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Invited Some Friends Over To Help Change The "yard" Some...


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#1 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2012 - 09:45 PM

Not sure this fits in this area, but I am so excited I had to share this with you all...The photos tell the story.SANY0002.JPG
These are the toys...
SANY0062.JPG
scuffing out the top soil...
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end of the day...
This is phase one of two ponds. This one is close enough to the house for fire protection (hopefully never needed) and as back up source of water for the cows. This summer was insanely expensive hauling water from town for the cows...

#2 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2012 - 09:57 PM

Please tell me you got to run some of those toys.

Nice looking pond, any plans to stock it with fish?

If close to the house, will your insurance give you a break on fire?
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#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2012 - 10:23 PM

Oh YEAH! Thats some serious toys! They will get some serious work done in a day.
ive been watching simular done on the 7 acres next to me. Did I MENTION i love to watch others work?
Out of curiosity whats the going rate per hour for a dozer in your area.
I overheard Byron Dammon(neighbor about a mile away) tell Jared(neighbor) the dozer was $185 per hour when he was bidding the job.
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#4 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2012 - 04:06 AM

Nice!
For fire protection, be sure to put in a "dry hydrant". Check with your local rural fire department and they should have info on the proper way to install it. Be sure to check with your home-owners insurance agent too, he may have inf too, and you will get a break on the premium!

Fire Protection in Rural Areas: Dry Hydrants for Ponds


AEX-422-98


Tom Lagucki
Karen Mancl


Tragic fires can occur anywhere, anytime. Having ready access to an ample supply of water is critical in an emergency. Large cities provide pressurized hydrants for use in fighting fires. In rural areas, however, small water systems may not have enough water in reserve to fight a fire. Private wells can seldom provide the necessary flow for firefighting. Ponds, streams, and even wastewater treatment lagoons can be considered as a source of water to combat a fire.

Dry hydrants provide an easy access to fill tank trucks regardless of weather. A dry hydrant is a non-pressurized, low-cost pipe system installed along the bank of a body of water. The top of the pipe extends above the ground next to a body of water and the bottom of the pipe extends down into the water. A minimum of two feet of water must be maintained over the bottom of the pipe to assure year-round water supply.

Hydrant Materials and Construction


The materials needed for a dry hydrant include: 6-inch (or larger) schedule 40 PVC pipe, hose connection compatible with local fire equipment, two 90-degree or 45-degree elbows, and a strainer with cap. The vertical dimension is the most limiting. Water cannot be lifted by suction greater than 20 feet. The hose connection must be positioned 2 feet from the ground so it is accessible year-round, even in snow. Therefore, the vertical length of pipe should extend down to a depth below frostline but no deeper than 18 feet. Less than 10 feet is preferred. The horizontal section of the pipe extends out from the bank and into the water, secured 2 feet up off the bottom to avoid clogging with mud. The pipe should be at least 2 feet below the anticipated water surface during low water conditions to assure enough water to fight a fire. The intake must be covered with a screen to keep debris out of the pipe.
Posted Image
Cost to install a hydrant vary with the length of pipe used along with the labor and equipment needed for excavation. To bring costs down, some groups provide the labor as a community service. The average cost of a dry hydrant ranges from $500 to $900.

Hydrant Location and Access


Easy access is critical during an emergency. The hydrant should be well marked and next to an all-weather road. Access to the hydrant must have a minimum width of 12 feet and a maximum grade of 8 percent. Place a sign next to the hydrant. Remember, the area may be wet or even icy when it is needed most, so consider placing gravel or other paving between the road and the hydrant.

Hydrant Maintenance


Dry hydrants require regular maintenance. Each hydrant should be inspected quarterly. Clear away any trees and underbrush that may make it difficult to locate or access the hydrant. Also check for aquatic plants or silt that could clog the screen. Backflush the hydrant quarterly and conduct a pump test. Regular inspections offer a great opportunity to train new fire department personnel. If a dry hydrant is located on private property, get written permission at the time of installation to access for inspections and emergencies.

The benefits of installing dry hydrants at bodies of water in and around a community include:

  • Reducing the time needed to fill tank trucks
  • Conservation of treated drinking water
  • Lower insurance premiums
  • Added fire protection
Plan ahead and install dry hydrants as new ponds are constructed. It is always simpler and cheaper to install a dry hydrant as the pond is being built.
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For More Information


National Fire Protection Association. Standard on Water Supplies for Suburban and Rural Fire Fighting. NFPA Standard 1231.

