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My Archaeological Sieve


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#1 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2012 - 12:12 PM

I burn a lot of scrap lumber in my fire pit in the summer time. It's a handy way to get rid of it without making a trip to the dump, and the ashes are good to mix in the compost for the flower mix, although I keep them out of food crops because of the glues and pressure treated lumber.

This year's mix of ashes was questionable enough (a lot of old painted stuff and who knows what's in the paint) that I just dumped it with the clay fill so it will get buried and covered with topsoil and then grass.

Anyway, burning scrap lumber creates another problem...nails and screws and old hinges. The kind of things that damage tires. I've been trying to find a good way to separate those from the ashes.

Mrs. Rev also likes to get the lumps and rocks out of the compost and topsoil when she's potting plants.

Finally, I'm always looking for something to do with all of those fence boards I have stacked behind the shed, and like carpentry.

So I was watching a video on the internet and these guys were digging up a Bronze Age village in Britain and shovelling the dirt into a sieve. I realized it was what I wanted.

They showed a close-up of an old knife or something and you could see the wire and part of the frame. I figured out the basic construction from that. I looked up some videos on the internet and discovered the pivot portion is usually just bolts riding on wood. That seemed a little shabby to me, so when I went to buy bolts I picked up a couple of bushings as well.

I built mine a bit bigger because I don't have a power tool for cutting wire mesh, and I'm basically lazy, so I decided the sieve should be the same size as the mesh I had. The increased size made it a little more wobbly than I liked, so I added a cross member. I didn't see any with handles in any of the videos, but the boards I was using were long enough, so I cut those in with a jigsaw.

The basic construction is easy: Cut the boards to build a box the size you want. Cut in the handles. Cut an inch off the bottom of each board. Build the box. Stretch your wire mesh over it. Attach the one inch pieces back to the boards with screws to hold the mesh in place.

Tack the legs on. Drill a hole the for the bushing and whack it into place. Untack the legs and put a bolt (I oiled it first) though the bushing with washers on each end. Double nut the bolt so it isn't too tight.

Use a plane or sandpaper to break the edges on the handles.

I took me a couple of hours, including the trip to Princess Auto, and has given us about three hours of use so far.

Here's some pics:

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#2 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2012 - 01:40 PM

Neat, and you can use it to mine Gold too!

#3 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2012 - 01:57 PM

Nice job Rev. Looks like you turned excess stuff into something usable. What will you do with all the nails.

#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2012 - 04:42 PM

It's nice to have a Princess Auto nearby. That sieve will save you a lot of trouble and time in the future.

#5 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2012 - 05:00 PM

You scared me when you said you were burning press. treated lumber in the fire pit.

#6 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted October 21, 2012 - 07:08 AM

Nice job Rev. Looks like you turned excess stuff into something usable. What will you do with all the nails.


I keep them until I have a load going to the scrap metal place or one of BILs has a load I can throw stuff in.
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#7 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 21, 2012 - 07:48 AM

Cool! Ought to work real good for your purpose.

#8 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 21, 2012 - 10:11 AM

I llike your sieve, however just a little food for thought here Reverend,,,

"In December, Wisconsin’s environmental agency fined John Menard, owner of the 200-store Menard’s home improvement chain, $1.7 million for burning CCA scraps to heat the company’s lumber production facility. Menard was caught carting the ash from that facility to his home, where his disposed of it with the family trash.

In Minnesota, 22 cows were killed when a farmer spread fireplace ashes from CCA-treated wood in the field where they were grazing.

Polaski’s review cites two incidents, reported in 1988 and 1990 newspaper articles, of people harmed by using treated wood for fuel. In both cases, the people developed neurological problems, numbness in the arms and legs, loss of hair, skin rashes and gastrointestinal upsets.

“Burning any of the wood in a fireplace or outside is a bad thought, and presents a clear exposure route to toxic chemicals that should absolutely be avoided,” the EPA’s Rotenberg said."


source : http://www.weatherbo.../ccaarticle.htm

CCA is not real good to burn, and poses some long term ill effects.

#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2012 - 09:19 AM

Ok while I will acknowledge that it may not be good to burn it. Just how are you to dispose of the scraps?
Truckloads go to the landfill every day. Is that better? And if one were to take them to a Hazardous Waste Center, how do they dispose of it?
Since I don't have John Menards money, I wonder how it would be profitable to Prosecute/Persecute me?
Not trying to be a wise guy, just curious as to how it should be handled?

Rev I like your sifter!

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 22, 2012 - 09:22 AM.


#10 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2012 - 11:09 AM

JD,

In regards to disposing of CCA treated wood, most likely your solid waste hauler would like to see it in the landfill. Is that better than burning it ? Well, I am not sure, but that is how it is regarded here.

The EPA thinks landfilling it is better than burning it, as the Arsenic binds to other molecules, and gets passed around our environment , wildlife, and children. Here is their take on it.

http://www.epa.gov/o.../cca/cca_qa.htm

Having been a carpentry contractor for a couple decades, I have used tons ( literally) of that wood, and have never had any ill effects from it, but am always leery of it's properties.

#11 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2012 - 05:09 PM

How do you balance that thing on two legs while filling it??? What? I'm just askin'!

#12 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2012 - 09:05 PM

I have a need to sift rocks and catus, this is what I came up with.


And I do burn small amounts of treated lumber in an out door pit, but the ashes and debres are bagged or boxed and taken to the land fill.
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#13 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2012 - 10:29 PM

T think I want one of those in our bedroom LOL. Though , I think this thread still needs the vid of the upside-down trailer drag...
\
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#14 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2012 - 05:47 AM

Neat sifter you came up with there, Larry! Thanks for the video.

#15 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2012 - 06:12 PM

T think I want one of those in our bedroom LOL. Though , I think this thread still needs the vid of the upside-down trailer drag...
\


Why not :dancingbanana: I'll get flaimed again, oh well. This was before the 38" blade, and I needed a way to clear rock and catus, and break in the newly rebuilt 18 hp briggs. Be kind.... :D





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