Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

All You Wood Workers Out There....


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 Team_Green OFFLINE  

Team_Green
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10410
  • 2,211 Thanks
  • 2,305 posts
  • Location: East of Edmonton...

Posted November 14, 2012 - 01:28 AM

Im needing to pick up a small drum sander.. any of you guys know of one that a guy should look at and any a guy should run away from?? Or should i be looking at a thickness planer and use my hand sander after..

#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted November 14, 2012 - 06:27 AM

If you need to remove much material at all I would go with the planer. A good one with sharp blades will leave a surface that can easily be sanded out by hand with a random orbit sander.

#3 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

Bolens 1000

    DR. Bolens

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7
  • 12,701 Thanks
  • 17,209 posts
  • Location: Western NY

Posted November 14, 2012 - 06:41 AM

If you need to remove much material at all I would go with the planer. A good one with sharp blades will leave a surface that can easily be sanded out by hand with a random orbit sander.


:ditto:

I would recommend the Planer as it is fast and leaves a smooth clean surface if the blades are properly maintained.

#4 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

Chuck_050382

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 32
  • 267 Thanks
  • 1,498 posts
  • Location: Mt. Vernon, IL

Posted November 14, 2012 - 09:01 AM

I agree with the other two, I haven't used a drum sander, but my dewalt planner does a good job. On a side note, once you get a planner you will want a dust collector, because the planner will fill a shop vac after a few boards.

#5 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

marlboro180
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10710
  • 634 Thanks
  • 954 posts
  • Location: SE WI

Posted November 14, 2012 - 09:54 AM

TG, you said "small, "but that needs a little more defenition IMHO. Benchtop , or cabinet mounted? Are we talking about doing lineal stock, or what?

Powermatic, Grizzy, Jet , etc. all make a w i d e array of drum sanders. :thumbs:

#6 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

robert_p43
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 11040
  • 572 Thanks
  • 534 posts
  • Location: Virginia

Posted November 14, 2012 - 11:19 AM

I think everyone is talking about thickness planers, not those little hand held ones. My experience:
Hand planer- for taking down edges of boards, such as a high floor joist. Have used on door edges also.
Thickness planer- for taking board down to thickness such as 1 inch lumber to 3/4 inch
Belt sander- for smoothing of boards before using a palm sander or random orbital sanger. Also have used on door edges.
Palm or Random orbital sander- finish sanding of flat wood before finishing
Those sanders that have a big disk and also a belt. Handy for small woodworking projects, jewelry boxes, wooden toys, etc.
Drum sander? Not sure, I have seen huge ones that will thickness a whole door in seconds. I have a tiny one that just goes into my electric drill that has come in handy for curved radiuses.
Hand sanding blocks and fine sandpaper- final finishing on anything.

#7 JakeKuhn ONLINE  

JakeKuhn

    Wheel Horse Addict

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • GTt Junior
  • Member No: 9298
  • 183 Thanks
  • 268 posts
  • Location: South Haven,Mi

Posted November 14, 2012 - 12:29 PM

A drum sander is a really nice took to have. But you can't just use one as a planer. Your going to need a planer as well. jet and performax make the better drum sanders. And a dewalt is a good planer. My brother has a powermatic in his woodshop, but they are not too affordable. ~Jake

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted November 14, 2012 - 01:12 PM

Those are all good posts and good advice. The only thing I can add is if you have burly wood where the grain runs in every direction the drum sander may be a better choice because a planer could catch the grain and cause chipout. The drum sander really comes into it's own if your building a lot of cabinets and can set up and run all the doors through on a production line set up. Though I have seen guitar builders use the drumsander a lot too, for thin top woods.

Edited by JD DANNELS, November 14, 2012 - 01:16 PM.

  • Chuck_050382 and marlboro180 have said thanks

#9 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

Chuck_050382

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 32
  • 267 Thanks
  • 1,498 posts
  • Location: Mt. Vernon, IL

Posted November 14, 2012 - 02:14 PM

JD Dannels has a good point about thin material and gnarly grain. The sanders can handle way thinner material than a planner.

#10 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

marlboro180
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10710
  • 634 Thanks
  • 954 posts
  • Location: SE WI

Posted November 14, 2012 - 11:32 PM

We still need defintion of " Small " by TG, lets see what he is thinking about, other than sleep! LOL'

#11 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

IamSherwood

    Elf guardian

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2066
  • 8,379 Thanks
  • 7,696 posts
  • Location: Northern Ontario

Posted November 15, 2012 - 08:10 AM

Every machine has it's pros/cons. What you need, depends on the project, materials to be milled, future uses, budget, etc.
Lots of variables.
What are you planning on doing?

I have a 24" dual drum sander, and it's great. I also have a 12" planer. It's great to work with too, but each one has
it's limitations.

#12 Team_Green OFFLINE  

Team_Green
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10410
  • 2,211 Thanks
  • 2,305 posts
  • Location: East of Edmonton...

Posted November 15, 2012 - 10:54 AM

Okay... sorry i was so short on info.. my mind is on my kid in the NICU.. Im going to be building gates and such.. Wood needs to be cleaned up but not all the same thickness. just loose most or all of the splinters.. 1x4 and biggest being 2x6 mostly 1x4 and 1.5x5..

I do have a large shop dust collection system. budget.. well.. as cheap as possible..I know i know ya get what ya pay for.. BUT i'm hoping with this i could step up to a better one in a year.. Just need to get the ball rolling.. Maybe a planner and hand sanding is the way to go as it's much cheaper route..

#13 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted November 15, 2012 - 11:20 AM

In that Case with 1X and better I would go with a planer for sure. If you were making jewelry boxes a sander might be a better choice.

Edited by JD DANNELS, November 15, 2012 - 11:21 AM.


#14 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

marlboro180
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10710
  • 634 Thanks
  • 954 posts
  • Location: SE WI

Posted November 16, 2012 - 03:12 PM

Agreed ^ .

I have a benchtop 12" Dewalt unit, and it has decent capacity and feed rates. If the knives are ground and honed well, it sure makes a fine planer. Very minimal snipe, if at all. When I do get a little snipe, it is usually because I forgot the lock the head down, or am taking off too much material in one pass.

#15 lyall ONLINE  

lyall

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2180
  • 1,747 Thanks
  • 1,398 posts
  • Location: State Center, Iowa

Posted December 16, 2012 - 08:49 PM

I like using a scraping planes and free hand scraping
my grandfather taught me how years ago how to use them
saves a lot money on sand paper
they are easy to use and take care of

I use the free hand scraper to remove paint runs, then I can use the sanding paper to get the paint ready to paint over again
  • marlboro180 said thank you




Top