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Root Ripper


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#1 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted November 20, 2012 - 06:34 PM

I'm just sitting here, sipping some spiced pumpkin wine, and contemplating my winter project: clearing more land. I've cut down the bushes & sent them through the wood chipper. Now I'm left with 3000 square feet of 1" stumps and their roots to clear. Anyone out there ever build a root ripper or root plow that they are happy with? I've seen a few different types on-line (googled "root ripper") but I'm not sure which way to go. I'd like to hook it to my 12 hp HB 112.

#2 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted November 20, 2012 - 06:53 PM

I dont mean to thread jack, but I was speed scrolling and the thread about the target scam was just above this one about the root ripper. Well I read it as "toot ripper" and had to check it out...not what I pictured.

While I am here.. what about a scarficer (Sp? spell check was no help) from a box blade. They are fairly cheap from Agri-supply, $15 range. A simple bracket would make them work on a sleeve hitch and the 12hp should be able to pull it with ag tires or chains.

Edited by rat88, November 20, 2012 - 06:59 PM.

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#3 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted November 20, 2012 - 08:03 PM

Have a look at these. Princess Auto sells some of their stuff. it looks like it would work if you have enough power to pull them out.
http://www.brushgrubber.com/
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#4 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 20, 2012 - 08:25 PM

I'd be careful about damaging the tractor. My soil is very rocky so the garden tractors are only used after the soil has been dug up screened and replaced. If you don't have many rocks you might just experiment with a regular small land plow. Good Luck
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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted November 21, 2012 - 05:48 AM

With only 12 hp, I'd stay with a single or maybe a double shank to rip the roots out of the ground. Much more than that and you may have traction problems. Are most of the roots shallow, or do they run deep?
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#6 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted November 21, 2012 - 06:53 AM

I made this a few years ago it might work for your roots and then you can use it later gardening , Al
http://gardentractor...183-sub-soiler/
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#7 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted November 21, 2012 - 07:48 AM

Personally, with 1-2 inch roots, I'd look at using the rotary plow on my Gravely tractor. It will break most of that, and what it didn't break, it would beat out of the ground. Otherwise, you are looking at some variation on a sub-soiler. I'd stay with single tine. I don't know what tires you have, but I have been very impressed with some used ATV tires I got. I filled them with water, put some weights on each tire, and left the tire pressure low. On my Massey, the recommended tire pressure is 5-7 lbs, the ATV tire flattens out nicely at that pressure for lots of ground contact.
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#8 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted November 21, 2012 - 09:08 PM

Well, after considering the suggestions provided and wandering around my local scrapyard for an hour, here is my plan: I am going to build a single "knife blade" that will fit on the frame of my Brinley plow in place of the plow & standard. I picked up a piece of 2" x 1/4" angle iron & ran it though my table saw so I have two pieces, each 2" x 1/4" with a 45* angle on one side. Tomorrow, if I get time, I with dismantle the plow & drill the mounting holes. The standard is 1/2" thick, so I will need to beef up the blade. Maybe I'll use one pieces to create a pinch point.

plow.jpg plow modified.jpg
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#9 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2012 - 06:32 PM

Well, I found the time to build the root plow today. I didn't include the pinch point. It would not have helped. Version one included the colter wheel, which limited my depth. To get enough depth, I had to remove the colter & cut the bottom on a 45* angle.

Using the root plow on the HB112 was not "ergonomic". The controls for forward/back and up/down are in front of you & the plow is behind you. Getting enough down force on the root plow lifts the wheels off the ground.

Final judgment: This is a place where "can" and "should" do not intersect.

1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg 5.jpg 6.jpg 7.jpg

#10 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2012 - 07:57 PM

I would sharpen the front edge and weld a "toe" on the bottom. Most rippers I have seen have the toe on it to help pull it into the ground. Just like the plow share is setup to suck itself down. ALC post shows it well.
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#11 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2012 - 07:09 AM

Here is a pic of how my box blade teeth looked when I got it. I added the teeth to help loosen the dirt more.
Image001.jpg
BoxBladeTooth.jpg
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#12 New.Canadian.DB.Owner ONLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2012 - 09:27 AM

I would sharpen the front edge and weld a "toe" on the bottom. Most rippers I have seen have the toe on it to help pull it into the ground. Just like the plow share is setup to suck itself down. ALC post shows it well.



The leading edge is cut on a 45* angle as a result of splitting the angle iron in to two pieces. Depth isn't problem (now), it is the control positions, or maybe I'm using it for the wrong purpose. I've been using it to cut the roots so I can remove the "stumps". Maybe I should remove them first & then use the root ripper to get rid of what is left ...

#13 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2012 - 09:41 AM

I think I misunderstood your post. I thought you couldnt get it to sink into the ground and stay there.

#14 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted November 24, 2012 - 08:42 AM

I've been using it to cut the roots so I can remove the "stumps". Maybe I should remove them first & then use the root ripper to get rid of what is left ...


That's what a lot of guys do. The stumps can be hard to pull though, especially in species that have deep roots and/or tough tap roots. Tap roots go straight down, so you won't get them with your root ripper either though.

I've been through the brush clearing thing a couple of times, and I'd suggest the brush grubber JD Brian mentioned (they work really well) either on a tractor or a come-along chained to a truck, and your root ripper. Switch back forth as needed. Also a sharp 4 foot crowbar, a cutting axe, and a case of dark beer (since it's winter) will help a lot.

What actually works best is hiring somebody with a largish bull dozer to just rip everything up, but then you don't get any seat time and have to deal with the mess.

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Posted November 24, 2012 - 11:17 AM

Well, not specifically GARDEN TRACTOR, but here is a root ripper I made for my excavator. I put it on the boom to replace the bucket. The "teeth" also help cut the roots. And the long bar with the chisel foot can be used to lever roots loose. I made it out of scrap 1" thick steel I had laying around...

IMG00142-20111114-1355.jpg

Youy may be able to adapt something like it for a GT...
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