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Store Generator Full Or Empty?


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23 replies to this topic

#16 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2012 - 04:22 PM

I would keep it full of fuel with some type of fuel stabilizer.....(don't want to start a stabilizer brand war)....If your engine is exposed to vairying temperatures, and the fuel tank is not full, you will get a lot of moisture (condensation) in your fuel....I agree, Damn ethenol!

#17 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2012 - 04:32 PM

Empty is the only sure way. I waited for a long time and found an old one with a multifuel setup. So my long term plan is to keep the gasoline tank empty and hook it up to house natural gas. I'd only run gasoline then if I want to take it somewhere or get the extra power from gasoline. They do make the multi-fuel kits for a lot of generators. You can also then just set it up for propane and leave a full tank with it ready to go.

#18 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2012 - 04:44 PM

I stored mine for about ten years empty and it only took 15 minutes to get it running two years ago during an week long outage.
With today's gas, even treated I wouldn't trust it longer than a few months.

#19 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2012 - 07:15 PM

I've found that the best way to put up a generator is to put Marvel Mystery Oil in the gas and and when you're done run the tank and carb completly dry. Then change the oil. Don't leave old oil in the engine because it is acidic. Never leave the crankcase dry because someone will "borrow" it and blow it up on you. The Marvel in the gas leaves a light oil coating in the fuel system and cylinder. To prevent a sticking exhaust valve, turn the engine by hand until compression builds that means both valves are closed. Put a tray of mouse poison under the generator and check it regularly. Seal the gas tank cap with a plastic bag to prevent moisture from entering. A cover is necessary if it is left outside but make sure there is ventilation or there will be condensation. Good Luck

#20 HydroHarold OFFLINE  

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Posted October 10, 2012 - 10:30 PM

"Put a tray of mouse poison under the generator and check it regularly."

Good advice. My mouse deterrent is home made. Cat box scoopin's in an open margerine tub. You won't smell it but the mice will, all winter. One treatment does the trick.
  • boyscout862 said thank you

#21 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2012 - 10:44 PM

sounds like good advice. Last fall I put stabil in all of my gas engines (like usual) however I had to leave my tiller and push mower covered but outside. With the tiller I put treatment in the gas and then ran it dry. Come spring the carb was so gummed up and corroded I couldn't do anything with it. Plus the needles were rusted... I had to put a new carb on it. My push mower on the other hand was was sitting right next to it and all I had to do was prime the bulb and it fired right up.

I like grumpy’s idea of storing a large quantity and cycling it through my vehicles. I also like Harold’s idea of running it with an actual load on it. I’ve read and heard many places that it’s best (like olcowhand said) if stored with fuel to keep them FULL. Makes sense if there is less air/wall surface for condensation to accumulate.

I think I will take the route of putting a drain cock in the fuel line and doing the store full w/stabilizer – run quarterly – drain remaining fuel and refill with fresh.

Edited by twostep, November 12, 2012 - 10:47 PM.


#22 RoosterLew OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2012 - 11:56 PM

Sta-bil comes in varieties.
The red is for storing fuel, like in your gen's. It is mainly to stop fuel from fouling and is not intended to counter the effects of ethanol.
The Yellow is for use regularly and treats ethanol issues. It helps with fuel fowling as well.
I prefer the Marine Sta-bil. It is formulated to treat ethanol, moisture and stop fuel from fouling.

The high octane ethanol level is different depending on what region your in or even what brand of fuel you buy.
The differences can be a lot. Some states actually have required minimum amounts of ethanol, some have maximum allowed amounts. Some require pumps to be labeled while others do not.
Your best bet, talk to and buy your fuel from a respectable and trust worthy dealer. Know what your buying!

As for claims of fuel stabilizers causing " gelling" , I can only speak for Sta-bil. There is nothing in any of the Sta-bil formulas that would cause that problem.

This topic is one that I am close to. As a racer and builder of performance small engines I deal with many fuel related issues. some of the junk that passes as an engine fuel today is amazing! Storage and fuel fouling is an ever increasing problem.

Ethanol does have its place as a legitimate engine fuel, but in your antique GT , generator or any engine not designed for its use is not that place!
  • ggsteve said thank you

#23 ggsteve OFFLINE  

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Posted November 13, 2012 - 05:16 PM

Sta-bil comes in varieties.
The red is for storing fuel, like in your gen's. It is mainly to stop fuel from fouling and is not intended to counter the effects of ethanol.
The Yellow is for use regularly and treats ethanol issues. It helps with fuel fowling as well.
I prefer the Marine Sta-bil. It is formulated to treat ethanol, moisture and stop fuel from fouling.

The high octane ethanol level is different depending on what region your in or even what brand of fuel you buy.
The differences can be a lot. Some states actually have required minimum amounts of ethanol, some have maximum allowed amounts. Some require pumps to be labeled while others do not.
Your best bet, talk to and buy your fuel from a respectable and trust worthy dealer. Know what your buying!

As for claims of fuel stabilizers causing " gelling" , I can only speak for Sta-bil. There is nothing in any of the Sta-bil formulas that would cause that problem.

This topic is one that I am close to. As a racer and builder of performance small engines I deal with many fuel related issues. some of the junk that passes as an engine fuel today is amazing! Storage and fuel fouling is an ever increasing problem.

Ethanol does have its place as a legitimate engine fuel, but in your antique GT , generator or any engine not designed for its use is not that place!


No choice here. All the gasoline has 10% ethanol in it. I use double strength red Stabil per the directions in every can of gas. I add a dollup of Seafoam for good measure. Have very few long-between-start problems since I started this. Before I used Stabil I had trouble with my snowblower and mower at the beginning of each season.

#24 HankS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2012 - 09:22 AM

I've had our generator for 10 years. Always store it with fuel in the tank with stabilizer in it. The cap on the tank has a vent that can be closed up so condensation isn't a big problem. It always starts first or 2nd pull. Running a gen set with a load once a month or so is a good idea. Putting a load on it generates heat inside the generator which dries out any condensation. Some generators, like the one in our motorhome have brushes. Running with a load helps clean off any corrosion before it builds up to the point where the gen set won't produce any electricity. The motorhome generator is an Onan and they recommend running it once a month for 30 minutes with at least a half load on it. I turn on some electric heaters or the roof air to put a good load on it.




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