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The new toy shop.


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#16 mastifflawyer OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2010 - 05:37 AM

George- I am going to go out on a limb and bestow upon you the first Shop of the Month award. We have the Tractor of the Month award, and now the Shop of the Month award. I know you would be too shy and unassuming to award it to yourself, so I did it for you.....

#17 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2010 - 05:49 AM

George- I am going to go out on a limb and bestow upon you the first Shop of the Month award. We have the Tractor of the Month award, and now the Shop of the Month award. I know you would be too shy and unassuming to award it to yourself, so I did it for you.....


You guys crack me up. I still have a lot to do with putting more stuff away and organizing everything. I also need to build a nice big work bench which I think I am going to post another thread on that to get suggestions. I am sure there are a lot of nicer garages to be seen. Maybe we need a thread for it so we all get to check out everyone's garage?

#18 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2010 - 07:47 AM

Nice look shop george. I will try to get you some workbench plans I have.

#19 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2010 - 07:51 AM

Nice look shop george. I will try to get you some workbench plans I have.


That would be great Chuck. I know I want it to be at least 4' x 8'. I was going to use 3/4" particle board with 6" x 6" legs but particle board swells as soon as it gets wet. I would love to get a nice big heavy welding table but between having to move it and the cost of one I have to rule it out. I could always put a sheet of 1/4" plate steel on top of the particle board. I would love to keep the underneath open also so I can store my welder and other items under it.

#20 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2010 - 04:54 PM

That's a great shop. I made a workbench at Dad's by using a counter top that was made to the wrong measurements for my kitchen. The company didn't even want it back to try to sell. It might be worth checking around your area kitchen suppliers.

#21 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2010 - 07:39 PM

That would be great Chuck. I know I want it to be at least 4' x 8'. I was going to use 3/4" particle board with 6" x 6" legs but particle board swells as soon as it gets wet. I would love to get a nice big heavy welding table but between having to move it and the cost of one I have to rule it out. I could always put a sheet of 1/4" plate steel on top of the particle board. I would love to keep the underneath open also so I can store my welder and other items under it.


A suggestion for your work bench make it out of 3/4" exterior grade plywood then cover it with 1/4" masonite or hard board, much more water proof, smooth hard top surface that can be replaced.

#22 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2010 - 08:11 PM

Reject kitchen counter tops makes a good workbench along a wall. Good easy to clean surface, and usually can pick them up cheap. The kind with built in backboard keep things from getting in the crack next to wall, plus most have a raised lip on outer edge to keep little things from rolling off as much.

#23 fordmustang1984 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2010 - 05:33 PM

Boy do i wish my garage had that kind of space. Nice shop George!

#24 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2010 - 06:58 PM

Very nice garage George!! It looks like you will have lots of room for projects in the future. It looks way to clean, I could come down and help you mess it up a bit!

#25 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2010 - 07:53 PM

Very nice garage George!! It looks like you will have lots of room for projects in the future. It looks way to clean, I could come down and help you mess it up a bit!


You are always welcome. You know what is bad is I want to still clean it some more and get more organized which I will soon enough but then once the projects start going it will be a mess LOL

#26 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 20, 2010 - 05:07 AM

As much as a nice neat garage looks great,a messy one probably show that you do stuff in there,and isn't that what a garage is for.

#27 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted August 22, 2010 - 08:29 AM

It is with great sadness that I find myself having to go against the grain of thought on the issue of workbenches.Posted Image


Back in the sixties, I worked for my late father who ran a business that performed maintenance work for Shell/White Rose, BP/Supertest, Texaco/Regent, BA/Gulf/Mobil and some others. Amongst many other tasks we performed, building workbenches to their specifications was a regular occurrence. Every bench used in their service stations had a steel top made from 1/8" sheet that was bent to wrap around the 2 inch thick, solid wood bench top at the front and then bent again to provide a back splash area at the rear of the bench. The steel used was common, mild sheet and we just wiped with oil to prevent rusting.

The lumber spec'd for the bench tops below the steel top was solid, two inch thick, tongue and groove red oak and we pre-drilled it so we could screw it down with #14 wood screws to the bench structure below. That structure consisted of 4 x 4 legs with 2 x 4 cross pieces that were "let in" to the tops of the legs to provide direct bearing on the legs themselves. The bench top sat 36" from the floor because it was felt that this height was the least fatiguing for most mechanics. The benches extended 30 inches from the rear wall of the work bays and were 8 feet in length. Sometimes we fastened them to the rear wall but most of the time it was not necessary.

A bench of this weight provided a sturdy anchoring point for an 8 inch bench vise... an essential tool in any mechanic's shop. Currently, we are bombarded with messages telling us that "size does matter" and I do have some thoughts on that issue. :D

George would like to build a 4 x 8 bench. I would agree that under certain circumstances this would be a good size. That circumstance would be IF...the bench was free-standing in the middle of the work area so that both sides of the bench were easily accessible. If the intent is to place one long side against a shop wall, then IMO, George will come to regret his decision. Instead, he would be further ahead by making one bench that is 16 feet long by 24" deep or two 8 footers that are 2 feet deep. In my experience, benches that are deeper than 24" end up as havens for junk. Rarely do we ever find the need for more than 2 feet of real estate to work on something. Anything beyond the first 24" isn't accessible to the human reach when actually performing work.

