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What Fall Prep Work Do You Do To Your Garden....


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#1 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 07:33 AM

ok, so I enlarged the garden and I tilled the leftovers of everything I had under and the soil is soooo rich. It pretty much has been since the first time I tilled. I have added peat moss to it and other fertilizers....i put a nice layer of leaves over it to breakdown over the winter which seems to help each year.....come spring i will till it again and be ready for planting, possibly adding a layer of peat moss again when tilling. I always like what it does to the soil.........
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before the leaves spread across of course......

#2 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 08:38 AM

My compost bin is at the end of the garden. At the end of the season I spread all the years compost and plow/till it in. My soil isnt the best around here but its getting better.

#3 jd.rasentrac ONLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 08:49 AM

I shredder and compost the leaves, too. If leaves are shreddered, they are easier composted.

#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 09:04 AM

We make sure all the weeds are gathered best we can, then mow the crops. We have an old beater mower just for the purpose and mulch all we can. Then we spread the grass clippings and whatnot from the compost pile and till it in.

I never understood why some people put down regular lime in the fall, had it explained to me the other day. Hydrated lime releases faster, thus you use it in the spring, regular lime takes a long time to break down, apply it in the fall so it's ready for your planting in the spring.

Didn't study the science, just repeating the explanation. To late to try this year, maybe next year I'll get a bag and try it.
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#5 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 10:12 AM

I've heard alot about people useing "lime" but never really tried it because I don't understand it. Better to stick with what I know works has always been my method. Thanks for the info MH81

#6 Robert Webb OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 10:31 AM

Does anyone have soil samples done each year to find out what you actually NEED in your garden soil? You can have it done relatively cheap at the local Co-op extension service or local universities.
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#7 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 10:36 AM

Does anyone have soil samples done each year to find out what you actually NEED in your garden soil? You can have it done relatively cheap at the local Co-op extension service or local universities.

I've never done that either...lol. Never really thought of it. Great idea tho. Thanks for the input. Great ideas here guys, thanks for joining in!! :good_job:

#8 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 10:46 AM

I've heard alot about people useing "lime" but never really tried it because I don't understand it. Better to stick with what I know works has always been my method. Thanks for the info MH81

Well, I did study 'soil science' back in the day LOL! Basically, the acidity of the soil plays a role in how available your basic nutrients, Nitrogen, Phosporus and Potassium, are to your plants. Soil typically becomes more acidic over time, because rain water leaches away the calcium which is a base and balances out the acidity. As your soil becomes more acidic, the nutrients become less available to the plants. Less available nutrients means your plants are starving, no matter how much fertilizer you add. Plus, just by adding fertilizer, you are adding materials that are acidic, not neutral. Although, generally you probably will do no harm by putting down some lime, you really should have your soil tested.
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#9 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 10:48 AM

Well, I did study 'soil science' back in the day LOL! Basically, the acidity of the soil plays a role in how available your basic nutrients, Nitrogen, Phosporus and Potassium, are to your plants. Soil typically becomes more acidic over time, because rain water leaches away the calcium which is a base and balances out the acidity. As your soil becomes more acidic, the nutrients become less available to the plants. Less available nutrients means your plants are starving, no matter how much fertilizer you add. Plus, just by adding fertilizer, you are adding materials that are acidic, not neutral. Although, generally you probably will do no harm by putting down some lime, you really should have your soil tested.

Great info....thanks for shareing!!

#10 Farmlife OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 11:00 AM

since were talking about "lime", look what I just seen on CL. This guy doesn't play around when it comes to spreading....lol
http://buffalo.craig...3363436447.html

#11 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 11:38 AM

I turn my gardens by hand in the Fall, till in the composted material in the Spring!

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Lowell
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#12 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 11:46 AM

We through on 1" to 2" of well rotted horse manure, till it in, then cover them with leaves or rotted hay. We get the manure and hay from local horse ranchers for free. The leaves we get from the ends of people's driveways. We pickup extra to feed the compost pile.
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#13 bja105 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 03:18 PM

I have two gardens, 50 miles apart.

The garden at home, I tilled in some chicken coop litter, then sowed winter wheat. It is a foot tall, now. I have a big compost pile, and lots of bagged leaves I scrounge in the neighborhood. They will be tilled in in spring. I have tractors with plows, now, so I can turn a bit deeper next year.

At the farm, I spread a load of cow and horse stall cleanings. I had mulched the garden this year with waste hay. All got plowed under last month, then spring tooth harrowed. Last week, I sowed winter wheat. It might be too late for it, but maybe not. I have a big pile of sawdust, pine needles, grass clippings, and leaves starting to compost. I hope to add a few deer carcasses and guts, too. Some of that will be spread in spring, but most will need a year. I will plow again in the spring, and might buy a load of sand to help with the clay texture.

I'm excited for next year. I plan to use my new old tractors for cultivating rows, as well as soil preparation.

#14 JDGuy445 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 04:23 PM

18 inches of a moldboard first, next comes the spring-harrow, followed by the spin spreader with cover crop seed and fertilizer and then another round from the spring-harrow to finish it off.

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#15 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted October 28, 2012 - 08:03 PM

I just dump leaves on top of mine...leave them whole because my grandmother told me I should. Apparently leaf mold is good for soil, just bad for grass. Not sure of the science behind it, but Grandma was generally right about these things.

When it comes to acid soil, bone meal generally helps with that by adding calcium. That's something I do in the spring though.

What I would have like to do this fall, but was too busy and cold came too soon, was to add a couple inches of well-rotted manure and work it in to the soil. I don't like adding manure in the spring, it's too wet back there early on, and too close to planting later. I guess that'll leave me paying for some topsoil instead because my soil needs a lot of help.




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