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I Got A Welder, Now What?


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#1 bja105 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:14 PM

I got a Lincoln AC/DC 225/125 welder today. It was used, and is missing the work clamp. I will add a 230v outlet in the garage, maybe tomorrow. I also got gloves and an auto darkening helmet.

I need to go to Tractor Supply tomorrow, and I saw they have clamps and welding rods. Any recommendation for welding rods to start with?

I bought this welder to make hitches and cultivators, so 1/8" to 1/4" steel is what I plan to be joining. I will start learning on a few scraps I have.

Anything else I need to pick up? Is there an internet resource for learning welding that you recommend?

Thanks
Jason

#2 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:24 PM

I like the way 7014 and 7018 rods work in my Lincoln. I use the Hobart brand from TSC, they seem to work as well as anything. just make sure you buy the AC rods.

#3 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:35 PM

6013 Rods are easiest to weld with and make better slag to knock off. Think the diameter is 5/32? or bigger stuff needs 1/8" Just buy some small paks of diff rods and sizes and experiment. AC Rods??? First I've heard of that. I have that old Lincoln "Buzz Box" myself. Start in 75 to 95 amp ranges for smaller rods. I rarely go over 135 amp and that is with thick steel and biggest rods. If they stick a lot and don't start, go up an amp setting. I learned welding in school some and have also asked around for help and ideas over the years. Just DOING it is best teacher. Would think your welding supply shop in area might have some flyers to get started. maybe you can order a manual for your welder, sure that tells how to use it and making good beads. Heck, just go on web for your brand or even on epay and I bet there are manuals for your model.

#4 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:39 PM

A lot of welding supply outlets will have a small "cheat sheet" that will tell you what amp setting to use for a specific size of steel, and rod you are using.
As stated aboue, practice is the best teacher.

#5 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:47 PM

I'v got the same welder and if your only welding light gauge steel get 3/32 dia. rod. You will have less sticking problems. :D

#6 Clippnalawn OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:56 PM

I learned the basics of welding in school, then just practice and plenty of research on the net. I actually have learened a lot from searching you tube.... both the " what to do" and "what NOT to do". There are some very skilled welders on you tube and there are some "welders" that have no business lighting a candle let alone a torch or striking an arc. lol There are also welding forums that are an absolute wealth of knowledge just like this is for tractors.

Edited by Clippnalawn, October 27, 2012 - 10:01 PM.

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#7 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:56 PM

I have 4 Lincoln welders; a buzz box, 2 gas powered, and an SP150 MIG. I use 7018AC filler rods for most work. Thirty years ago, when I started welding at home (we had TIG at work) two of the certified welders I was working with recomended the 7018AC. They called it idiot rod because any idiot can get a nice bead with it. They were right. I've gotten better at welding but still use it for almost all my welding. The exception is if I'm going to machine the weld after. 7018 is too hard, it is also high strength.

Lincoln used to have a good manual. http://www.lincolnel...or-manuals.aspx may still have it.

Edited by boyscout862, October 27, 2012 - 09:59 PM.

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#8 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 09:58 PM

We use 6011 and 6010 for and non critical welds, and use the same rod to root pass all structural welding. Then we do an overlay pass with 7018 or if it's good flat welding 7024 (called Drag Wire). The first 2 numbers of the Series numbers (6011) is it's tensile strength, meaning that all 60XX rod has 60,000 PSI shear strength. 70XX has 70,000 PSI and so forth. I have been required to use 10018 on some projects. There are a couple places on the net just for welding, do a Google search. One of the main things is too travel slowly, a 12" long rod should cover 6" of length of weld. Another thing is angle of rod to work.
I hope this helps some and doesn't confuse you.

#9 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 10:01 PM

Also, most boxes of welding rods have a recommended Amp setting for each Dia. rod written right on the box.

#10 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 10:03 PM

Like said, 7014 and 6013 rods are easy to use. They are known as "fast fill" rods. I would suggest starting out with some 6011 rods. They are "fast freeze" rods and are harder to make a nice bed, but are more versatile.

I will try to explin the rod numbers the best I can.

The first two numbers are your tensile strength, a 6011 rod has a 60,000 pound tensile strength. Some rods have very high tensile strenghts, like the 110XX rods.

The third number is the welding position. Such as flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead. A 1 here symbolizes an all position rod. Even though a 6013 says all position, don't expect to make a nice horizontal weld with one, unless you have a good self to weld on.

The fourth number is the type of flux, chemicals, and what polarity you use with the rod. Of the numbers this is the most confusing. A 6013 rod has a lot of iron powder in it and that is why you can get a good looking bed so easily.

I am sure that there re better and more detiled expplinations about the numbers on the internet, but for now you can better understand what you are buying.

I have a picture that shows different weld passes, and what is wrong with them. It is very helpful and I will post it tomorrow.

#11 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 10:03 PM

Once you've started welding abit. You may find that a heavy steel welding table is very handy. Good Luck

#12 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 10:06 PM

I almost hate to do this as I can see the confused look on Jason's face from the different replies. I've made a good part of my living welding and most done with a stick welder. From this I learned one thing. If I could have only one rod it would be 6011 in 1/8". It will weld through rust, paint, dirt. grease and galvanizing. And runs on a AC or DC power supply. 7018 is a fantastic rod but should be used on clean material and soaks up moisture like a sponge which in turn creates a lot of porosity in the weld.
For what your doing I would start out with 6011 in 3/32 and 1/8 inch. If you learn make nice welds with that you will be able to do well with a lot of other rods.
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#13 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 10:10 PM

I have a Haynes welding guide book and a welder's handbook by Richard Finch from US forge. I'd say, read the handbooks, figure out things like a/c, d/c, reverse d/c, then set your machine up and practice.

#14 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 10:11 PM

I almost hate to do this as I can see the confused look on Jason's face from the different replies. I've made a good part of my living welding and most done with a stick welder. From this I learned one thing. If I could have only one rod it would be 6011 in 1/8". It will weld through rust, paint, dirt. grease and galvanizing. 7018 is a fantastic rod but should be used on clean material and soaks up moisture like a sponge which in turn creates a lot of porosity in the weld.
For what your doing I would start out with 6011 in 3/32 and 1/8 inch. If you learn make nice welds with that you will be able to do well with a lot of other rods.


Chris makes. Gret point with the 7018 rods! They soak up moisture! At my welding class we keep all of the 7018 rods in an oven. This keeps them from going bad. If you have a woodstove, you can just keep the rods close by when you are not using them (a little hrd in summer though).

#15 bja105 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2012 - 10:17 PM

I bought the Finch "Welder's Handbook" and have just started reading. I also found an interesting site, http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/.

Keep the advise coming, I appreciate it all. Thanks

Jason




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