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Got Any Safety Tips For Chop Saws Guys?


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29 replies to this topic

#16 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 08:11 AM

Step it up on the eye protection man! I lost one eye to "medical mystery", had no chance at all. I can tell you it is no fun to be the one-eyed man. I won't chance losing an eye to a preventable accident.


Kind of know where your coming from Howard. Though I have never known anything else, have been blind in the left eye since birth.
I wear safety glasses all the time i'm awake.

#17 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 09:44 AM

Thanks folks. Lot's of great info. and tips here. I'm pretty safety oriented, as it is pounded into us at work. I've mostly worked with wood working equipment which is why I wanted to ask you folks before trying the chop saw.

#18 Canawler OFFLINE  

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Posted September 21, 2012 - 09:32 PM

Being blind cause of stupidity would really suck..


My wife works for an eye doc. That happens way more than you would imagine. :(

#19 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted September 21, 2012 - 11:31 PM

Another thing that I don't like about the abrasive chop saws is the dust they create. This stuff is nasty and tends to float around the shop for long periods after cutting even small pieces. I installed an outlet on the outside of my shop just to eliminate that problem. I would suggest the proper dust mask be worn if your cutting or doing any type of abrasive grinding indoors.
There is always time to be safe.

#20 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2012 - 06:21 AM

Hook the garden hose to the chop saw.
stihl-TS-700-cut-off-saw-large.jpg

#21 NJKen OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2012 - 09:05 AM

This is a page from my new Milwaukee Dry-cut saw. It holds true for an abrasive saw.


I have the same dry cut Milwaukee 14" saw. I love it, no dust and nice clean cuts. I've had it for 4 or 5 years. The blades aren't cheap, but out last the abrasive type Xs 10 at least.

With any chop saw, clamp your material down, and don't force the blade !!

#22 Team_Green OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2012 - 06:19 PM

My wife works for an eye doc. That happens way more than you would imagine. :(


sad thing is.. I saw stupid crap happen every day up till a few years back.. I am so glad i am not in the oilfield any more.. 8LB sledge hammer on a 16LB pin, The fella running the hammer not wearing glasses or anyone else standing there..

#23 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2012 - 03:04 PM

Keep anything you don't want cut out of the cutting area.

#24 jhn9840 ONLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2012 - 02:40 AM

Those dry cut saws are the greatest. A buddy of mine found one at an estate sale for a fraction of what it is worth. After using it you never want to touch an abrasive chop saw again. If you have a cheap chop saw like HF or similar double check to make sure everything you put in the vise is tight and secure. Don't need a piece of metal to go sailing across the shop.

jhn9840
John

Edited by jhn9840, September 26, 2012 - 02:46 AM.


#25 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 27, 2012 - 10:57 AM

I plan on doing my cutting outside so the dust problem is not a big issue. I try to always wear a mask when grinding as well as ear and eye protection. The dry cut saws look like the way to go if you are doing a lot of cutting. It's hard to justify the investment for occasional use.

#26 darmahsd OFFLINE  

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Posted November 02, 2012 - 10:56 AM

I have a decent abrasive chop saw that I've been using without incedent for years. This thread has got me looking at
the carbide dry saws. The photos seem to show the only difference being the expensive carbide blade.
So, can I replace my abrasive blade with the carbide one, or are there other differences that would force me to buy
a complete saw?

#27 ol' stonebreaker ONLINE  

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Posted November 02, 2012 - 12:34 PM

I'm not sure, but I believe the cold cut turns slower.
Mike

#28 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 02, 2012 - 12:42 PM

I'm not sure, but I believe the cold cut turns slower.
Mike


That is correct. One would have to take into account your blade tip speeds to run a dry cut blade on an abrasive chop saw . Max RPM will be listed on the Carbide blade, and the abrasive ones as well. Saws made for abrasive steel cutting spin really fast...

Some of the arbors are different sizes too, to help minimize interchanging the two.

I have a dry cutting circular saw blade or two that are for a regular high RPM circular saws, made by Freud. They last a while.

Oh, and I like the protective glasses part of this thread, BTW!

Edited by marlboro180, November 02, 2012 - 12:46 PM.


#29 darmahsd OFFLINE  

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Posted November 02, 2012 - 06:09 PM

Thanks guys. Makes sense. Some sort of speed controller would take care of the RPM, but I'll bet you're right about
differences in arbor size so you can't just switch blades. Have to check that.

#30 Guest_gravely-power_*

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Posted November 02, 2012 - 06:12 PM

Thanks guys. Makes sense. Some sort of speed controller would take care of the RPM, but I'll bet you're right about
differences in arbor size so you can't just switch blades. Have to check that.


Speed controllers on AC motors rob tons of torque and invite commutator burn out,
  • marlboro180 said thank you




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