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Welding Practice And First Repair


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#31 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 04:24 PM

I'm not using gas it's just a flux core welder. Keith, I hear you about the stickout. About 1/2" seemed to be working for me. Wire speed was too slow at first and I couldn't maintain a constant arc. It kept pulsating. I also noticed that it would really splatter if I got too much stickout. My helmet is a lincoln and seems to work well. I'm also using Lincoln wire. Dean, I saw the read glow and stopped a few times which does help. That fender pan was pretty thin although some of it was backed by a 1/8" piece.

You're on the right track. If the arc is cutting in and out, then you need to speed up the wire. If you can feel the wire being pushed into the steel, then you need to slow down. You're heat setting will affect that as well, because you have to feed the same size wire into a hotter arc faster.... If that makes any sense. So if you got it set up right at say (low-2) heat setting and then you feel you need to go hotter, like high -1, then you'll need to speed the wire up a bit, too.
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#32 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 07:38 PM

This is all good advice guys, thanks! I got the crooked repair welds undone on the 317 frame. It was a bear to get all the welds ground out. Took me over an hour. The bolt and angle bracket they used for filler took a lot of cutting and grinding. The access was just barely there with a 4 1/2 inch grinder. I had to use a hack saw to cut through the final spot. When it finally let go the bracket sprung back about 1/2 inch. I took measurements off the 314 frame which is the same. I see the problem. There is another piece that is twisted and if I straighten that it should line up fine. I looked at how the factory welded these brackets into the frame on the 314 and it's only done on one side. Whoever repaired this went way over board and welded every possible spot. Tomorrow I hope to get it welded up. I'll let you know how it goes!

#33 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 07:48 PM

Brian, besides the 4 1/2" grinder, I have an air powered one the takes 3" blades. It' will get into tighter spots, being a lot smaller. Good luck getting things back where they belong!
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#34 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 08:49 PM

Ya know ya got your mig set right when it sounds like your frying bacon in the skillet. :thumbs:

#35 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 17, 2012 - 11:04 AM

Got the brackets all striaght and welded them. There are pics here in my 317 thread. http://gardentractor...st/page__st__45

#36 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

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Posted September 17, 2012 - 01:54 PM

That looks real good. On the one weld, it looks like you had some burn through but then managed to get just one part to touch, and then "decided to quit while you were ahead". Well at that point, you could have done whatever you wanted to that seam. Sometimes you just got to dab a little material on like that, then let it cool for a few minutes before hitting it again. Just getting that little bit of welding buildup on the piece will give you enough meat then you can then go back and hit it real good.

So don't give up on a bad weld just because you burned through and then be happy with just managing to get a little ground back. That's the best time to hit it again.
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#37 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 17, 2012 - 05:37 PM

I actually welded that on the bottom all the way across. You can't see it from the angle of the picture which is taken side on. The frame is folded over there in a curve. I welded the front side then flipped it over and welded the bottom onto the curve of the frame. I then though I would fill it in all the way across but stopped after that one bit. I think I got it pretty secure. It's not really under a lot of stress. I think the tractor must have been rolled, as the steering column mounts to the plates that were bent and repaired. The steering wheel was replaced with a weird little chrome wheel. I asked why it was replaced but the guy I bought it from didn't know. Rolling it is pretty much the only way this damage could have happened.
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#38 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 18, 2012 - 06:16 AM

Maybe we need a 'TractorFax' thingy going like the cars:
Posted Image
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#39 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 18, 2012 - 08:02 AM

It's all part of the risk of buying a "well used" tractor I guess. I should have guessed that the wheel would only have been replaced if the original was broken.

#40 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

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Posted September 18, 2012 - 08:05 AM

I actually welded that on the bottom all the way across. You can't see it from the angle of the picture which is taken side on. The frame is folded over there in a curve. I welded the front side then flipped it over and welded the bottom onto the curve of the frame. I then though I would fill it in all the way across but stopped after that one bit. I think I got it pretty secure. It's not really under a lot of stress. I think the tractor must have been rolled, as the steering column mounts to the plates that were bent and repaired. The steering wheel was replaced with a weird little chrome wheel. I asked why it was replaced but the guy I bought it from didn't know. Rolling it is pretty much the only way this damage could have happened.


Gotcha. My point on welding was that if you got some thin stuff that's either already got a hole in it or going to burn through real easy, then hit the seam real quick with low heat leaving "beads" of weld around the seam. Then let it cool and come back and hit the beads with more heat to melt them down into a better weld. This method will leave kind of any ugly seam, so have the grinder ready if you want it to look decent.
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#41 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 18, 2012 - 08:13 AM

Thanks again for the helpful observations and tips. Next up is a battery tray using 1/8" angle for the sides and about .05 sheet for the bottom. I'm going to try the stitching technique. This is a nice little practice job for me.




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