Natural Resources Conservation Service. Dry Hydrants-235. Ohio Engineering Standard #235.

This project is supported, in part, by the Ohio Small Community Environmental Infrastructure Group.

Another good site for info:

http://files.dnr.sta.../dryhydrant.pdf

Edited by KC9KAS, October 05, 2012 - 04:09 AM.

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#5 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 06, 2012 - 07:28 PM

Yep, I got to play along with them. They are on a "real job" less than a 1/2 mile up from me that ran into a snag (waiting for inspection)...so , since everything was going to set idol the boss said how 'bout $100 an hour and NO delivery fees. :dancingbanana:
They'll be back next week for to wrap this one up for me, hopefully I can be here then too. The job up the way they are getting from $170 to $225 depending on which machine and $150 each machine for delivery. Ten years ago I had some dozer work done and it was $100 an hour then, so I was more than happy !!

KC thanks for the dry hydrant info. ya saved me from having to go hunt an peck for it :thumbs: Seems that one of the local fire aux. groups actually will come around to help you put those in so that they have the correct hook-up and draw requirement for their trucks. I wanted this pond close to the buildings mostly for the fire issue...we lost some places not far away because of lack of water this last year, the trucks had to run several miles back and forth to a small lake for water. Nothing like you guys out west, but still loosing a place is loosing a place...The big pond over the hill will be for me to supplement the springs for watering the cows.

#6 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 06, 2012 - 07:34 PM

Oops, for got about the fish question, I for sure am planning to stock fish in the other pond.
But then again it seems before long there are always blue gill and small-mouth bass in about every pond around here whether you put them in or not. ( eggs on the birds feet?)
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#7 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted October 06, 2012 - 08:29 PM

Is the pond stream fed? How deep would it be? Are you thinking of stocking trout?

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 06, 2012 - 11:21 PM

Oops, for got about the fish question, I for sure am planning to stock fish in the other pond.
But then again it seems before long there are always blue gill and small-mouth bass in about every pond around here whether you put them in or not. ( eggs on the birds feet?)

WELL now that ain't bad! My favorite type of fishing is for Bluegill and Crappie with a light fly rod. It's my opinion if bluegill weighed 5lbs no one would bother with Bass.

Putting aside my prejudice, your best bet is to consult with DNR,Conservation, whatever they are called in your state. And find out what they reccomend.

#9 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2012 - 06:06 AM

Is the pond stream fed? How deep would it be? Are you thinking of stocking trout?

Both ponds have natural springs uphill from them, but not a stream. This pond should end up just around 12 ft at the over flow pipe in the dam. The streams are at the lower end of my place in the valley. They generally are only 6 -10 feet across and run a foot or so, a little deeper in the spring time ( more of a crick). Seems we need to go a couple hours further south into the Appalachians to get good trout streams from where I am at. I am at the very start of the Appalachians, sort of a rolling hills terrain with some hollows thrown in.

#10 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2012 - 06:15 AM

WELL now that ain't bad! My favorite type of fishing is for Bluegill and Crappie with a light fly rod. It's my opinion if bluegill weighed 5lbs no one would bother with Bass.

Putting aside my prejudice, your best bet is to consult with DNR,Conservation, whatever they are called in your state. And find out what they reccomend.

Ya, the pan fish are some of the scrappiest fighters, and when big enough they taste just fine. Sides kids just love learning how to fish on them. ( I'm supposed to be a first time grandpa this November :thumbs:) Here in Ohio it is the ODNR and I actually went to school with some of the boys over at the state fish hatcheries, so when the time comes I'm connected :dancingbanana:

#11 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2012 - 06:19 AM

They say you need about 15 Ft of depth, to keep the water cold enough, for stocked trout to survive the summer heat.
And of course, a source of oxygen. One of those small windmills, with an air pump on it work pretty good for that.

#12 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 03:26 PM

They say you need about 15 Ft of depth, to keep the water cold enough, for stocked trout to survive the summer heat.
And of course, a source of oxygen. One of those small windmills, with an air pump on it work pretty good for that.

Thanks for that info. I'll have to give this some more thought, especially before we re-do the other pond, it will be deeper and larger. This one probably will settle into around 12 feet so maybe a little short for trout




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