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Isulating Garage


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#1 tractorman604 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 07:27 AM

I have a 20x25 foot garage that needs to be insulated.What are your opinions for doing the ceiling and walls . Would you use pink or brown insul, or styrofoam ,sprayfoam,i haven't a clue what to use and really would love any input. Thank's

#2 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 07:40 AM

A few years ago, I found that the cheapest insulation was the rolled pink stuff. You would have to price compare to be sure. I actually did a sandwich, with the pink insulation, then put a layer of foam up, then put a layer of sheetrock over that to finish. It's in my attic, and with only one 6 inch duct it stays reasonably cool even during the heat of summer.

For your ceiling, I would use blown in cellulose product, make sure it is thick and even.

I just looked and saw, you are in Canada! Make sure you check your local building codes for recommended levels of insulation. You may find something at
http://www.certainte...lue_revised.pdf

that will help.

Edited by HowardsMF155, October 05, 2012 - 07:48 AM.

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#3 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 07:47 AM

R-15 roll-in for the walls, covered with a 4 or 6 mil plastic. I prefer a blown-in for the ceiling, usually try to get it up to R-38 or so. 15 inches, once it's settled. I use 6 mil for the ceiling.

What material were you thinking of for the wall and ceiling covering? Sheetrock is about the cheapest these days, by a long shot.
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#4 bhts OFFLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 09:00 AM

First thing is shop around to get the best price. The pink stuff at a R rating of 15-19 would be fine in the garage. If you are going to finish it with walls i used 1/2 inch OSB in mine. As for the ceiling i am doing that this weekend and was going to use blow in but after a little price comparison i went with rolls at a $300 savings for the same thing.I am putting in a R30 in the ceiling. It is getting that time of year so watch your local lumber stores as they should be runing sale from time to time. For the walls use a krafted mate style so you can staple it to the studes and a unfaced in the celing should be fine..
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#5 lyall ONLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 09:40 AM

first check for air leaks
I used several small cans of spray foam for the leak - then put up the batt insulation - then plastic sheeting - then drywall
stopping the air leaks help a lot
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#6 Bud OFFLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 09:59 AM

With blow in insulation, if it's an open area above that you may be accessing later (such as for wiring) you will need to add more blowin where you compressed the existing blow in. Also don't forget about the air flow needed in the celling no matter which type you use. Here where I live they use a R38 nim. and go as high as R60. Although seldom that high in a garage. A garage usually gets an R13 or R15 for 2x4 walls and R19 for 2x6. When work for an insulation company we would go the extra step and spray foam every hole that the wires and pipes ran through on outside walls.
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#7 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 10:50 AM

I am considering the same job but have so much stuff hanging and laying in the wall stud cavities that I don't know what I'd do with it all if I finished the walls. I would go FG batts in the walls and then blown in or FG in the ceiling. It's a nasty job to do the ceiling yourself but can save $. I was wondering if you can use anything other than drywall to finish the walls. It is cheap but it doesn't seem like it would stand up very well to abuse in a garage/shop. I need to check the building code on what is allowed.
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#8 tractorman604 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 01:39 PM

R-15 roll-in for the walls, covered with a 4 or 6 mil plastic. I prefer a blown-in for the ceiling, usually try to get it up to R-38 or so. 15 inches, once it's settled. I use 6 mil for the ceiling.

What material were you thinking of for the wall and ceiling covering? Sheetrock is about the cheapest these days, by a long shot.

I was thinking of using OSB

#9 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 03:41 PM

I have done a garage where we used plywood for the bottom 4 foot of the wall, and gypsum the rest of the way up. If you use OSB, paint or seal both sides of the bottom layer before you put it on the wall, if it contacts the floor.
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#10 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 05:35 PM

Whatever I use on a wall, I try to keep it about 1/2" off the floor some moisture doesn't wick up into it.
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#11 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2012 - 09:40 PM

A closed cell spray foam insulation would have the highest r-value per inch. It also is one of the or the highest in cost per r-value.
But spray foam has two distinct advantages over any other insulating system. Spray foam fills and seals and makes a wall or ceiling airtight. It also adds a certain amount of rigidity to the surface it is applied to.
We did our outside walls (2x4 studs), 3 inches (R-21 cavity),1/2 OSB, 1/2 Polyurethane board = about R-25 and airtight! Ceiling with blown in cellulose to R-50, dont remember how deep that was.
The more you spend on insulation the more you save on heating and cooling.
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#12 Team_Green OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 10:10 PM

Check your local building codes.. The next call NEEDS to be your insurance company. OSB is not a fire retardent.. My insurance company said NO flat out to OSB in a garage. I went R24 walls and r60 ceiling with 8mil plastic inside then drywall over that. Seal and tape every seam and crack. IF i could have i would have done spray foam but it's spendy.. BUT no need for the plastic or that messy black sealant.

I was thinking of using OSB


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#13 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 05:44 AM

I'm guessing the outside of your garage is finished but if not you might go the route I did with mine it had T-111 that was stained , I put 2" foam board house wrap then vinyl siding over it and just painted the inside of the T-111, Al
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#14 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 06:52 AM

Spray foam will give the best r-value and act as a vapour barrier. The problem is that it's expensive.

I do most of my insulating with fibreglass pink. It's easy to work with and pretty cheap.

Depending on when your garage was built and codes in your area, you might have 2x6 studs or 2x4 studs, and they might be either 24" on centre or 16" on centre. Just buy the insulation appropriate to the size and spacing...compacted insulation has no r-value. Also if you have to fill in small strips, make sure not to put it in sideways...it loses it's r-value that way too.

Once you have it up, put up a good vapour barrier. A lot of people like the seam tape to seal where the poly meets, but I like acoustic sealant better. It's messy, but putting a good bead on every stud gives you a better seal, and since it's non-hardening it will seal up around screws and nails when you hang your drywall.

I'd use pink fibreglass in the ceiling as well...at least two layers. Put the layers in across each other. Vapour barrier the ceiling the same as you would the walls.

For a final vapour barrier, consider using an oil paint instead of a latex when/if you paint the drywall. Oil paints provide an air and moisture proof seal, where latex paints allow air and moisture through.
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