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Power 4 My 3 Point


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#1 GTMike OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2012 - 05:10 PM

I want to make my 3 pt. hitch a power unit. I'm thinking a electric actuator with 8 " of stroke and 500lbs up and down force. Anyone here ever done this or something similar? I'm putting it on a 1995 917.258911 tractor. Any other ideas would be nice to hear as well. thanks.

#2 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2012 - 05:34 PM

Mike, First off, :welcometogttalk:

Second, are you building the whole thing from scratch, or are you starting with the basic ideas from the original Sears 3 point & adapting? Any pics of what you have in mind?

#3 GTMike OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2012 - 04:01 PM

Thanks 4 the welcome and reply. I have a Sears 3 pt. hitch and a plow i use to plow snow with. I'd like to have a way to power them both. I've seen it from other manufacturers, but not sure if Craftsman ever had that kind of set-up. Any help would come in real handy.

#4 Orangejulius OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 08:41 AM

Welcome. A few thoughts: One of my friends is disabled (paraplegic) and uses an electric wheel chair. The chair utilizes a screw type, electric actuator that has about 14” of movement and rated over 500lbs. This may be a good source for this type of actuator. From what I gather, every so many years he gets a new chair and the one he retires is usually at the end of its useful life. Instead of giving it to someone and potentially setting them up with problems (bad times when one of these break down and your out and about). he keeps a few parts and scraps the rest. You may be able to source actuators from local medical shops, second hand stores, ebay, and the like. His last retiree helped out a battle bots program.

These draw a fair amount of current, and if in somewhat frequent use, may tax the battery and leaving the charging system struggling. I would think about charging system upgrades, possibly adding a belt driven alternator, or running a deep cycle battery and charging it independently from the main.

Sounds like an awesome project! Good luck with it.
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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 09:31 AM

This will be cool. I think Sears had some electric lifts, but have no model # to check out with.

#6 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 09:33 AM

I done things with actuators some of you can only dream about. I used to build custom vehicles, tractors, and equipment for disabled people. Remember a 500 pound lift doesn't necessarily use a 500# actuator. Average draw is 10 amps. Use a breaker instead of a fuse when you wire it. A fuse will blow every time you max out the stroke, either extending or retracting. Don't use deep cells a regular battery is what you need.

Sent from my HTC One X



#7 Orangejulius OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 09:53 AM

I done things with actuators some of you can only dream about. I used to build custom vehicles, tractors, and equipment for disabled people. Remember a 500 pound lift doesn't necessarily use a 500# actuator. Average draw is 10 amps. Use a breaker instead of a fuse when you wire it. A fuse will blow every time you max out the stroke, either extending or retracting. Don't use deep cells a regular battery is what you need.

Sent from my HTC One X


Thanks for the clarification; nice to see practical knowledge... mine on the subject is strictly theoretical. Good point about the load rating, proper design of the system will utilize mechanical advantage (levers) and you can get away with lifting more than the rating quite easily.

#8 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 01:19 PM

The older Sears GTs had electric lift available. I have one on my GT 18, as does my mom. I recently spent several hours plowing a couple gardens for the winter... it didn't cause any problem with drawing down the battery.

I will try to get a model number off it when I get home and some pics. I also have a couple Sears manual lifts. There is a difference in the two lifts--the electric lift has the attachment levers on the left side of the tractor. Also has adjustable lift arms...

Regards,

US
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#9 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 07:12 AM

I found a model # for one with an electric lift: 917.254421. This is a 20 HP, 6 speed!




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