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Should I Use Jbweld Or Similar?

fuel tank damage jbweld

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10 replies to this topic

#1 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 04, 2012 - 03:04 PM

Now, I realize there are some people who will say "Of course you should use JBWeld, it'll fix anything!". Hear me out first.

I drive a Ford F-150 with a two piece driveshaft and a center bearing carrier. This morning, the carrier strap broke, and the driveshaft pushed sideways and began rubbing on the fuel tank and a metal shield which protects the gas tank. It rubbed a hole in the metal shield, and began to rub away at the plastic fuel tank, but did not actually puncture all the way through. I'm thinking of putting some JBweld down on the plastic, then perhaps using more JBWeld to attach a peice of sheetmetal. I've attached a photo. I'd like to know if you think this will work, because I really can't afford to replace the gas tank.


As for the broken strap which began all this, Ford decided to make the center bearing non-servicable. The bearing is trapped behind the yoke, and you have to replace the entire driveshaft. I'm thinking of just trying to find a replacement center strap and using that for a while. Anyone else have any experience with this? 20004, F-150, 8ft bed, two piece driveshaft.
Gas tank hole.jpg

#2 ol' stonebreaker ONLINE  

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Posted December 04, 2012 - 03:09 PM

Get the price of the new driveline. See if a replacement brg is available and price it. Take the old driveline to a driveline repair shop. See what they'll charge to chuck it in the lathe, cut the yoke weld, replace the brg and weld yoke back on the shaft.
As for the gas tank, I'd clean the area off good w/ acetone and build it back up w/ gasket silicone. I think the JB is too brittle to apply to a surface like a plastic gas tank. Pop rivet a peice of sheet metal to the shield.
Mike

Edited by ol' stonebreaker, December 04, 2012 - 03:14 PM.

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#3 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 04, 2012 - 03:16 PM

New Ford Driveline-$1000- Non-servicable yokes, marked "Scrap if Dropped" by manufacturer.

Local machine shop-Quoted $450 to make the attempt to repair. Ford DOES NOT have spare bearings.

This place: http://www.driveshaf...sure Sheet.html
should be able to build one for about $750 delivered.

#4 1978murray OFFLINE  

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Posted December 04, 2012 - 04:58 PM

use water weld. its amazing stuff. it is gas resistant and i think it better with gas than JBweld
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#5 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted December 04, 2012 - 05:17 PM

I agree with Mike on fixing the tank and shield. Try the stuff 1978Murray is talking about.

I have a friend who had the same problem about 2 years ago. He took it to a shop that specialized in drive shafts. They fixed him up for about $150 (I think) and as far as I know he is still driving it today.(He got married and moved to the other side of town).
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#6 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted December 04, 2012 - 05:26 PM

I have had good luck patching plastic boats with "Monkey Grip Bead Sealer". It is a liquid rubber type stuff. Put on a coat and let it dry, then do another coat, repeat until built up to required thickness.

I dont know how compatible this stuff is with gas, but if it is not leaking now, it should keep it from cracking or leaking in the future.

EDIT: I apply it to a horizontal surface. trying to keep it from running down the side of the tank might be a challenge

Edited by rat88, December 04, 2012 - 05:31 PM.

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#7 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2012 - 07:35 AM

I'll have to look up the Monkey Weld, but if the tank is intact, you wouldn't have an issue with the sealer being compatible with gas.
If its PE-polyethelene-which is the most common plastic--there are very few adhesives that will bond it.
3M super 77 will join thin layers. TAP Polyweld Adhesive will join large pieces and provide higher strength, however the substrate needs to be heated, and smoothed flat before application. NOT a welcome thought when welding on a gas tank.

Edited by Toolpartzman, December 19, 2012 - 07:37 AM.


#8 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2012 - 06:41 PM

As a bit of a followup, I was able to get my new driveshaft installed last Saturday. The new driveshaft looks very solid, with replaceable yokes and a replaceable center carrier. Here is a pic of the Ford driveshaft.

