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Spray Can Paint Versus Spray Gun Paint


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#16 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 07:57 PM

Hmm.... Just got the same thing..... I'll have to look into this.
I tried to copy and paste the pics from a previous thread.


Are you guys members here? Ha ha ha!

I clear coated the ingersoll hood with 3 coats of clear, (color sanded) I have no Idea why they call it color sanding when it is actually clear coat sanding...with 1000, 1500, and 2500 on the DA, then I buffed it out with 3m rubbing compound, meguiars polishing compound and then show car glaze...yep it looks like a mirror...
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#17 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 08:02 PM

Hmm.... Just got the same thing..... I'll have to look into this.
I tried to copy and paste the pics from a previous thread.


Fixed it :D
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#18 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 08:18 PM

I'm not sure, what's going on here, but when I click your links, I'm prompted to Sign in.
And then, nothing happens.



I got the same thing when I tried early, but just figured I was on here so long that the website timed out! LOL

#19 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 09:34 PM

As any car detailer will tell you...the ability of the paint to refract light is directly proportionate to the amount of shine. That said, any surface under close enough magnification will appear 'rough' the saving grace with clear is if you apply enough of it with a good bond to the previous coat you can sand on the clear to bring all of the 'ripples' level, but the paper leaves a scratch in the clear, then the 1500 and 2500 reduce the scratches from the 1000 thus making the scratches in the clear very fine at the same time leveling more. Once the surface has been 'color sanded' to perfection ...meaning you can see no ripples in the clear and the ony thing visible to the naked eye is 2500 scratches, then you can begin to buff. If you are using a rotary buffer you must keep it moving or risk burning through the clear...and that is a bad thing. But, if you've applied the clear heavy enough, and leveled it properly the rubbing compound will begin to shine..and shine, but like the 1000 grit paper the polish will remove the scratches the rubning compound leaves behind, and when you apply the show car glaze the scratches are simply to fine for the naked eye to see. Once you get to this point the light will refract flawlessly and you will have a mirror shine... BTW clean is your friend, I know many detailers swear by using 'water' on the pads. However, I myself have realized the best shine by using new pads with no water...and Practice on something that is meaninngless to you. Unless you can get a porter cable xp7424 wihich is a DA polisher...then you cannot burn through the clear, Problem with that is ...it takes longer to buff the same area...GL

Edited by NutCASE, October 15, 2012 - 09:35 PM.

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#20 Gfann OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 09:43 PM

I personally have never been able to use a spray gun but I've seen the results of both and they both can look real good. It seems to that the advantage to the spray gun is more control especially in the tight spots. In my experience with spray cans, if you go through the process of sanding a priming good, the end product is pretty good, but that true for painting in general. But if I had the space and equipment to use a spray gun I'd use that.
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#21 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 05:49 AM

Nutcase, wouldn't the abrasives in rubbing compound be a little to harsh on a freshly painted surface? I'd think you'd be doing more damage than good. Eliminating the rubbing compound might save you some time in eliminating an extra sanding step. I go straight to the polishing compound, as the abrasives in polishing compound are a lot finer, and don't scratch as easily. Just an opinion, and not saying that I'm right.

#22 83MALIBU OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 06:13 AM

I painted my Cub and John Deere 212 with spray paint. They both turned out great and I am happy with the results. The reason I didn't use an expensive spray paint is my grandchildren. I want them to be able to climb on, drive, and enjoy my ractors as much as I do. My oldest grandson is 8 and he loves to drive them around the yard. I spray can painted them so that I can easily touch them up and don't have to worry as much about scuffs. That being said, when they are older I may strip them back down and do another resto with a two stage automotive paint.
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#23 RoosterLew OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 06:30 AM

Since it is about opinions....
You can get a great finish from spray cans, but it takes WAY too much work! Spray pattern is uncontrollable and the difference is made up sanding and rubbing!! Even a cheapo pot gun will spray better than rattle cans.

Now, with that said.....
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1350386947.728066.jpg
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1350386993.378714.jpg
1966 Wheel Horse looks much better than it "needs" to with only two light coats and a heavy finish coat , all rattle cans!!

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#24 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 07:06 AM

(1)... and I applied three coats of gray primer, sanding between the second and third coats with a standard brown paper bag

(2) Applied another heavy coat of green and allowed to set up for eight hours, and sprayed it all down with light water.


