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Cow Manure......


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#1 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 04:12 AM

Ok, found a guy selling manure on CL...yup, you heard me right....lol. Anyway..he will sell it by the truck load (you bring your own truck, trailer, etc...) or he has various size dump trucks, or by the bag. all pretty cheap I think the bags were $3 for 25lb, and $5 for 50lb bag. truck loads were up to like $65 for 1000lbs. Anyway, I wanted to pick some up for use in my garden. He said one pile he has is 3years old and the other is 10+years old. He mixes it all with sawdust and keeps it turned over with a backhoe and tarped to keep temp above 115 which apparently kills off any weeds that may grow. I guess I'm lookin for opinions here....anyone use it? effects? ........I've used manure on our farm growin up but I never stored it that long nor mixed with sawdust....he even claims soaking a burlap bag of it in water and usein the water as liquid fertilizer....(tea baggin method)......Help me out guys.....olcowhand???

#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 04:22 AM

The only thing I can think of to say is that CL is an odd place to see cow manure for sale.

#3 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 04:22 AM

I would use it, I used to get mine from the stock yards. You can't wrong with poop!!!
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#4 RoosterLew OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 04:40 AM

Wow! That's some old ………stuff!

#5 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 05:18 AM

The ten year old stuff will be more dirt than manure, but should be very nutrient-rich. The three year old stuff should be pretty well-rotted too but likely a little higher in nutrients. The older stuff will be less likely to have have pathogens in it, so if the price is the same, I'd go for the ten year old stuff if it's for a veggie garden, the three year old for grains or non-edibles. That's actually a pretty minor thing though...I certainly wouldn't turn down the three year old stuff.

As for the heat-treating he's doing...it will help. Don't think your manure will be weed free though. The only way to guarantee weed-free manure is to never let the cow out of the barn and feed it nothing but dry, crushed grain. Even then you'd have to keep the manure indoors in a plant-free environment until it was ready to sell. So be prepared for some weeds.

It's worth it though, because manure really helps to build soil.

The price seems kind of high to me, but I've never really adjusted to manure costing anything. It used to be free, now the dirt-yards buy it to mix into topsoil. If you live near a big centre, there's likely a price on it. I've heard of people around here paying up to $100/yard for sheep manure. The price he's asking is likely based on the local market, so it's likely fair.

#6 Newpaws493 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 05:36 AM

Have heard of the tea bag method, some say it's awesome stuff.
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#7 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 06:10 AM

Thanks guys. Im gonna grab some...cant see it goin wrong & i know the effects it can have ina positive way.

#8 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 06:42 AM

Have heard of the tea bag method, some say it's awesome stuff.


I have done this but you to add LOTS of air to it.

#9 poncho62 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 07:13 AM

Farmers around here pracically give the stuff away....The horse farm I got mine from, I would shoot him $20 for loading my trailer full........It has to sit a couple of years or its pretty weedy

#10 tinbender7 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 07:57 AM

here in Fla it is about the only thing that is free.
http://lakeland.crai...3370784920.html

#11 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 08:23 AM

No manure is ever weed free, but after 2 years or more, it's as close as you'll get. Can't go wrong with composted manure for growing great veggies!
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#12 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 08:32 AM

Up here we look at liquid manure being worth about $8/ton for the value of the nutrients (N-P-K) in it. Liquid manure runs about 70 - 80 percent water.

#13 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 08:41 AM

The soil in my garden was just a mess when I bought my home in 2006. It was muddy when wet and hard as a rock when dry. We had a 40 X 45 area plowed and tilled and I bought a cheapo soill test kit and tested it. NOTHING! I mean, this soil was terrible for gardening. I bought a pickup load of composted cow manure and shoveled it off at one end of the garden. This stuff was black and like dirt, completely composted. It sure looked like a tiny pile so I bought a 1 ton dump load of "aged" horse manure from a garden supply / nursery. This stuff had big round horse poops and hay and some sawdust. By the time I went to spread this stuff, the weeds were already growing in both piles. When I tilled it in, it helped some and we had a great garden but the soil didn't blacken up. The next year we added a pickup load of goat manure, and a pickup load of horse manure, this time freebies.
Third year, no garden but I did till it in the springtime. My work kept me to busy that year.
Year 4, the neighbor had a huge pile of really black composted cow manure where they had cleaned up their barnyard. My daughter and her boyfriend took my truck and got so many loads that it covered the garden 2 or 3 inches thick. By now, the garden is getting rich in organic matter. Year 5, a few pickup loads of semi composted sheep manure and hay. One year I added pelletized lime.
This year I didn't have a garden but expect that next year, It will be looking real good.
Craigslist always has some kind of manure available in the springtime in the Shenandoah valley of Virginia, some free, some high dollar. Some you load, some you load.
Great for the gardens. This year, I just got 1 load of the sheep stuff again, used half the load around 6 small fruit trees and the other half went on a new raspberry bed that I am adding next spring.

Edited by robert_p43, October 29, 2012 - 08:43 AM.


#14 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 04:50 PM

thank you everyone for your help.....yal have been great. A friend of mine layers it on top of his garden in the Fall and then puts another layer on in the spring, tills it all over real good and plants....he always has great results. I believe I will try this method.

#15 Rock farmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2012 - 04:53 PM

I live in an old sand pit.
Nothing but sand, clay, subsoil, mold and rocks when in moved in.
(Hence the name "Rock Farmer) weeds would not grow here!
So, I'd take anything I could get to improve the soil. Shoveled a lot horse menure.
That should always be free. Although you could pay something to have it loaded.
Horses have a single stomach, so you gets lots of seeds. On a lawn that's something you
Can manage. I wouldn't put it a a veggie garden unless your soil is real bad (like mine).
Cow manure is best (three stomachs-much less seeds) I usually pay about thirty five bucks for a heavy pickup truck load.
Picked up in my truck, I use an easy loader tarp to unload, saves a lot of work.
I like it to be about a year old. Older than that and I feel a lot of the nutrients may have leached out.
Newer and it just too heavy and wet. Mixing saw dust with is just a filler,wood actually
Robs your soil of nutrients until it composts. I'd go for the three year old stuff.
Sheep and chicken manure are very good stuff too, I just don't have access to
Enough to make it option for me. I do use saw dust around here. Works great for
Walkways and eventually it does break down and rot.

Joe




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