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Spray Can Paint Versus Spray Gun Paint


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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 06:14 PM

Since there seems to be a lot of questions lately about which application is better to use, spray can application or gun sprayed application, I thought we could post some pictures of our finishes, and let them do the talking for us. When posting your picture(s), show a picture of your finish and give a date of when you restored the tractor. Try to post the most recent picture. This way guys can see for themselves just how the finish is holding up. Also tell us if the finish is, as is right out of the can or gun, or if you applied a clear coat and or wax. Please be truthful and honest.

We can sit and argue for weeks about this subject and only confuse those who have the questions. This will be a professional way to show our work, and let our efforts speak for themselves. Since so many people look to us for guidance and advice, then we need to follow through and give them what they need.



This is a 1984 John Deere 212 that I restored for a guy back in August of 2010. Everything was brought to me in pieces, as the grandson took the tractor apart and was going to restore it himself. After he saw how many pieces were involved, he gave up. So the grandfather brought it to me. The tractor was completely stripped of origianl paint, and I applied three coats of gray primer, sanding between the second and third coats with a standard brown paper bag. The primer was nothing fancy, just Restoleum Automotive Primer. After the primer sat for three days, I started applying the finish. Standard John Deere Agriculture Green from the can. Two light coats applied, then one heavy coat. I left the paint cure for four days before wet sanding with 600 grit paper. I then applied another thin coat of green followed by another heavy coat. After allowing the paint to cure again for another four days, I wet sanded again, with 1000 grit paper. Applied another heavy coat of green and allowed to set up for eight hours, and sprayed it all down with light water. Allowed the finish to cure for two weeks, then wet sanded again with 1200 grit paper. Polished each piece with polishing compound, and started the reassembly process. When the tractor was completely back together, I went over it all with three coats of wax.

I just saw the tractor this past August at a local Farm Show, and the tractor looks as good today as the day that I painted it. He doesn't use it much, other than to pull the grandkids around in the yard with a dump cart, and has since bought a John Deere 314 to do all the yard work with now, but he's threatening to drop off the 314 sometime for me to restore and make it look as good as the 212.

Edited by johndeereelfman, October 14, 2012 - 06:18 PM.

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#2 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 06:45 PM

This tractor was painted 100% with spray cans, the hood has 2 coats of clear on top.
Electric Massey 027 (2).jpg Electric Massey 031 (2).jpg

This tractor the Red was painted with Spray Gun and the Grey, Silver and Black with Spray Cans.
66 MF10 103.jpg 66 MF10 104.jpg

Side by side
Electric Massey 036.jpg

IMO the Red from the spray gun came out the nicest, seems to have more depth to it.
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#3 JDGuy445 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 06:50 PM

The 630 was done in, I think 2009. The 2520 done just last fall. Both with a spray gun using John Deere Primer and John Deere Agricultral OEM paint.
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#4 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 08:04 PM

Troy, I think this is a GREAT thread and as waiting to see all the results.

Your spray can paint job on that 212 is fantastic, the depth of the shine is awesome.

I think it all comes down to what you are used to using and how well you do your prep work.
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#5 Salatino OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 08:28 PM

I dont think you could have said it any better, this topic has been going on for a while now, pictures are a great way to let people see for themselves. I'm suprised the toppic of buffing hasnt come up as much as wich way to paint . I'm intristed in how to buff out the paintjob when its done. I'm currious on that, can you buff it out ,if you didnt clear it? After I'm done wet sandin and its cured for a while I usually just put 2-3 coats a wax on.But I dont have clear on anything...That jd sure does look good !!Would you mind sharing how you buff it all out
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#6 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 08:31 PM

This is done, with a couple coats of sandable primer, rubbed down, with
scotchbrite pad. Then 2 light coats of Massey yellow, and the final coat done
heavy. All done with rattle cans.

Thanks for revealing your process Troy. I will try it on the next one

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#7 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 08:37 PM

What did you use for the Yellow?