Ford Driveshaft.jpg

As these things so often do, investigation of one problem led to the discovery of another problem, in this case the discovery that both sides of my rear axle were leaking. Must be why my emergency brakes haven't been holding.

So I gathered all the material I thought I would need, new shoes, rotors, pads, gasket sealant, threadlock, oil, oil additive, bearings, oil seals, and the kitchen sink. You know how these things go, though. I was congratulating myself on how easily the diff cover had come off, went to remove the bolt holding in the spider gear shaft (which also provides keeping the axles in place) and found the bolt had broken, SOoooooo I had to dig the rest of the bolt/pin combo out of the differential carrier before I could remove that vital part.

Broken pin.jpg

It is, of course, only available through Ford, and my local dealer didn't carry it. But they promised to have it available Thursday at 7:30am, so that wasn't too bad. Next item was to remove the axle shafts themselves, not too difficult a process. The problem there came when I began to clean them and found a very noticeable groove where the old oil seal had been. After many phone calls around the area, it became clear that this too was going to be a dealer item. (Parts houses insisted I must have either a 8.8 ring gear or a 9.75. Ford looked up the VIN and said "10.25. That settled that.)
ford axle.jpg
Ford is VERY proud of those axles. 460 for one side, about 800 for the other side. I said "Gotta be a better way" only what I said can't actually be printed on a family site. Figuring I couldn't be the only unlucky person on the planet, I did some research and found "Repair Bearings". They move the bearings so that a different section of the axle is used, and it looked like the oil seal was incorporated and would seat in a different area. In stock at the local auto parts store? Well, of course not!! But again, promises were made to me that they could be delivered Thursday AM.

Repair bearing.jpg

So all my little odds and ends came in this morning, and I picked them up. First thing I did was pop those bearings in the freezer, then I stole my wife's van and went to fix a customer's heat. After that was finished, I came back, used a propane torch to heat the ends of the axle tube nicely, applied a thin layer of gasket sealant around the bearing seat, and pounded those suckers in. The axles were a very tight fit also, I briefly tried the direct replacement bearings and found there was noticeable movement between the bearing and the axle, so I'm actually glad to have used the repair bearings due to the tight fit. Got everything back together before the rain set in, just need to recheck the lug nuts on both wheels and make sure everything is tight and I should be set to go.
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#9 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2012 - 06:47 PM

Sounds like the driveshaft problem may have saved your life! Had the spider shaft dropped out, you could have been in a world of hurt! Glad you found those repair bearings.....they fit the bill nicely!
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#10 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2012 - 08:18 PM

Sounds like the driveshaft problem may have saved your life! Had the spider shaft dropped out, you could have been in a world of hurt! Glad you found those repair bearings.....they fit the bill nicely!


Daniel, that driveshaft issue caused enough stress all by itself. I was about 25 miles from home when it deformed to the point where it started rubbing the gas tank and causing an unmistakeable noise. I was able to pull into a Firestone within about a mile,so that was good. The less good part was the news about the lack of driveshaft servicability, the lack of availibility of the part, and the fact that both I and the truck were away from home. It was a stressful day all by itself. It took a while for things to get better too, as the family was down to just one working vehicle, and I COULDN'T spend much time fixing it, as I simply had to prepare for my finals and put everything else on hold.

#11 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2012 - 09:59 PM

Rough repair! Sorry you had to have it happen but gald it worked out for you.

My Ford explorer tried to over heat a few weeks ago but the tstat managed to pop open for me, so I went on to work. I stopped at NAPA and picked up a replacement tstat for when it happened again. I figure I would just replace it that coming weekend if it would last that long. Well it lasted about 3 weeks (some other stuff came up) before she stopped working again. I turned around and went home called the boss and told him I would be a few hours late. I let the truck cool off for a few hours and went out to start replaceing the tstat. To make a longer story shorter, I ended up paying a professional to do the job. Changing that thing out aint like the old ones.

I like old stuff that you can do basic repairs to, but I dont think we will ever see that again.
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