for concern either. I already know what it's going to cost me to build my tank and set up my operation and it's peanuts compared to the costs they cite. Sure the solution is somewhat caustic but so what? A full face-shield and a pair of industrial quality rubber gloves easily take care of that. And since my tank will sit outside 365 days each year, the tiny amount of hydrogen gas produced isn't of any concern.

From a cost standpoint, it certainly appears to me that the electrolysis method has the evaporust process beat six ways to Sunday and to me, that's a factor that weighs heavily in its favour.

#14 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 10:41 AM

Here is another interesting product.
Evapo-rust rust remover gallery


ducky,
Thanks for posting that link.

#15 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 27, 2010 - 04:57 PM

ducky,
Thanks for posting that link.


:ditto: Looks like a good product too. Like hydriv stated... looks like the electrolysis is the most cost effective application so far.




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