#8 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 12:06 AM

well...
Here is a hood sprayed with a gun and 3 coats of clear...
Posted Image
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Applying Tack coat...
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Underside done...
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base on ...
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Clear on...
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Here it is all done...my youtube capture...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIvqthGVrOQ&feature=plcp

The only 'add' I have it that the spray gun allows you to control the color, and type of paint. Which is nothing more than a protective finish. So, by following the directions you can do a wonderful job with the can as well as with a gun. 90% of paint work is in preparation...if you take your time with the prep and make every square inch perfect, following the directions of the manufacturer you can get outstanding results with either method. I also want to add I have seen some astonishing results with a roller....Then again I have seen some horrid jobs where a guy brought the tractor in from the field and decided to paint her up...dirt and all. and as you guessed, it looked like hell. To me the essence of painting is the aesthetics concept, there are guys that seek the protection route and could care less how it looks...So, I say my posts are all to the collector or guy who cares how they turn out...to the guy who is gonna brush on some rustoleum, that is a different classification, and they'd probably not pursue a spray job at all...

Edited by NutCASE, October 15, 2012 - 05:14 PM.

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#9 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 06:01 PM

Come on guys, you mean to tell me that we currently have 10,559 members, but only 5 of us have restored tractors? This post isn't for comments, just an opportunity to show off that restored tractor, and a way of telling us how you did it. It's like a website tractor show! Let's see some more tractors with nice finishes, and hear about the techniques or steps you used to get them that way.
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#10 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 06:20 PM

I dont think you could have said it any better, this topic has been going on for a while now, pictures are a great way to let people see for themselves. I'm suprised the toppic of buffing hasnt come up as much as wich way to paint . I'm intristed in how to buff out the paintjob when its done. I'm currious on that, can you buff it out ,if you didnt clear it? After I'm done wet sandin and its cured for a while I usually just put 2-3 coats a wax on.But I dont have clear on anything...That jd sure does look good !!Would you mind sharing how you buff it all out


Salatino,
On the 212 above, I didn't use any clear coat. After I left the paint cure for two weeks, as stated, I wet sanded one last time. Rinsed the parts off good with clean water, left dry for a couple of hours, and then started applying polishing compound. The polishing compound was basically applied by hand with a rag in a circular motion, counter clockwise, opposite the direction of my buffing wheel. Now here is where some guys think I'm wrong, but I allow the polishing compound to dry on the surface. I know the container tells you not to, but I have found better results in letting it dry to a film. After the compound has set, I take a clean rag over the parts to get off most of the compound, then go over everything again with the buffing wheel. Usually, one time is enough, especially on parts that won't be seen much. For fenders, hoods, grilles and frames, I usually go over them a second or sometimes a third time. Just keep one thing in mind. Polishing compound still has some abrasives in it, and the more you apply pressure, the more paint you could take off, so when applying your first initial coat, don't be to hard in applying pressure. You want some pressure, but don't try to run your hand through the part either!

After I'm done with the polishing compound, I finish up with at least three coats of wax. I use Maguires Deep Color Polish, and it seems to hold out very well, and gives very positive results. Again, I apply one coat, let it sit for about twenty minutes, wipe what I can with a clean rag, then go over it again with the buffer wheel. Sencond and third coats are applied the same way, buffed between each coat.

Hope this helps you out, and good luck with it! I'm really hoping that others will come along with some input, as I'm also looking for better techniques as well.
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#11 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 06:25 PM

Troy, Thanks for explaining how you do it.

I have several gt's mechanically restored, just haven't painted any in a very long time. I am getting ready to paint a few of these soon.
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#12 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 06:48 PM

All My restorations get sprayed with a HLPV spray Gun.
IMO a great paint job is 80% prep work.
Here's a few pics of some various paint jobs I have done over the last couple years. Generally after the primer and body work is complete I end up putting on 3 coats of paint on.

gb 021.JPG gb 008.JPG 01 010.JPG 01 011.JPG ek&versa weed cutter 011.JPG ek&versa weed cutter 012.JPG
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#13 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 07:00 PM

And now for the Hardest Restoration I have ever had to do, The Green Brier :DIt took hours and hours and hours of sanding, but as you an see I think it turned out pretty good for the condition it was in.GreenBrier 004.JPG green brier and EK deck primed 006.JPG green brier and EK deck primed 003.JPG green brier 3 coats 007.JPG

12.jpg 14.jpg 11.jpg
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#14 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 07:40 PM

I'm not sure, what's going on here, but when I click your links, I'm prompted to Sign in.
And then, nothing happens.

#15 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 07:42 PM

I'm not sure, what's going on here, but when I click your links, I'm prompted to Sign in.
And then, nothing happens.


Hmm.... Just got the same thing..... I'll have to look into this.
I tried to copy and paste the pics from a previous thread.




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