Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Welding Practice And First Repair


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#16 caseguy OFFLINE  

caseguy

    Connoisseur of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 906
  • 1,624 Thanks
  • 5,600 posts
  • Location: Edinburg, PA

Posted September 12, 2012 - 09:09 PM

Those welds look pretty good for a first timer! Congrats on taking the leap Brian!
  • JDBrian said thank you

#17 Cvans ONLINE  

Cvans

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5412
  • 4,473 Thanks
  • 5,008 posts
  • Location: Eastern SD.

Posted September 12, 2012 - 09:12 PM

Your to be congratulated for doing as well as you are this early in the game. Looks to me like you might have a natural feel for welding. Nice to see so many interested in this craft.
  • JDBrian said thank you

#18 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

Michiganmobileman

    Old Tractor Addict

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5678
  • 1,235 Thanks
  • 1,842 posts
  • Location: Barryton, Michigan

Posted September 12, 2012 - 09:19 PM

Looks good! I think the key is practice practice practice.
  • JDBrian and twostep have said thanks

#19 dthomp17 ONLINE  

dthomp17

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2987
  • 494 Thanks
  • 411 posts
  • Location: Norcross Georgia

Posted September 12, 2012 - 09:33 PM

I agree that a welder is a must have if you plan to work on these tractors. My first experience with welding was a small 100 amp Century stick welder that a friend gave me. It took a while to learn how to strike and maintain an arc. I made and repaired quite a few things with the stick welder before I bought a Lincoln mig and the mig is definitely the way to go. My advice is just practice, practice, and more practice. The more welding you do, the better you'll get. Good luck.
  • JDBrian said thank you

#20 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted September 13, 2012 - 05:15 AM

Your to be congratulated for doing as well as you are this early in the game. Looks to me like you might have a natural feel for welding. Nice to see so many interested in this craft.


I've done a lot of soldering in the past on copper pipe as well as electronic work. My father is in the refrigeration business and as a boy I used to help him on installation jobs. He did all his soldering with an acetylene torch, silver solder and silfoss(sp). I think maybe this has helped me in getting started. There is a lot to learn and it is something I've wanted to do for a long time.

#21 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,445 Thanks
  • 6,611 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted September 13, 2012 - 05:53 AM

Not bad for your first time with your mig :thumbs: Looks a lot better then my first time lol . It looked like you really cleaned the welding area then after reading you soldered with you dad before it's no wonder :thumbs: I think getting the metal clean grease paint free ect is something some of us don't do good enough (that's me lol ) for a nice mig weld , You mentioned the auto darkening helment , those are great ! I also picked up a lens that attachets to the gun that I've used from time to time ( you don't use the helment then ), also can use it as a hand held . I wish I had a stick welder at home beside the mig , there are just some things that best left to them , Al

#22 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

skyrydr2

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5032
  • 3,404 Thanks
  • 3,155 posts
  • Location: Gardner, Massachusetts!

Posted September 13, 2012 - 06:21 AM

With flux core wire it will be very hard to stop spatter, especially with the wrong settings and less expensive wire ( Lincoln makes the best flux core for small shop use)
You want to "pull" flux core and solid wires with the gun pointing slightly back to the bead your laying and watch your puddle . It will tell you if you need to move faster or slow down. And most important a good helmet!! You need to see what your doing without blinding your self :)
  • JDBrian said thank you

#23 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

marlboro180
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10710
  • 634 Thanks
  • 954 posts
  • Location: SE WI

Posted September 13, 2012 - 06:55 AM

As has been mentioned , those welds don't look shabby at all for a noobie. Great thing to learn, and practice , practice, practice. Find some scrap, make it shiny, then build some yard art ( AKA more scrap, just heavier LOL)

Check this guy out if you have not already. Great vids and tutorials on his site.

http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/

Scroll down a touch for the MIG pages , settle in with a cup 'o joe, and enjoy.


As for the spatter, there are sprays available to coat the weld area and surrounding metal that will help keep the spatter from actually stcking everywhere.
Posted Image made by Weld Aid, it is sold for nozzles, but I use it on the work as well. :-)

Edited by marlboro180, September 13, 2012 - 06:59 AM.


#24 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

John@Reliable

    Procrastinators unite tomorrow

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 36
  • 1,295 Thanks
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location: Boston- Cape Cod MA

Posted September 13, 2012 - 07:17 AM

Now is the time of year that many local vo-tech type schools offer night classes on all kinds of things including welding. Great way to learn on the cheap, 3 hours of welding a week for 10 weeks and a lot of different materials to practice on :thumbs:

#25 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

skyrydr2

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5032
  • 3,404 Thanks
  • 3,155 posts
  • Location: Gardner, Massachusetts!

Posted September 13, 2012 - 07:35 AM

Too bad your not closer, in about 3 hours time I could have you acing a weld cert. Once you get the " stick out" correct you will cut almost all the spatter out and get great beads . This was the very first and most important thing to learn with the mig. As With stick welding this is absolutely critical to keeping the arc going and proper deposition.

#26 twostep OFFLINE  

twostep

    Rockstar

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10198
  • 1,850 Thanks
  • 2,476 posts
  • Location: Berea, KY

Posted September 13, 2012 - 10:16 AM

what is the saying... "if it slags, you should drag".

I started mig welding with flux core and DO NOT miss it. I now use 75/25 argon mix, creates such a cleaner weld. Of course I still keep spool of flux core handy in case I run out of gas and must get something repaired.

#27 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,698 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 13, 2012 - 01:26 PM

Nice job for your first weld. Yes, and auto darkening helmut makes a world of difference! I've used both, and learning to weld would have been so much easier with auto darkening. Great start!

#28 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

cookiemonster

    Village Idiot

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 6338
  • 406 Thanks
  • 1,274 posts
  • Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Posted September 13, 2012 - 01:49 PM

Dude, good job for a first timer. If your not worried about the look of the spatter where your welding, then it's all good - it doesn't mean you're doing anything wrong. If you have a wire wheel on angle grinder, it will take most spatter off, but just be careful about glasses, because it will send the spatter chunks flying at a pretty good rate of speed.

And don't worry about running the heat extremely low to avoid burn through. Your first welds look like they need some more heat. When the welds are highter in the center like that, that's what it usually means. It's better to avoid burn through by moving around. Weld hot enough so that it burns in, but experience will tell you how long you can go constantly at one seam before you risk burn through. You can usually see the area around the welder start to turn orange before burn-through happens (yes, even through the helmet). Ironically, it takes burning through several pieces before you can start to recognize the signals that it's going to happen.

Edited by cookiemonster, September 13, 2012 - 01:50 PM.

  • JDBrian said thank you

#29 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted September 13, 2012 - 03:08 PM

I'm not using gas it's just a flux core welder. Keith, I hear you about the stickout. About 1/2" seemed to be working for me. Wire speed was too slow at first and I couldn't maintain a constant arc. It kept pulsating. I also noticed that it would really splatter if I got too much stickout. My helmet is a lincoln and seems to work well. I'm also using Lincoln wire. Dean, I saw the read glow and stopped a few times which does help. That fender pan was pretty thin although some of it was backed by a 1/8" piece.

#30 Trav1s ONLINE  

Trav1s

    Got points?

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 5472
  • 2,602 Thanks
  • 3,750 posts
  • Location: Cedar Rapids, IA

Posted September 13, 2012 - 03:16 PM

Looks better than I can do. I want to learn the art of welding sooner than later.




Top