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Kohler K Series Head Gasket Replacement-basic Tutorial


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#1 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2012 - 07:45 PM

I found THIS while shopping for a new head gasket, I thought it was a good little write up myself!
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#2 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted November 10, 2012 - 06:36 AM

sure is pretty cool. For the guys that don't know how to do this, that's a good write up. Thanks for shareing

#3 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted November 10, 2012 - 06:53 AM

One thing I would add is to make sure all the head bolts will freely thread into the block far enough to seat the new gasket. A bolt that hangs up on something and gets hard to turn before the gasket is seated will cause a false torque reading. If the engine has been well used and run hot sometimes you can have trouble getting the old bolts out, which can damage the threads. I had to run a tap through the holes on the K321 on my JD314 to deal with this. I also used new grade 8 bolts. The Kohler K series engine service manual also gives some good info. on replacing the gasket.

#4 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted November 10, 2012 - 07:39 AM

Forty something years ago I was taught to always run a tap in all threaded holes in an engine block after the machining was done. Then do the final cleanning and light oilling. The bolts would be inspected and suspect ones were replaced. The place where some of the older guys differed in opinion was on whether bolts should be oiled and what weight oil. The link above didn't work for me, I hope it said to check head flatness.

#5 HankS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 03, 2012 - 07:44 PM

The link doesn't work for me either.

'Most' engine torque specs are based on a new or clean bolt. They also assume a clean bolt hole or nut and oil libricant. Standard motor oil, weight doesn't really matter. Don't use a moly lube unless a torque spec is given for use with moly lube, It lubes much better than oil and you can end up with too much pressure being applied. Torque specs can vary quite a lot if oil isn't used so always assume oil is used as a lubricant. As mentioned run a tap or 'thread chaser' into the block to clean out any rust or dirt and blow it out with a compressor if possible. Also use a tap or thread chasser on the bolt. Torque the bolts in increments and in the proper sequence. If the spec is 30 ft/lb, then torque in sequence from 15 or 20 ft/lb, then in sequence at an additional 5 ft/lb until the final torque spec is reached. Run the engine until it's fully warmed up. That means under load, not just at idle. After the engine has cooled re-torque to the required spec in the correct sequence again and you should be good to go. Most gaskets will compress so checking them after a heat up/cool down cycle is a good idea.

If the bolts are 30-40 years old, like found on many of these tractors, just replace them. If the torque settings have changed again after a second heat up/cool down you need to replace the bolts, they're shot. Grade 8 bolts are $3.99 or $4.99 a pound, can't remember which, at Tractor Supply. They do stretch and once they've stretched, well just toss them and replace with new. Once they've stretched the thread spacing has changed and the torque specs are meaning less.

#6 mike912e OFFLINE  

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Posted December 12, 2012 - 02:43 PM

Lots of good information here . I was able to access the off-site web address and it had great info and pictures . I needed a reason to buy the Kohler brand gasket kit versus an aftermarket set and this forum answered my question . Sure, it costs twice as much but in the long run it is worth it to me . Thank you .

#7 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 12, 2012 - 03:12 PM

I bought THIS one. I ordered it on Saturday and it already arrived! I just saw the package sitting on the table. I got the last one. :D




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