Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Taking Care Of You And Yours


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  

Tennblue59

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 6000
  • 450 Thanks
  • 522 posts
  • Location: North east Tenessee

Posted November 14, 2012 - 11:40 AM

Let me pre-load this by saying that I am not trying to be political or offend anyone, but gonna climb on my soap box for a minute here....

Reading the "Zombie" thread (before it turned into a thread about smoking food... :D ) got me thinking. Seems like we as a Country depend on "somebody else" to take care of us too much. Many of the sheeple don't know how to take care of themselves if they have to!

I lived in Florida for many years and was well aware of the hurricane disaster threat - had moderate damage a few years. We ALWAYS kept supplies, food, fuel, medicines, etc just in case, and had bug-out plans if we needed them. But I had neighbors who never did any preping for storms, even when they were just off our shore!

Now that we live in the boonies, the preparedness plans went way up - lots more things to be ready for and protect against. But same thing - I have neighbors who would die parolized on the couch if basic services were interupted.

I'm not one of those "bury guns and gold for the riots" guys, but I am alarmed at some of the things that are happening and wonder whats down the road.... And am trying to be ready for as much as I can.

I started collecting and reading the "Foxfire" book series a while back, but now starting to wonder if those books may be a lot more practical down the road...

Ok soapbox off...
  • tinbender7, boyscout862, twostep and 1 other said thanks

#2 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,756 Thanks
  • 7,525 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted November 14, 2012 - 12:18 PM

I like your "sheeple" word/description. Their attitude is "Ignorance is blissful so don't bother me!" They will become the zombies that all people, that have something, will have to deal with.

A reasonable amount of planning ahead is necessary if you want to survive lifes uncertainties. I read the Foxfire series starting in 1974. That led me to The Mother Earth News(MEN) magazine which I subscribed to for twenty years. I designed and built my house incorporating techniques from MEN. The passive solar heat works well. Figure out what can go wrong and then what you need to do to get through it.

BTW gold is not a great investment because it isn't useful itself. Food, Fuel, Land, Tools, and materials are useful and tradeable if necessary. I invested in land, a solar heated house, an extensive workshop, books and tractors. I hope to build engines to run on soy oil, wood smoke, methane, and steam. Good Luck
  • twostep said thank you

#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted November 14, 2012 - 12:29 PM

That is a good series of books! And yes we can still learn a lot about self suficent living from the ways things were done in the past.
To me self sufficency has been a lifestyle not preparation for a major catastrophy. Our large garden is one of those areas and preservation of the production. It in the past has gotten us through some tough times, more than once.

That said depression,parania and stress is a bigger threat to ones well being and health than any catastropy that could be out of our control. I am not happy with the way I see things going, but I have seen it happen before and will get through this as well.
Remaining positive and clear thinking along with being prepared for anything that comes is the key to happiness and a long life. Stay mellow and it will all work out.
And I apologize for hijacking that thread, I only meant to point out that there was a valuable resource in what apeared to be trash.

Edited by JD DANNELS, November 14, 2012 - 12:36 PM.

  • boyscout862 and twostep have said thanks

#4 Team_Green OFFLINE  

Team_Green
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10410
  • 2,211 Thanks
  • 2,305 posts
  • Location: East of Edmonton...

Posted November 15, 2012 - 10:40 AM

One hand gun, one rifle and one shot gun per person.. LOADS of ammo.. ohh wait thats just normal life.. What worries me if shtf is if everything does collapse there are folks out there that are not ready for no cable tv for a week. These folks are the ones that will try to take anything you have that they think they need. As for any of the "prepping" I have always had extras for a big reason. You can watch for sales if your not in need of it. keep your extras in the rotation and it wont go bad.. A loaf of bread went up to 4.10 here.. so baking bread also heats the house.
  • boyscout862 and twostep have said thanks

#5 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,756 Thanks
  • 7,525 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted November 15, 2012 - 12:39 PM

One hand gun, one rifle and one shot gun per person.. LOADS of ammo.. ohh wait thats just normal life.. What worries me if shtf is if everything does collapse there are folks out there that are not ready for no cable tv for a week. These folks are the ones that will try to take anything you have that they think they need. As for any of the "prepping" I have always had extras for a big reason. You can watch for sales if your not in need of it. keep your extras in the rotation and it wont go bad.. A loaf of bread went up to 4.10 here.. so baking bread also heats the house.


I agree with you except that I would add to your list .22 caliber pistols and rifles. A .22 will work on anything up to a coyote. One old timer down the road used a .22 single shot rifle to take several deer each year when he was a teenager( As told to me by his older brother). That was during the thirtys and really helped the family eat better. Also .22 ammo is cheaper than others.
  • twostep said thank you

#6 Team_Green OFFLINE  

Team_Green
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10410
  • 2,211 Thanks
  • 2,305 posts
  • Location: East of Edmonton...

Posted November 15, 2012 - 01:41 PM

Yes you are right.. I just figured everybody had a half dozen .22's I know i have a couple different ones..

#7 JDGuy445 OFFLINE  

JDGuy445
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10419
  • 356 Thanks
  • 428 posts
  • Location: Holtwood, PA

Posted November 15, 2012 - 02:28 PM

My uncle had a 50 caliber handgun when I was about 5 and he most likely still got it. I got shotguns, rifles, bows, fishing rods, gun powder and anything I could need.

#8 daytime dave OFFLINE  

daytime dave

    Live long and prosper

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 531
  • 4,485 Thanks
  • 6,353 posts
  • Location: Upstate NY

Posted November 15, 2012 - 04:16 PM

I agree, it seems like less and less people can fend for themselves. Those who can are lucky and have been given skills that are valuable. I like the Boy Scout motto "Be prepared"

I've tried to live life like that whenever possible. You can't be prepared for everything, but being generally ready is an important factor. In the Northeast, I make sure I have kerosene for the heaters if something should knock out the power. I stock up on staples of food in general, like sales on non perishables. I have trade able items if things got really bad.

