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Cold Bending Steel.


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#1 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2012 - 08:18 PM

I need to make a sleeve hitch. I need to bent a piece of flat stock and make it kind of u shaped. The ends will bolt to the axle. Do I have to heat it or can I just bend it in a vice?

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#2 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2012 - 08:22 PM

I bend things cold all the time, but those things are small and can be. It depends on how thick the steel is. If you bend it cold it may loose some strenght sometimes when bending cold steel it is hard to achieve a tight bend.

#3 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2012 - 08:34 PM

Tight and accurate in a vice is hard. I thought about using the press like a brake. 45* is the sharpest angle ill do.

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#4 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2012 - 08:37 PM

If you have a propane torch you should be able to achieve what you want.

#5 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2012 - 08:41 PM

Super easy with a torch heated bright red along the bend line. If more than 1/4" thick, it's kinda hard to do without heat or a press. You can however grind a groove half way through the bend line, bend in the vice, then weld the groove back in after getting the angle needed.
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#6 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 04:43 AM

No torch. The grind and re weld would work too.

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#7 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 07:59 AM

My theory has always been: if I can bend it while it is cold, it will bend under load. If you need it to hold shape under load, find something you can't bend while cold. If it isn't going to experience heavy loads, cold bending is fine. A sleeve hitch sound like the type of thing that will get some heavy use.

#8 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 08:40 AM

You put enough force you can cold bend just about anything. I think the grind and weld method may be my best option. I think it will give me the best strongest results.

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#9 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 09:28 AM

There is another option available for heat that isn't used much anymore but is very effective. Years ago the carbon arc torch was very popular and is an item that I still find useful. They are very effective for heating steel and it eliminates the need for a gas torch set. Check out the following video for more information.

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#10 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 10:02 AM

Very interesting. I have seen references to them but never seen one in action. Thanks for posting this.

#11 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 01:02 PM

Neat video thanks for sharing. Makes me want to go out and find one.
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#12 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 05:28 PM

Makes me want to go out and find one.


I may be wrong on this but I think that if you have an older oil burning furnace, you may have a carbon arc torch, or at least the making of a 110v ac version. I seem to remember the older furnaces as using a carbon arc system to ignite the oil. There was a high voltage transformer that powered the arc. May not be as large as the one in the video, but it would be something to start with.

#13 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 07:25 PM

I believe those ignitors use high voltage and very low amperage. I can't remember for sure but I'm thinking in the 10 to 15 amp. range. The amount of heat generated would be very limited at most. The fuel oil is introduced into the furnace as a fog which takes very little to ignite and thus a very clean burn. The ignitor elements in the furnace we had weren't much more than two wires with the tips spaced close together. Good thought though.
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#14 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 07:28 PM

...I seem to remember the older furnaces as using a carbon arc system to ignite the oil...


I used to work for an HVAC supplier and the electrodes that we sold were all an alloy metal. I'm not sure what the makeup of them was, but they were chrome looking with a big ceramic insulator.

I'm wondering if the rods in that video are the same as the ones that we use at work with the air arc cutter?
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#15 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 08:20 PM

Thanks for that video , I've seen those in the back of old magazine ads but never saw one in person nor being used. Al




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