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Parke County Covered Bridge Fest


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#1 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 09:51 AM

I spent a few days at the festival. My wife, Lynn and I have been going there for years. I have several photos to share.

The first is the obligatory bridge photo. This is the Bridgeton bridge, located next to the mill in downtown Bridgeton, IndianaSome years ago, a drunk burned it down along with another down the road. The local folks spear-headed a fund raising drive,hired a couple of Amishmen, and with the help of volunteer labor, rebuilt the bridge like original.
103_9778.JPG .

Next is a couple of garden tractors to make this thread legitimate. The first is a little Farmall F20 wannabe made from a Wheel Horse. The other is an unknown??? It'salmost certainly a factory made. I'm amazed at the frame rails made from one I beam. It was bent to curve around the front. Does anyone even recognize the trans?

DSC06644.JPG DSC06645.JPG DSC06646.JPG DSC06647.JPG DSC06648.JPG

The last photo was taken at a flea market. I found these cowboy chaps in great shape for $200. With out coaxing,[ the lady said she would take $125. Since I don't have a horse, I can't use them, but I couldn't resist trying them on. These are the real deal, made from really heavy harness leather. They don't bend! That is why cowboys walk that way.

DSC06643.JPG
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#2 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 09:56 AM

It looks like a nice festival. That's a nice cub in the first picture.

So you said no to the chaps huh. Maybe if she had a ten gallon hat. They look kinda cool.

#3 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 10:10 AM

That's pretty neat LD, thanks for sharing. I looked up some history on the net, and found some more interesting stuff.

Posted Image"In 1809 the Indians sold some of their prized land, which included a part of Parke County, to the U.S. Government. This treaty created the boundary line which came to be known as the Ten O'Clock Line, so called because it was explained to the Indians as following a shadow cast at 10:00 o'clock. The land south of the line was to be opened for settlement; however, it was delayed by a Shawnee chief named Tecumseh and his brother The Prophet who were angered by the treaty. Their hopes for uniting the tribes into one big confederacy were shattered after the Battle of Tippecanoe and the death of Tecumseh in 1813 while fighting with the British in the War of 1812. The first settlers came to Raccoon Township in 1816.
Posted ImageThe village of Bridgeton had its beginnings with the building of a sawmill on the banks of Big Raccoon creek south of the Ten O'Clock Line about 1823. Later a buhrstone was added for grinding corn and then wheat. Flour for making bread wasn't readily available to most people in Raccoon Township in the early years. Corn was the staple in their diet and they used corn meal to make such breads as hoe cake, corn dodger and Indian Pone. Hog and Hominy was a favorite dish and in the words of one old timer, "When rightly prepared it was no mean dish either." The mill was a central point where people gathered to catch up on the news. Whiskey was sold there for 25 cents a gallon. Originally called LOCKWOOD MILLS, the place became known as SODOM because of all the drinking and fighting. It was named BRIDGETON after a post office was established and a crude open bridge built in 1849. The covered bridge was built in 1868 and the present mill, in 1870. Corn meal and flour are still ground today with the old fashioned buhrstone."
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#4 Grumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 11:34 AM

Its been a few years sence we've been there. I like going through the week. It's not so crowded.

#5 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 12:40 PM

Being I grew up just 20 miles north of there, we used to go every year. We haven't been since we moved to TX. Mom and my Step-Dad still go every year to ee if there is anything they can't live without.

Bridgeton is one of 5 or 6 areas within a 10 mile radius all around Rockville IN. that have a part in the Covered Bridge Festival...

#6 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 02:39 PM

That's pretty neat LD, thanks for sharing. I looked up some history on the net, and found some more interesting stuff.

Posted Image"In 1809 the Indians sold some of their prized land, which included a part of Parke County, to the U.S. Government. This treaty created the boundary line which came to be known as the Ten O'Clock Line, so called because it was explained to the Indians as following a shadow cast at 10:00 o'clock. The land south of the line was to be opened for settlement; however, it was delayed by a Shawnee chief named Tecumseh and his brother The Prophet who were angered by the treaty. Their hopes for uniting the tribes into one big confederacy were shattered after the Battle of Tippecanoe and the death of Tecumseh in 1813 while fighting with the British in the War of 1812. The first settlers came to Raccoon Township in 1816.
Posted ImageThe village of Bridgeton had its beginnings with the building of a sawmill on the banks of Big Raccoon creek south of the Ten O'Clock Line about 1823. Later a buhrstone was added for grinding corn and then wheat. Flour for making bread wasn't readily available to most people in Raccoon Township in the early years. Corn was the staple in their diet and they used corn meal to make such breads as hoe cake, corn dodger and Indian Pone. Hog and Hominy was a favorite dish and in the words of one old timer, "When rightly prepared it was no mean dish either." The mill was a central point where people gathered to catch up on the news. Whiskey was sold there for 25 cents a gallon. Originally called LOCKWOOD MILLS, the place became known as SODOM because of all the drinking and fighting. It was named BRIDGETON after a post office was established and a crude open bridge built in 1849. The covered bridge was built in 1868 and the present mill, in 1870. Corn meal and flour are still ground today with the old fashioned buhrstone."

And now we know the rest of the story, Brian. Had to move to Texas, did we? :bigrofl:




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