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Rim Guard In The Front Tires?


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#1 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 08:13 PM

Gents,

A pair of 18x8.5-8 Vredestein 6-ply V61 tires just showed up on my front porch :D :D :D

They are going to be going on my Bolens HDT1000. I'm planning on the HDT being my 'plow tractor' as it has the 22Hp diesel in it and a 3-pt hitch.

Since I plan on using it mostly for ground engaging equipment, I figure that a bit more weight at the front wouldn't hurt.

If I do fill them, I will be using Rim Guard as that would give me the best weight/gal. One question is, does anyone know how much fluid an 18x8.5-8 tire will hold?

Also, have any of you guys fluid loaded their front tires, and if so what were your results?

#2 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 08:24 PM

...how much fluid an 18x8.5-8 tire will hold?...


It is simple, figure out the volume of the tire with this formula below.


Posted Image


Then figure out the volume of the wheel, making sure you are take into account the drop center of the wheel. You might also want to figure out the amount of space above the valve that you probably wont be able to get fluid into. Then subtract that, and the wheel volume from the tire volume. Simple!

Or, you could wait for another member to come and tell you. Then there is choice C... guess.

Disclaimer - the math above may not be correct. Actually, I am almost certain it is wrong. I may not be held liable for any inconveniences.

#3 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 08:41 PM

My best guess would be approximately 30 pounds per tire. I have not done this before this is just my best guess. The added weight 2 the front of your tractor will definitely help to assist the tractor with steering. Whether you will have issues with the front being light on that tractor should not be an issue. I have had an 1855 Massey carry the front Just a small amount in very heavy ground.
Weight is always your best friend when doing ground engagement work.



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#4 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 09:13 PM

I'll be replacing the rear tires as well. It currently has 26x12-12 Ags, but they are really weather checked and probably overdue for replacement.

I'm planning on using 26x11-12 CST ANCLA tires. I'm going with the 1" narrower mostly because of cost, but the narrower tire should 'dig in' better than the wider ones. I know that the 26x12-12 Ancla tires will take 10 gal of Rim Guard which added 110 lbs/tire. If the 11" tires take 9 gal/tire that would be @ 99lbs/tire. If necessary, I also have a set of Bolens wheel weights I can put on as well for another 100 lbs.

I figure that it should hook up really well, and that weight on the front will be needed.

Here is a pic of the CST Ancla tires I have on my 1886. As you can see, they are quite aggressive.

100_4105.JPG

#5 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 09:16 PM

It is simple, figure out the volume of the tire with this formula below.


Posted Image


Then figure out the volume of the wheel, making sure you are take into account the drop center of the wheel. You might also want to figure out the amount of space above the valve that you probably wont be able to get fluid into. Then subtract that, and the wheel volume from the tire volume. Simple!

Or, you could wait for another member to come and tell you. Then there is choice C... guess.

Disclaimer - the math above may not be correct. Actually, I am almost certain it is wrong. I may not be held liable for any inconveniences.

I did your equation. but.... I keep getting different results? Why do I get the numbers 1614, 1618 and 2414? :bigrofl:
  • Ryan313 said thank you

#6 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 09:47 PM

It is simple, figure out the volume of the tire with this formula below.


Posted Image


Then figure out the volume of the wheel, making sure you are take into account the drop center of the wheel. You might also want to figure out the amount of space above the valve that you probably wont be able to get fluid into. Then subtract that, and the wheel volume from the tire volume. Simple!

Or, you could wait for another member to come and tell you. Then there is choice C... guess.

Disclaimer - the math above may not be correct. Actually, I am almost certain it is wrong. I may not be held liable for any inconveniences.

How about: Total Volume = Overall volume-center volume.
For an 18x8.5x8 tire, that would be (3.14*81*8.5)-(3.14*16*8.5) or 1734.85 cubic inches. Using 231 cubic inches per gallon, that's 7.5 gallons of water. Probably not achievable but I'd think you could get 75 to 80 percent. So useable capacity would be 5.5 gallons more or less.
My math could be off, mounting constraints may cause your results to vary etc, etc.

#7 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 10:08 PM

When filling tires you always want some air space so that they will adsorb bumps. Filled to 100% results in a ride like steel tires. I've seen 75% as being pretty much optimum.

Just 5 gal/tire would be in the neighborhood of 55 lbs/tire which wouldn't be bad at all.

#8 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 10:22 PM

This might help.

http://www.rimguard....e-for-ag-tires/
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#9 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted November 26, 2012 - 10:52 PM

You know, I went to the Rim Guard site before I posted here, and didn't think to look at the LIGHT CONSTRUCTION section :wallbanging: :wallbanging:

OK, they say 3 gal for 32 lb/tire. Not as much as I would have liked, but better than nothing.

#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 27, 2012 - 01:54 PM

That has been on my mind for my Ford 1500, since I started using the King Kutter 3 point dirt scoop. Filling it heaping makes the front pretty light even with the 3 -33lb weights on the front on my hill. When I get over ambitious I've been backing up the hill. But maybe I should dial that back a bit? I looked up the specs on that scoop and it's capacity is 9 cu ft which works out the loaded weight to 1080lbs and with the weight of the scoop is at rated lift capacity for my tractor.

Edited by JD DANNELS, November 27, 2012 - 02:35 PM.


#11 wawcub47 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 27, 2012 - 08:14 PM

old buzzard, if your set of 26x12x12 end up on my front porch, i would take very good care of them! seriously!! i need a set but can't afford a new set. price? thank you

#12 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted November 27, 2012 - 09:19 PM

I'll be getting 26-11-12s for the HDT1000 from here:

http://www.discountu...IRES-UTV-TIRES/

At $72.00 each they are actually cheaper than the V61s I just got from Miller Tire.

http://www.millertir...hd-5-rib-6-ply/

Miller does have a 4-ply in that size for $65.00 but I opted for the heavier tire since I may be putting a Sweepster broom on the HDT in the future.




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