If we need to get at something back there, our first reaction is to rotate the item being worked on to bring that part of the item close to us so we can see better and exert greater leverage on the tools being used. The smaller the bench top, the more inclined we are to keep it clean and clear of clutter at all times. Things that should be put away, then get put away so that the bench can be used for what it was designed for. If you want close-at-hand storage, then put up a single shelf on the wall at the rear of the bench as high up as you can comfortably reach but keep the shelf narrow so nothing can be behind something else.

You also need really good lighting directly above your bench so that your body does not cast shadows on the areas you are working on. Fluorescent light fixtures are what I consider to be the best choice. They are inexpensive to operate and they deliver a high amount of lumens for the watts consumed. The eight foot models with the reflector hoods made of polished aluminum are available for a reasonable cost.

Arborite/formica kitchen tops are ok for very light work but they blister from being to close to oxy/acet use and they can chip from heavy items being rolled around on them. And if you do not support them well, the particle board under the laminate surface can fail. I would never purchase one of those bench kits that you see at retail stores. Those are o k for some guy who never does much more than service work on his OPE but anyone into rebuilding/repairing/restoring garden tractors will be unhappy with one of those in short order.

If a bench is not bolted solidly to the wall or is not made heavy, then it limits what you can do with that big vise you bought. A vise is only as good as the item it is anchored to. If you are into fabrication, then you need a vise that will allow you to heat and bend structural steel such as flat bar, square bar and round rod. Trying to heat these items and bend them accurately is tough enough without having a bench sliding across the floor while you are pulling on the item being bent.

Building a work bench is something that needs a fair bit of thought in advance if the bench is going to perform for you the way you want it to. Where you put it in the room is important. Where you mount the vice is equally important. You want lots of room on either side of the vise and you want the jaws of the vise to overhang the leading edge of the bench so you can clamp items into the jaw vertically as well as horizontally. We all learn by our mistakes and it is very easy to make mistakes in bench design. Good benches are far more than a bunch of old 2 x 4's and a box of 4" spikes.
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#28 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted August 22, 2010 - 08:49 AM

As much as a nice neat garage looks great,a messy one probably show that you do stuff in there,and isn't that what a garage is for.


To each his own but for me.. a messy work area is a dangerous and disorganized one. I prefer to have a place for every tool I own and I like being able to quickly locate chemicals and hardware. A good shop is one that shows a lot of planning went into it. A shop is no different than a kitchen and good kitchen layout does not happen by chance. When working on things, time is important. Owning several right-angle grinders for instance, allows you to go from a wire cup brush to a grinding wheel, to a cut-off wheel to a sanding disc instantly instead of constantly switching out these items on a single tool.

Messy work is sometimes unavoidable but having a pail of absorbent product to soak up spilled fluids is a must. Making sure you have a pail of clean rags available is also important as is having a solid metal container with a tight fitting lid to toss those dirty rags into should spontaneous combustion occur. You should have some old 5 gallon buckets with the lids still on them so that used oil and used anti-freeze and used volatile chemicals can be stored separately for proper disposal later on. Safety in the shop is JOB ONE. Fire extinguishers are essential. Having full face shields hanging next to bench grinders and wire wheels help you work safely. Developing work routines whereby you immediately remove the face shield and hang it back where it came from means that you won't have to wonder where you left it.

I can understand a bit of mess while work is in progress but my late father taught me that the job is not over until all the tools are cleaned, sharpened, repaired and put away so they are ready for their next use. The same applies to the benches and the shop floor.

#29 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 22, 2010 - 09:14 AM

Oh I agree that you shouldn't have a messy garage,AND I don't like messy cluttered garages either.I was talking about only a slight mess,I mean when I am doing a body job on a car for instance,I am constantly sweeping the floor because I can't work with all of the pieces that have been cut off,or the sanding dust (body fill ) that collects on the floor.So despite what I may have said in a previous post ,I do not think a garage should be messy in order work right.

#30 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted August 22, 2010 - 12:14 PM

Well, if I had the time to clean every time I was finished with something, then I would. But life & it's jobs don't always allow time for everything & when I get a piece of equipment repaired, it's "hi-tail it back to the field". In my personal little shop, it's the same...get it done while you have a few minutes. I agree, in a perfect world, the shop stays clean, but my world is far from perfect. My shop is usually a disaster, but my tractor projects seem to come through just fine despite it. I can paint with crap everywhere & dirt on the floor & never have an issue from it...all a matter of watching what you're doing. I really wish I had time to keep my shop tip-top, but I don't, so I don't worry myself about it. I clean it when I get the time. Safety IS a big concern, and should never be skimped on, no matter how short of time. As to organized, I can always find what I want when I want...unless Dad or my Son borrow stuff and don't tell me, which happens too often. Battery chargers seem to be the hardest thing to locate. I have 3 of different sizes, but they have legs. Not posting this to argue any points, as all said are valid, but people's lives are different, so the way we have to operate is different also.




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