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1947 Ridemaster -2


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#46 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2013 - 10:21 AM

What are the differences (besides the name) between the Bean Culter and the Ridemaster?

Here is a Bean Cutler.

It has a flat vertical plate behind the engine and the gas tank is mounted right on the engine.

The throttle control lever is cast iron and it sits up on the center of the steering pulley.

The engine is raised and lowered with a big lever that is mounted vertically on the left side of the tractor.

 

7-1.jpg

 

 

This is a Ridemaster.

That flat plate behind the engine has now been formed into a curved "fender" that wraps around the front of the tires.

The gas tank is now mounted in that fender.

The throttle control lever is stamped steel and is mounted on a plate bracket on top of the steering pulley so it is closer to the steering wheel.

The engine is raised up and down by a small lever that is mounted under the steering wheel.

The tractor tube frame is about 6-inch longer than the Bean Cutler frame was.

 

9951ljm_20.jpg

 

 

The tool bar for implements is the same for both tractors and is operated by the same style of lift lever.

The lift linkage on the Ridemaster is designed so the tool bar can be locked in a position or allowed to float but the Bean Cutler does not have this "float" option.

 

The rear wheel hubs are cast iron on the Bean Cutler.

The Ridemaster rear hubs are made from a piece of round steel plate with a steel tube welded to it to form the hub.


Edited by jdcrawler, January 20, 2013 - 10:37 AM.

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#47 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2013 - 04:55 PM

The only other engine control on these tractors is a cable to lower and raise the engine for forward and reverse.
The cable is attached to the lever under the steering wheel.
The plate below this lever is split in the center and the front edge is raised up to form a stop that the lever rest against.
This holds the lift lever in the neutral position.

554.jpg


The cable runs in-between two rollers on top of the steering pulley.

555.jpg


Then it runs over a pulley that is mounted in front of the gas tank  and down to the engine.

556.jpg


The end of the cable attaches to a lift bracket that is bolted to the engine mounting plate.

557.jpg


The two rollers that the cable goes in-between on top of the steering pulley keep the cable in the center.
When the front wheel is turned the cable rides against one of the pulleys and the pulley rotates so the cable can move freely up or down while the front wheel is turned.

Turning right ....

558.jpg

Turning left ....

559.jpg


These have a round gas tank that is exposed on all the sides so I made up a painting stand with a rod bolted to a piece of metal.
This is clamped to a table and the the rod goes in the fuel outlet hole to support the tank.
Now I can paint all the way around the tank.

560.jpg


Edited by jdcrawler, January 21, 2013 - 04:57 PM.

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#48 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2013 - 06:04 PM

Thanks for the explanation of the differences Ray. Nifty idea for the paint stand. Looks like you will have it all done before long.
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#49 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 23, 2013 - 07:17 AM

Ray, I enjoy your builds as you go the extra mile to explain how things work on your machines. I am learning a lot about these as I watch you care and maintain these. Sorry I missed this update when you first posted it. Thanks!


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#50 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted January 23, 2013 - 11:06 AM

Once again Ray, Excellent work. :thumbs:  I really enjoy reading your resto threads. I always learn lots when I do. :worshippy1:

 

Can you rotate the engine around enough to go backwards without using the reverse drive?


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#51 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted January 23, 2013 - 02:47 PM

Can you rotate the engine around enough to go backwards without using the reverse drive?

No, it will rotate a little past where it is in the the photos then the engine hits the frame brackets for tool bar


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#52 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted January 23, 2013 - 02:50 PM

No, it will rotate a little past where it is in the the photos then the engine hits the frame brackets for tool bar

 

I wondered if it would hit or not. Thanks Ray


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#53 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2013 - 01:45 PM

The tool bar is mounted on the tractor.
It is raised and lowered by a hand lever that is mounted on the right side of the tractor.
With this lever pulled all the way back, the bottom of the tool bar is about 20 inch off the ground.

561.jpg


With the lever moved all the way forward, the bottom of the tool bar is about 10 inch off the ground.

