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Put The Garden To Bed For The Winter Today


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#1 Oo-v-oO OFFLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2012 - 06:56 PM

We put the garden to bed for the winter today. Added some shredded leaves to the weak end of the garden then tilled them in before planting a bunch of garlic.

I started off with the little freebie walk-behind tiller I fixed up this Spring, but yesterday I had a few moments and reinstalled the carburetor and fabricated a missing piece of throttle linkage for the engine on the 3-point hitch mounted tiller for the Suburban. It actually ran pretty good, but I still had to replace the fuel line and bolt down the fuel tank. Rather than using the walk-behind for the rest of our garden and my neighbor's, I went back home and finished up the tiller, removed the front and middle blades from the tractor, and brought it up to try it out.

Worked surprisingly well, and other than having to strong-arm the manual lift, MUCH easier than using the other tiller. I need to make or find a handle extension for use with the tiller - holy crap, it is a HEAVY toad hanging off the back of the tractor. I will need a front counterweight, too, because I could lift the front of the tractor up easily by hand and I had to back up the steepest hills because the front wheels wouldn't stay on the ground.

The Hydro-Trac worked awesome for tilling. I've never used a gear-drive Suburban, but I really doubt one would go as slow as I was while I was tilling.

Pictures!

After tilling our garden:

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Janette mulching the garlic we planted:

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I also tilled in Ed's garden while I was up there:

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He had deer tracks in his garden. I think they were after the broccoli plant he left behind. It also looked like there might have been moose tracks coming up his driveway.

Very impressed with the tiller. I still plan on replacing the engine with an 8hp Briggs & Stratton, like it had originally. The Wisconsin-Robin that is on it now is only rated for 3.5 hp continuous, 5 hp max. Still, it impressed me with how well it did. Only had to let it catch up when I was tilling the edges, where the grass was encroaching. I guess I must have guessed pretty close when I fabricated the replacement throttle linkage out of an old coat hanger.

Man, I really love these old Sears tractors and all of the different attachments that were available for use with them. It's a shame they don't make anything like them any more.
  • tinbender7 said thank you

#2 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2012 - 07:50 PM

What an excellent set up you have!! Love the tiller I have been looking for that style for my Sears tractors for a while...near impossible round here. Those gardens look great. Looks like fresh topsoil laid right down.....You deff have a great working tiller there......Thanks for the pics...great job, oh yea...Janette has that look most wives get when we take their pic....knowing they'll be on this site within hrs... :bigrofl:

#3 Oo-v-oO OFFLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2012 - 07:58 PM

Thanks! Sure was a lot easier than the front-tine tiller. Whereabouts do you live? I see them come up for sale from time to time, but not too often.
You can also easily convert one of the Sears walk-behind tillers by just removing the handles and installing the 3-point hitch plate which can be fabricated without too much difficulty.

I think I got, "You're not taking a picture of me, are you?" :D

#4 Bmerf ONLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2012 - 08:06 PM

That tiller does a nice job. Beautiful scenery in the background.

#5 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2012 - 12:45 PM

Looks Great!
A buddy of mine has a tiller like that and it had a 8 hp Tecumseh. He said it was to heavy and when I looked at it to check it out, I asked why he had to lift it. It looks like it is made to set on the wheels all the time. The front lifts so the tiller isn't setting on the ground and when lowered, it lower the tines for tilling. Am I wrong with this assumption?
By the way, looks like you live in N.H? Did you ever see the "Old Man" before he fell? I was glad my kids got to see him. I grew up in N.H. but my younger kids grew up in Florida and saw him on a Vacation we took. I live in Va now.

#6 Oo-v-oO OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2012 - 06:03 PM

They make different versions of the self-powered tillers. This is the style that is made to be used with a 3-point hitch and the rear wheels are there to help limit how deep it will dig, not for transport. A variation of this type uses a sleeve hitch but is otherwise the same.

There is also a version I have seen that is newer which is made to be used with a lawn tractor that does not have a hitch. With those, the rear wheels stay down and the front lifts up for transport.

You can see in my last picture that I have the wheels lifted up (in the 2nd hole from the top) and they are over a foot off the ground with the hitch lifted. Here is a picture of an Agri-Fab tiller from Northern Tool which is made to be used on just the fixed drawbar of a lawn tractor or a GT without a 3-point or sleeve hitch. Notice the lifting arm built into the front of the tiller:

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Yep, I'm a NH native. Got to see the Old Man many times before he came down. Left to nature, he would have come down many, many years sooner but for the efforts of Park employees who helped to shore him up over the years.

Edited by Oo-v-oO, November 05, 2012 - 06:03 PM.


#7 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2012 - 07:07 PM

I remember, as a child, my father telling us that he would have fallen long ago if not for the chains helping to keep him there. I'm 60 now.
For those interested, it was a historic landmark in Franconia Notch State Park in New Hampshire. This landmark fell a few years ago.
http://www.mutha.com/oldmanmt.html




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