There are at least two new things for me in your fine post.

(1) Really? A brown paper bag? What grit is a brown bag? I have polished wood carvings with brown bags, but it was more of a burnishing process.

(2) What is the purpose of the water here?

Edited by LilysDad, October 16, 2012 - 07:08 AM.

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#25 RoosterLew OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 07:55 AM

The water helps it cure.
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#26 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 07:59 AM

Mitakuya,

1)The brown paper bag takes off a lot of the overspray without removing the primer. It gives a nice smooth finish and don't give scratches or sanding swirls. You'd be suprised at the results.

2)The water helps to cure the paint faster and harder, and I personally think it gives a nicer shine when using spray cans.
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#27 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 08:36 AM

Nutcase, wouldn't the abrasives in rubbing compound be a little to harsh on a freshly painted surface? I'd think you'd be doing more damage than good. Eliminating the rubbing compound might save you some time in eliminating an extra sanding step. I go straight to the polishing compound, as the abrasives in polishing compound are a lot finer, and don't scratch as easily. Just an opinion, and not saying that I'm right.


First when you do a Base Coat Clear coat the clear if coated a couple times sits over the base coat. So imagine for a minute that the clear has been given a day or so to 'sit' and cure..even 2 days or 3 isn't a 'bad idea'. So like I indicate in my previous post the 1000 starts the cut by removing the top ridges in the clear and quickly eliminating the height of the ripples. once the ripples have been removed and the clear is pretty flat then you can go to the 1500, what the 1500 does is to reduce the depth of the 1000 scratches...leaving a finer scratch, Same thing goes for the 2000 or higher. Now could you go from 1000 to 2000 or higher, sure but you're going to spend more 2x more time doing so. Let the paper do the work for you, it is very consistent. I will also stress at this point do NOT reuse old paper, get a couple of sheets of new stuff, and if the paper starts to clog, or slow down, just get a new piece, let the paper do the cut for you. The Rubbing compound I realize the most success with is the 3M liquid compound. And just like the paper the rubbing compound has a cutting element to it, the rubbing compound is equivalent to the first round of paper, but the scratches it leaves behind are much finer than the 2000 paper, then when you go to the polishing compound the scratches it leaves behind are about 1/2 of the rubbing compound, and same thing goes for the show car glaze. Just like the paper, have a nice very clean pad preferably new pad for the glaze, and for the polishing compound.(or swirl remover) even if you don't see 'swirls', after you finish that then the show car glaze.

Last year I did my BMW like this...it took 14 hours to complete the car...but the shine was incredible. Once done it is done and a simple 'clay bar' application will get he paint shinier than a new car. Same thing for a tractor...yep this method will take some time and effort...like anything in life the harder you work, the sweeter the results...

Edited by NutCASE, October 16, 2012 - 08:48 AM.

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#28 RoosterLew OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 09:03 AM

The water helps the curing process, speeds it up and seems to finish better too! That hood, four hours after I sprayed it I put it in my shower for 15 minutes and was able to install it an hour later.

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#29 dave8338 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 12:38 PM

This was done over that last month or two and was a "test" as to what I coul get away with as far as finish, cure times, and first time shooting Valspar JD Green out of a spray can. I was quite pleased at the results. For a worker tractor, I wouldn't need a better finish. I have no doubt that if I wanted to take the time, the process would yeild a show quality finish.

Ace Hardware brand enamal primer out of a spray can...
Posted Image
Really liked the way you could build with this primer. Flattens out sand scratches from the fiberglass and bondo work and as long as there was even a slight tack to it, +- 10 minutes, you could apply the Valspar directly as if it were another coat of primer. 100% compatible !

Posted Image
This was shot start to finish with final two coats of primer and three coats of the Valspar all within a two hour window. Fast and green...was the plan.

Posted Image
Hood finish prior to buffing by hand with swirl mark remover.

Posted Image
After hand buffing and a coat of Synthetic Detailer Spray from Turtle Wax. Really like this product.

Posted Image
One without flash to show reflection.

The Valspar sets up HARD for an enamal and I would expect it to chip before it gouges from branches, ect.

Good enough for its' intended use. :thumbs:
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#30 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 06:40 PM

That finish really turned out nice Dave. Great job!
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