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Worn Tires... How?


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#1 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 05:11 PM

I'm sitting here on a beautiful evening, waiting to go to a band festival GRRRRR (my kid is a marching band geek as she will tell you) and I notice my Wheelhorse sitting there patiently waiting for its next chance to work and I noticed how nice the original tires look. Granted, it's a 2003 so they should look good. It did, however, get me to thinking about the many garden tractors I see with tires that are worn out and I wonder, how? We're not driving these things to work, probably rarely on the road. I just don't understand how the tires are getting that worn. My Pond is a 1954 and its been in our family since new (except for 11 years after dad traded it and I found it and bought it back). It still has the original front tires. The rears were replaced only because one had a tear in the side that couldn't be fixed (from the previous owner). The tread on them was fine. In fact, the only time I've ever had to replace tires on a garden tractor was when I aquired the tractor from someone else with worn tires. My Satoh is a 1977 with original tires and this tractor has seen a lot of road time. Can someone clue me in as to how these tires get worn to the point of almost being smooth?

#2 ckjakline ONLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 05:39 PM

Lots and lots of use.My 67 jd 110 that i have i bought from my parents neighbor.The front tires on the tractor are all but smooth.Every time i look at the tires it makes me wonder how many miles are on this thing.It makes you wonder.Doesn't it?

#3 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 05:44 PM

It depends on driving habits, weight load and distribution, and if stuff pressures are maintained. Rubbers were better back in the day as well. Weather is another issue.

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#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 05:51 PM

There's a ton of reasons tires will wear funny. Just like your car, but with less tread depth in most cases.

If the caster/camber or alignment is bad enough, the fronts will wear inside, outside, etc.

On the rears, I've seen the outsides worn out and the centers still pretty good. Decimate under inflation situation with lots of turning around on the driveway or the like.

#5 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 06:13 PM

A lot of it has to do with where they turn around too. If the driver makes a pass across the yard and drives out on the rough surface of the driveway and cranks it as hard as it will turn, the front tires take a lot of grinding.

#6 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 06:53 PM

I just bought a front tire for my MF GC2300 today I had to replace it even though it was only 5 yrs old with very little wear.The tire serperated it had almost a ballon on the one spot.Maybe due to it being used with the loader on lately.It surprised me to see that yesterday.Was told at the tire shop that if it was only 4 yrs old there would have been warrenty on the tire but not a five yr old tire.

#7 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 07:35 PM

This may explain.... don't flame the messinger :mad2:
Yes, that's me with the Beer :blush2:

Edited by larrybl, September 19, 2012 - 07:36 PM.


#8 Guest_rat88_*

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 07:41 PM

I thought there was a rule that you could only do a tug of war one handed and this confirms it. thats the way I have always done it

Edited by rat88, September 19, 2012 - 09:17 PM.


#9 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 08:13 PM

I thought there was a rule that you could only do a tug of war one handed and this confirms it. thats the I have always done it


:p Yep, but you do get josseled around a bit, Beer goes flat quick.

#10 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 09:42 PM

Well I guess I knew the answers when I was typing that but I just can't comprehend how it happens given the fact that my tractors get used A LOT with heavy loads, road use, tight turns and all that and my tires don't seem to wear to the point of needing replaced. I understand with the under/over inflation and front alignment if you will. I also agree that tires are not what they used to be, especially car tires. I don't know, it just struck me as strange today for some reason. Maybe I'm weird.

#11 Trav1s OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2012 - 02:25 PM

I often make turns on the concrete driveway or out on the street. Those surfaces make quick work of the soft compound used for LGT tires.

#12 HydroHarold ONLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2012 - 06:01 PM

JD GX335 @ 730hrs, changed out the original fronts while it was in the shop for a "transmission linkage damper". There was still tread sufficient for mowing, but I wanted the extra traction for plowing/snow blowing. I was glad to see the wear was almost even all the way across. I guess my alignment and tire pressures are in the correct range.

Most of my mowing is short straight runs and lots of turning, sometimes on the driveway or street, but I think tractor weight, type of grass and ground you roll over has most to do with how your tires wear. Areas of my place where there's little or no grass are a very gritty dry clay. When it gets in my eyes as dust it feels like grinding compound so it must be pretty hard on rubber too.

#13 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2012 - 07:34 PM

Ice is tough on the rubber too.
Snow plowing, and spinning alot, with chains on, can really do a number
on the drive tires.




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