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1945 Lindeman Restoration-1


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#1 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 05:34 PM

Started on taking the crawler apart to get it down to where it can be painted.
The hood and gas tank have been removed.

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As I stated earlier, I didn't take photos of this back when I first built it so this is an excellent time to get photos of some of the modifications that I made to it.
In order to get the engine to warm up faster and to have better control of the engine temperature, I put a thermostat in the upper radiator pipe and put a water pump on it.
Here is a photo of the water pump and the connecting hoses.
It draws coolant from the bottom of the radiator and pumps it into the bottom of the engine.
Then it is pumped out thru the top radiator pipe and back into the top of the radiator.

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This is the pump from the outside.
The mounting bracket for the alternator fastens to the top of the pump.

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Here you can see the pump better with the alternator bracket removed.

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The water pump is off an old flathead 4-cylinder Jeep engine from back in the 50's.
I made up a housing out of aluminum for it to set in.

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With the water pump removed I could then take the radiator off.
The seat and the front track rollers are also taken off.

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Another modification that I made to this crawler was to put electric start on it.
I took a starter ring gear from a big Ford truck and mounted it behind the JD flywheel.
Then I mounted a small starter motor up on the top of the transmission.

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Here you can see the ring gear mounted behind the flywheel.

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The ring gear is bolted the flywheel in three places using counter sunk machine screws.

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I formed a guard to cover the ring gear and the starter gear out of a strip of sheet metal.
Here is the front of the guard.

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And how it looks from the back.

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Piece by piece, the crawler is getting stripped down.
I still need to remove the hydraulic tank from underneath the crawler.

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Link to other post


http://gardentractor...an-restoration/
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#2 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 07:32 PM

Looks like you are coming right along Ray. I like the ring gear bolted to the back of the flywheel like that for electric start, clever, as always.
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#3 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 08:12 PM

Very nice job on the upgrades you made there, Ray! Awesome starter guard.
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#4 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 10:39 AM

I got the hydraulic tank removed out from under the crawler.

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The tank cleaned up pretty good considering that it was bolted up under a working crawler for the last 34 years.

This hydraulic tank was a little bit of a challenge to design and build because there isn't a lot of room under the crawler and I didn't want the tank sticking down any more than it had to.
There are two cross-member supports that the track frames mount on.
The front one is straight across but the rear one dips down in the center to run under the transmission on the crawler and this is the lowest point on the crawler.

The bottom of the tank is even with the bottom of the lower part of the rear cross-member so the crawler hasn't lost any ground clearance.
The tank comes up in front of the front cross-member and wraps up around both sides of the engine and transmission at the rear of the tank.
It holds about 8 gallons of hydraulic fluid.
There is clearance underneath to get to the crankcase and engine oil filter.

Here is the front of the hydraulic tank.

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And the rear of the tank.

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Edited by jdcrawler, September 14, 2012 - 10:48 AM.

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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 10:57 AM

Wow. Challenge is right! Great job on that sucker!
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#6 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted September 15, 2012 - 07:22 AM

The hydraulic tank is made out of 1/8 inch thick steel so I had to cut the metal with a plasma cutter and I made up a die to fit in my hydraulic press to bend it.

Edited by jdcrawler, September 15, 2012 - 07:22 AM.

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#7 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 15, 2012 - 07:29 AM

Must be a LARGE press you have there! That thing is intricate, Ray! Great job on making it.
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#8 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted September 15, 2012 - 10:57 AM

That is a heck of a shape to build Ray, great job building it.
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#9 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted September 17, 2012 - 12:55 PM

Nice fab work all around. Questions; The Lindeman kit didn't come with a hydraulic tank? Also, how do the tractor start since they didn't have an electric starter?
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#10 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted September 17, 2012 - 02:51 PM

Questions; The Lindeman kit didn't come with a hydraulic tank? Also, how do the tractor start since they didn't have an electric starter?

Yes, you could get the hydraulic on a Lindeman.
A "tool bar" was available that mounted on the outside of the track frames.
They made a dozer blade that that mounted to the front of the tool bar.

The hydraulic tank was mounted on top of the transmission.
It had the hydraulic pump built into the bottom of the tank and the hydraulic valve was built into the back of the tank.
The only problem with the original hydraulic was that the engine drive clutch had to be engaged for the hydraulic to work.
Here you can see the tank mounted over the drive clutch and the tool bar with a blade on it.

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The Lindeman crawlers were hand started by spinning the flywheel the same as John Deere-B tractors were started.
Here you can see the flywheel on the engine and you had to reach over the track to spin the flywheel.

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The tool bar could also be mounted to the rear of the crawler for attaching plows or cultivator tines.
Here is a model of a Lindeman with the tool bar on the rear.

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My crawler did not have the hydraulic tank on it when I got it so I got a hydraulic pump that mounts on the engine behind the magneto.
This pump is working whenever the engine is running so it doesn't matter if the clutch is engaged or not.

Edited by jdcrawler, September 17, 2012 - 02:54 PM.

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#11 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted September 17, 2012 - 05:22 PM

How was the blade raised? Also it looks hard to SE, the push arms for the blade look to short to be ble to use. Most dozers I've seen the arms come back much farther. I ran a Dozer once that had short push arms and it was hard to get a level cut with it.
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#12 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted September 17, 2012 - 08:40 PM

How was the blade raised? Also it looks hard to SE, the push arms for the blade look to short to be ble to use. Most dozers I've seen the arms come back much farther. I ran a Dozer once that had short push arms and it was hard to get a level cut with it.

You can see a cable that is attached to a bracket on the side frame and goes down into the push arm.
There is a hydraulic cylinder in the end of the push arm that pushes the end of the cable forward causing the blade to raise up.

These crawlers weren't designed for the construction market.
They were sold mostly to farmers for working in orchards and around the farm so I don't think the short arms were much of a problem.
The blades were probably used more to push manure and silage than anything else.
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#13 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 02:11 PM

The new steering clutch friction disc arrived yesterday.

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I can drill out four disc at a time.
They are centered on one of the clutch plates and clamped in place.
Then one of the mounting holes is drilled thru all the friction disc.

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A machine screw and nut is fastened in that hole and the mounting hole directly opposite it is drilled all the way thru.

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With another machine screw in the 2ed hole, the friction plates are fastened to the clutch plate so I can drill down thru the rest of the mounting holes.

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After all the mounting holes are drilled in the friction disc, they are then all counter bored on one side.

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A friction disc is positioned on each side of a clutch plate and the rivets are pushed thru the mounting holes.
6-rivets are installed from one side and 6-are installed from the other side.
The opened end of each rivet is crimped in a rivet punch.

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The pin on the top of the rivet punch is hit with a hammer to set the rivet.
The end of that pin has a machined surface that rolls the end of the rivet over to form a flanged edge on the end of the rivet.

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Here is one of the steering clutch friction disc all finished.

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Edited by jdcrawler, September 19, 2012 - 02:17 PM.

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#14 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 05:42 PM

I admire you for your diligence in taking all these photos. It's fun to follow along. I had a couple of 1937 B's that were hand start so this is kind of close to home. Thanks
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#15 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 19, 2012 - 05:51 PM

Great stuff! this is the kind of work you don't get to see most of the time. Thanks for showing us how it's done!
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