I worry about what all the sheeple and government assistance people would do in a crisis? I can pretty well take care of myself and those close to me, but what about starving, homeless hordes of people? Self reliance should be taught more in school.
  • boyscout862 said thank you

#9 LilysDad ONLINE  

LilysDad

    Cat Lover

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10443
  • 9,600 Thanks
  • 7,656 posts
  • Location: N. Illinois, DeKalb County

Posted November 15, 2012 - 06:38 PM

I worry about what all the sheeple and government assistance people would do in a crisis?


What do you folks have against population control? We as a civilization have been caring for the unsound for a long time. And when you breed an unsound to a misfit, what do you get? No, no! Not a Democrat!!! Seriously, many people aren't capable of primitive living on the spur of the moment. And most aren't able to take from others, at least without whining. The first couple of months after the Big One is going to weed out a LOT of folks!
And when the rifle shells and bottle water run out, a LOT more.

I was thinking today about you folks prepping for hard times. You know who is really going to suffer are the women and kids. Men(some of them) still have to work for a living. How many women are going to want to go back to scrubbing the kitchen floor on their hands and knees? Or bashing the laundry on a flat rock? Or pulling a plow? While their 8 months pregnant?

Edited by LilysDad, November 15, 2012 - 06:42 PM.


#10 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  

Tennblue59

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 6000
  • 450 Thanks
  • 522 posts
  • Location: North east Tenessee

Posted November 15, 2012 - 07:04 PM

Part of what got me started on this was the "Sandy" saga in NY/NJ. And, well the election (not so much political, but the entitlement attitude that seems to be common).

the Sandy coverage made me remember when we went through that sort of thing, and how it was not as bad since we were prepared - and that some of my neighbors who DIDNT prepare had it pretty rough. But I can't ever see myself living in a mass of that many people in a big city. It would be difficult to stay in the city under those conditions..... I feel for those people, but some of the folks interviewed seemed to just be waiting for someone to come save them and restore everything to how it was before the storm! I'm hoping that was just skewed coverage instead of the norm...

Out here in the country, we can grow our own food, I have plenty of spares and fuel. And with a complete shop (lathe and mill) I can make a lot of stuff if needed And with good neighbors (who take care of each other) and low people density, "zombies" arent as much of a threat!

But more important, I (and it seems most of you...) have a desire to take care of ourselves and not wait for "the government" to come save us. I too grew up in scouts (back when scouts was as safe place and a good organization) and learned to be prepared and self sustaining. I taught myself (through trial and error and through apprentiseship) how to do a lot of things. That was common for our generation and those before it. I just don't see that now as much with MOST people...
  • boyscout862 said thank you

#11 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted November 15, 2012 - 08:19 PM

I feel for those people, but some of the folks interviewed seemed to just be waiting for someone to come save them and restore everything to how it was before the storm! I'm hoping that was just skewed coverage instead of the norm...

I think all you need to do is look at what happened in New Oreleans to figure out what will happen in New York.

#12 twostep OFFLINE  

twostep

    Rockstar

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10198
  • 1,850 Thanks
  • 2,476 posts
  • Location: Berea, KY

Posted November 15, 2012 - 11:00 PM

Tenn, I agree with you. I grew up out in the country and after I graduate from college and got married we tried the city living thing but after we had a couple of little ones I just couldn't live with myself if I let them grow up in the city. We are not in a completely rural area nothing like what I grew up in but we at least have enough room to fend for our selves and if all hell breaks loose we can be back on the farm I grew up on in a couple of hours.

Lilysdad, good call on the "when the shells run out" thing... Reminds me, I need to add a bow to the Zombie kit.

#13 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  

Tennblue59

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 6000
  • 450 Thanks
  • 522 posts
  • Location: North east Tenessee

Posted November 15, 2012 - 11:52 PM

We use archery (compound bows) and black powder guns (both rifle and shotgun) as well as more conventional firearms. The price of ammo has shot up over the past couple years, so we morphed our shooting sports into less expensive and easier to sustain versions.

My son got interested in bows several years ago (in Boy Scouts), so he got me back into it.

We didn't do it for the "doomsday scenario", but if it ever happens, I guess they will come in handy.... :D
  • twostep said thank you

#14 ol' stonebreaker OFFLINE  

ol' stonebreaker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 12515
  • 1,304 Thanks
  • 973 posts
  • Location: idaho

Posted November 16, 2012 - 12:23 AM

We live in a small town and have laid in supplies for when the excrement hits the emerson.Unfortunately all my guns got lost in the boating accident last summer. I'm afraid the larger cities and their suburbs will be a very dangerous place if things go bad.
Mike

#15 Team_Green OFFLINE  

Team_Green
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10410
  • 2,211 Thanks
  • 2,305 posts
  • Location: East of Edmonton...

Posted November 16, 2012 - 12:27 AM

We use archery (compound bows) and black powder guns (both rifle and shotgun) as well as more conventional firearms. The price of ammo has shot up over the past couple years, so we morphed our shooting sports into less expensive and easier to sustain versions.

My son got interested in bows several years ago (in Boy Scouts), so he got me back into it.

We didn't do it for the "doomsday scenario", but if it ever happens, I guess they will come in handy.... :D

Pick up a dozen spare shafts, packs of feathers and a clamp to assemble.. spare broad heads.. cheap insurance..
  • twostep said thank you




Top