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Rolling Sheet Door


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#1 js5020 ONLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 02:52 PM

Anyone using one of these over a traditional garage door? How do you like it and how is it holding up?

#2 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 03:18 PM

They are cheaper to build but can be a PITA on windy days. They are hard to open/ close.If the wind hits them just right, the banging will drive you nuts. I had to wedge a 2x4 between the brace and the door. I have seen barn doors get blown partialy open and ripped out of the tracks. Double doors are even worse. They need to be supported at the bottom to keep from swinging and the lip is a good place to get tripped or twist an ankle, not to mention hard to push in a dead tractor. Snow and ice piling up around the doors and blowing in the cracks is another bad issue

I went with overhead doors on my new shop and I am glad I did.

Edited by rat88, November 08, 2012 - 03:20 PM.


#3 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 04:02 PM

No not a slider, those can be a pita,, a roll up type door that is made from a sheet of corrigated steel and rolls up in a drum usually mounted above the door,,,, usually seen in commercial applications.

#4 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 04:14 PM

I gotcha now. We used them at work. they are a little noisy going up and down. the manually operated door take a little longer to open.

#5 johndeereelfman ONLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 04:41 PM

This is a product that we sell and install at work. We sell doors made by Cornell Iron Works, Wayne Dalton and Cookson. These doors are very reliable and durable. Most doors are rated for 20 mph winds, and as mentioned about the sliding door, if you have a real strong wind, these doors will give a little, bind in the tracks, and be hard to open. Depending on the size you are planning to use, motor operated is the best, as manual hand chain operation can really get tiresome after a while. There are springs in the barrel assembly, and get wound so that it is easier for the motor to pull the door open, and or easier to pull open with a hand chain operator.

The doors are available in both a standard service door, and as a insulated door. You can also get them as a fire rated door, which means they will close during a smoke detector activation or a power outage. You can get them in galvanized primed finish, aluminum with clear anodized or bronze anodized finish, powder coated color finish, and in stainless steel. I like the fact that the whole unit is contained above the opening in an enclosed area of about a 15" x 15" headbox. Yes, they are a little noisy when the wind blows against them, and after a period of time, they will start to rattle a little bit during operation, but if you keep them well lubed and serviced, they won't give you any problems for many years.
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#6 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 05:17 PM

This is a product that we sell and install at work. We sell doors made by Cornell Iron Works, Wayne Dalton and Cookson. These doors are very reliable and durable. Most doors are rated for 20 mph winds, and as mentioned about the sliding door, if you have a real strong wind, these doors will give a little, bind in the tracks, and be hard to open. Depending on the size you are planning to use, motor operated is the best, as manual hand chain operation can really get tiresome after a while. There are springs in the barrel assembly, and get wound so that it is easier for the motor to pull the door open, and or easier to pull open with a hand chain operator.

The doors are available in both a standard service door, and as a insulated door. You can also get them as a fire rated door, which means they will close during a smoke detector activation or a power outage. You can get them in galvanized primed finish, aluminum with clear anodized or bronze anodized finish, powder coated color finish, and in stainless steel. I like the fact that the whole unit is contained above the opening in an enclosed area of about a 15" x 15" headbox. Yes, they are a little noisy when the wind blows against them, and after a period of time, they will start to rattle a little bit during operation, but if you keep them well lubed and serviced, they won't give you any problems for many years.


I knew there had to be someone out there that had a working experience with these. The door is not big at all, 8x7 , I like the style as I have a 7' opening with a 10' ceiling and really dont want rails hanging down 2'. We have these doors at the job, some exterior and some fire, but I would say all of em are heavy duty commercial not residental duty, and didnt want to buy before seeing if there are quality issues that need to be looked into.

#7 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 06:20 PM

I have one at work as a "Fire Door". It was activated once and we just about couldn't get the darn thing back open....It wasn't installed properly!

#8 johndeereelfman ONLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2012 - 07:36 PM

For a 8' x 7' size, I'd go with the hand chain operation. Seven foot high won't be really bad for opening this size door. They also have a crank operator available, if that would interest you. If it were me, I'd go with the crank operator. As for the door, I'm assuming this door is for closing off an exterior opening? If so, I recommend a galvanized steel door with a gray primed finish, and exterior guide weatherstripping. If you want an insulated door, then I'd recommend an aluminum insulated door with clear anodized finish, 120v/1ph - 1/3 hp motor operator with a reversing edge that spands the width of the door opening, and upon impact, will cause the door to stop and reverse the travel.

I price these doors all of the time, and if it will help you, I can give you a couple of estimates, just so you know about how much they run as far as cost. Then if you decide to go with this type of application, you'll have a comparison price to see how your local door company stands in pricing. Just send me a PM if you're interested, and I'll help you out.
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#9 Guest_Franz©_*

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Posted January 02, 2013 - 10:30 PM


I knew there had to be someone out there that had a working experience with these. The door is not big at all, 8x7 , I like the style as I have a 7' opening with a 10' ceiling and really dont want rails hanging down 2'. We have these doors at the job, some exterior and some fire, but I would say all of em are heavy duty commercial not residental duty, and didnt want to buy before seeing if there are quality issues that need to be looked into.

 

Why not just add a couple feet to the bottom of the track and move the stored door up to the roofline?  It requires a bit of tweeking the spring to compensate for where the door goes from being vertical to stored, but that can be accomplished.  There's a whole website dedicated to overhead doors and parts for them.

 

Shoot, I thought this was a thread about making your own from corrugated roofing.  I still gotta work that one out.






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