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Pk Hoods And The Terminology That Comes With Them


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#1 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 08:32 AM

This next installment of Economy tractors at a glance features the hood and popular terminology. The metal body tractors (which is what we will cover here) had basically 4 different styles. No hood, round hood, short hood and long hood. Here are examples of each in an effort to shed some light.

No hood is pretty self explanitory but here is a picture anyway to illustrate. This happens to be a 1948 chain steer that I used to own. The no hoods were primarily in the 40's with the chain steers and into the early 50's. I do not know exactly when they started offering a hood.

PK pics 001.jpg

Then we nove on to the round hoods starting some time in the 50's up through the mid 60's. This happens to be a 1960 version that I snapped a picture of at a fair. The hoods on these tractors bolted on and would not tilt which is why it has cut outs at the gas tank and such.

1960 PK.jpg

Starting around 1965 was what is now known as the short hood. I started calling it "unstyled" but it never caught on. These hoods hinged at the dash and opened in the fashion of a car hood. I don't know who owns this tractor but this is a 1970.

1970 power king 001.jpg

And finally the last version of the metal bodied tractor is what's called the long hood (or styled which, again, never caught on). These were rolled out in the early 70's (around 73 but it gets cloudy because of using up old stock). This is my 1983 2414. The long hoods hinge at the front of the tractor (grill) and latch back at the dash.

83_PK_001.sized.jpg

So, there you have it for anyone who cares. After these tractors is when the fiberglass tractors were made. These are commonly known as plastic Power Kings or Plastic Kings and what have you. That gets a tad insulting to those who own them at times so be careful with your terminology.

Hope you found this useful.

Edited by David Brown, November 29, 2012 - 09:36 AM.

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#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 09:28 AM

Good info,thanks.
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#3 mowinman2 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 02:05 PM

Good to know. I learn something new on here every day!!! Thanks for posting.

Edited by mowinman2, November 29, 2012 - 02:05 PM.

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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 02:13 PM

Thanks for the info. on the different generations of tractors. They are rare up here but occasionally one comes up for sale.
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#5 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 03:44 PM

Thanks for another great lesson Jeff! I think you covered it pretty well!

Just to add to what Jeff said, there were two different style round hood tractors. One of them wrapped completely around and served as the dash, like the example posted above. But, there was also a hood that was just a hood, and it had a separate dash panel. The separate dash and hood were in use by '62; they might have been used in '61, but I am not sure.

I attached a few more pictures, just to confuse you guys a little bit more...

Attached Thumbnails

  • 19057_1369375518254_1347717916_1037279_7480268_n.jpg
  • Photo11111617.jpg

Edited by Ryan313, November 29, 2012 - 03:45 PM.

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#6 Bob 537 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 03:53 PM

my jim dandy has hinges is that origonal. looks like it is because it has the indent on the side tins for the hood to come down and overlap

#7 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 03:54 PM

my jim dandy has hinges is that origonal. looks like it is because it has the indent on the side tins for the hood to come down and overlap


I would say it is not. But, this company might have for only a few tractors. Can you post some pictures?

#8 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 05:24 PM

my jim dandy has hinges is that origonal. looks like it is because it has the indent on the side tins for the hood to come down and overlap


It's hard to say really. Here's the thing about these tractors and this company. The more you know, the less you find that you know. You could have two tractors come off the line, one right after another, both, say, 1614's with three point and hydraulics, equipped exactly the same and they are both different in more than one way. It's just the way they rolled. This is why I figured we would start simple and cover only the basics and go from there. Ryan got a little more in depth with his post which is fine. I only meant to cover the obvious differences for now. This whole company is a tangled web of wierd so buckle in, it's going to be a wild ride.

#9 wilberj OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2012 - 09:19 PM

Great info now I know!

#10 Bob 537 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 01, 2012 - 07:25 AM

I would say it is not. But, this company might have for only a few tractors. Can you post some pictures?



my fault. my hood was cut and hinged. my dad must have done it back when he restored it to get at the engine better or maybe because he couldnt get it off with the plow frame on it he made
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