562.jpg


There is an arm on the back side of the lift lever that connects with the lower tool arm bracket for raising and lowering the tool bar.
The lower tool bar bracket has a large spring attached to it to counterbalance the implements and make it easy to move the tool bar up and down with just one hand.
There is a 1/4 round "ratchet"  plate that the lift arm rides next to and a pin sets into the notches in this plate to control the height of the tool bar.

563.jpg


This shows the linkage that moves the pin that sets in the the ratchet plate.

564.jpg


This is the upper part of the linkage rod.
The handle on the linkage rod is pulled toward the lift lever handle to raise the pin out of the notch in the ratchet plate so the lift lever can be moved.
The return spring pushes the linkage rod back to lower the pin back into the notch to lock the lift lever in position.

565.jpg


This is the crossover linkage to operate the pin.
The linkage rod pulls on the end of the crossover linkage and that moves the pin up and down on the other end.

566.jpg


This linkage rod can also me moved to a position so the tool bar will float.
The handle on the linkage rod is pulled back to clear the guide bracket and then rotated up to hold it in position.

567.jpg


This pulls the crossover linkage back and the linkage rod rotates up around to the center of the curved part of the crossover linkage.
This movement lifts the pin out of the notch in the ratchet plate and holds it in this position so the lift arm can move up and down freely on its own.

568.jpg


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#54 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2013 - 01:58 PM

Boy, those engineers really had there stuff together on this GT. Very impressive Ray.

 

Thanks for the detailed description. :thumbs:


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#55 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2013 - 02:26 PM

Ray, thank you for the wonderful work, pictures and explanation!! What are your plans for this machine after the restore?


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#56 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2013 - 03:07 PM

Boy, those engineers really had there stuff together on this GT. Very impressive Ray.

 

Thanks for the detailed description. :thumbs:

The engineering ( and the unique design ) on these tractors is one of the main things that made me interested in them.

 

Before these were produced, "garden tractors" were mainly the walk behind style and you could get a sulky so you could ride behind the tractor.

These Ridemasters are basically that same design of a walk behind garden tractor with a sulky permanently attached.

This design is very simple and yet very effective.

 

They have excellent traction with the weight right on the drive wheels.

With the drive wheels in the front, they pull you along instead of trying to push the tractor.

This design also allows the front tires to rotate around so the tractor will turn right around on itself.

One rear tire rolls forward as the other rear tire rolls backward and the driver spins around on the spot.

With the implements mounted on the toolbar the driver can look down and see just what work is being done.

There is no transmission to shift, no clutch pad, no electric starter or battery system,  no fuel pump and no hydraulics.

 

These tractors that I restore are retired just like me and are only used to take to tractor shows.


Edited by jdcrawler, January 25, 2013 - 03:09 PM.

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#57 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2013 - 03:20 PM

Pretty cool stuff, Ray! Thanks for the explanations.


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#58 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2013 - 04:56 PM

They have excellent traction with the weight right on the drive wheels.

With the drive wheels in the front, they pull you along instead of trying to push the tractor.

This design also allows the front tires to rotate around so the tractor will turn right around on itself.

One rear tire rolls forward as the other rear tire rolls backward and the driver spins around on the spot.

With the implements mounted on the toolbar the driver can look down and see just what work is being done.

There is no transmission to shift, no clutch pad, no electric starter or battery system,  no fuel pump and no hydraulics.

 

All great points... So next question is how does the drive system work? Something like the Struck dozers? Just one speed?


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#59 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted January 26, 2013 - 07:50 AM

All great points... So next question is how does the drive system work? Something like the Struck dozers? Just one speed?

This is one speed forward and reverse.

The tractor is driven by three V-belts.

You move the drive lever forward to let the engine drop down and tighten the belts to go forward.

To go in reverse, you pull the drive lever back and it raises the engine up until the outside ends of the engine pulley rub against the tapered sides of the upper drive pulley.

Here is a photo of the drive system.

 

569.jpg


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#60 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 26, 2013 - 08:04 AM

Looks to be quite the job to change belts, or is that rather simple too?


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