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1971 Case 444 Tractor


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#61 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 12:05 PM

Thanks Mjoe7 for your reply. Before I grab my sledge hammer (J/K) and persuade that post (see pics of the steel post above) to be straight, is there anyone out there that either agrees with or disagrees with Mjoe7.

What you said Mjoe7 makes sense, cause if the post were meant to be bent it would not have worn that bushing out unevenly. No offense intended, just looking for consensus before I alter the structure of the steel post......I will never get it back to what it should be once I get it straight.

Thanks.

#62 Mjoe7 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 01:10 PM

No problem. I'd do the same thing.
I did just run out to the shed and on all 3 of my blowers (all different years) the rod is straight, but the bracket and rod are welded on an angle. So straight rod but positioned on an angle if that makes sense.

#63 Mjoe7 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 01:15 PM

After careful evaluation of your pictures I think it looks ok. hmmm.

#64 mac102004 ONLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 05:15 PM

I don't know if this is any better for you or not.20121016_185103.jpg

#65 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 05:40 PM

Okay guys. I'll make everyone happy and start with "primer grey" :D
So, since my machine is a '71, will I be using a color that matches or doesn't match the frame or other attachments in the garage? Maybe I'm over thinking this.

Flambeau Red was the "other" but that was stopped in the late 60's early 70's, so the Power Red is the correct color for your tractor, P.S. instead of "gray primer" please use red primer :thumbs:

#66 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 07:10 PM

Mac & Mjoe7,

Thanks for the additional pics. Mac, it looks like we might have slightly different snowblowers; yours looks similar but our brackets are slightly different. Mjoe7, I've compared pics of the pulley angles and it looks like my setup is exactly like yours. Here are a few more pics of the post and the assembly put back together. I think for now I've settled on letting well enough alone.

I went looking for bushings today and have come up dry so far. I have a few more leads to track down. With new bushings it will straighten the pulley slightly.

Here are a few more pics from different angles that convinced me not to straighten the post. Thanks again Mac and Mjoe7.

2012-10-16 18.38.15.jpg

2012-10-16 18.39.15.jpg

2012-10-16 18.39.49.jpg

2012-10-16 18.48.52.jpg

2012-10-16 19.03.47.jpg

Edited by Moosetales, October 16, 2012 - 07:13 PM.


#67 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2012 - 07:27 PM

John,

And here I thought I knew everything until your post :wallbanging: I just did a search and found Red Primer.....along with much more than I could ever want to know. Here's an interesting list of primers that you all probably know all about but it was news to me:

Other Primers:

Self Etch Primer

It always used to be the case that self etch should be oversprayed with primer as soon as it's dry. If the paint is left overnight it can absorb moisture which weakens the bond to the steel panel. I believe this is the case with chromate based self etch but not phosphate based (but I could be wrong). Self etch shouldn't be applied over body sealant - I guess because it etches under the sealant and lifts up the edges.

High Build primer

High build primer forms a thick coat of paint that is suitable for sanding. It is not suitable for applying straight onto bare metal (it would flake off). Cellulose and 2 pack high build primers are commonly used in the UK. In the US it is common to use epoxy based primer.

Red Oxide/Red Lead

Red Oxide (otherwise known as red lead) was effective in the old days, and was famously used on the Forth railway bridge. The active ingredient was lead tetroxide which along with other lead paints could cause lead poisoning, and it has been withdrawn from use.
Red lead paints produced since the 1990s don't actually contain any lead. The red colour is just a pigment added by the marketing people to take advantage of public memory of real red lead primers.

Zinc Phosphate Primers

Primers that stick very well to bare metal tend to contain zinc phosphate these days. The zinc in the zinc-phosphate primers don't offer any galvanising protection - it's just there to bond to the metal which it does very effectively. Boat builders (and they are the ones to ask about rust prevention) tend to use it as a primer for the superstructure, but not for underwater.

Galvanising (Zinc Rich) Primers

For underwater protection boat builders will tend to use zinc primers. These will contain 90% zinc by weight and offer some degree of cold galvanising protection. They are available in epoxy or natural thinned. The natural thinned paint is said to be more effective, but it's adhesion is poor - it is important to sand blast the bare metal surface to provide a rough surface for the paint to bond to, otherwise it can be scraped off with a finger nail. Any exposed areas should be overcoated in anti-stonechip paint.
The mechanical properties of high zinc paint are poor, but it's anti-corrosion properties are very good.

Rust Neutralising Primers

Generally rust neutralising treatments for automotive work will contain phosphoric acid which reacts with exposed rust to create black iron phosphate which helps neutralise and seal in the top layer of rust. A good wire brush will help ensure the top layer is also the bottom layer, though a preparation such as sandblasting would get rid of the surface rust altogether and allow you to use one of the more effective primers.

Thanks John for planting the seed. Now let the fun of finding Red Primer begin. :D

Edited by Moosetales, October 16, 2012 - 07:28 PM.


#68 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 05:04 AM

Flambeau Red was the "other" but that was stopped in the late 60's early 70's, so the Power Red is the correct color for your tractor, P.S. instead of "gray primer" please use red primer :thumbs:


I've typically always used a grey "self-etching" primer for my bare metal work. I did some searching last night for "red" primer and came up with "Red Oxide" primer at Tractor Supply, a regular enamel based primer for rust resistance that is brown and some really expensive primers from a boat supply company that were brownish. Yes, I can be a literal guy sometimes, so did you mean find a primer tinted red (and if so where the heck do you buys yours?) or were to referring to something like the "Red Oxide" primer? Thanks.

#69 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 04:22 PM

Even in the backwoods of ME a wally world is close by :bigrofl: , or a Autozone / VIP. That is where I get mine if I'm using a spray bomb. It can make a difference as to what the finish color will look like. :thumbs:

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#70 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2012 - 08:36 PM

John,

You literally meant "red" tinted primer. Good to know. Since I've taken it down to bare metal I plan on using a "self-etching" primer so now I must find one that is red tinted. Thanks for the clarification.

Well, I pulled the solenoid and to pacify my curiosity I took it apart. Now sure what it's supposed to look like when it's working but this is what I found.

2012-10-17 20.22.35.jpg

2012-10-17 20.23.28.jpg

2012-10-17 20.24.23.jpg

2012-10-17 20.23.55.jpg

2012-10-17 20.24.37.jpg

While looking at the wiring diagram I found that one of the wires coming off of the solenoid is supposed to have an inline fuse. The wiring on my tractor has been updated, any idea if it's necessary or important to have that inline fuse somewhere in the wiring?

Thanks.

#71 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2012 - 06:14 AM

Here's a pic of the wiring diagram that shows the inline fuse; look at #22.

Attached File  pic with circle.tiff   5.05MB   34 downloads

Also, what do you all run for batteries in your GTs? I haven't found a specific battery type that is recommended for the 444 but the battery box and dash combined won't allow for too large of a battery. Currently (ha no pun intended) there is a smaller GT battery in it that is from '06 so I will be replacing it with something. Thanks for your feedback.

#72 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2012 - 07:03 AM

As long as all of the electrical connections are clean, tight, and the charging system is good a standard GT battery will work. I like to use a floating battery charger on my tractors that will sit for a while. Seems doing this increases battery life.

P.S. I would replace that solenoid, due to burnt lugs. The fuse will protect the wiring system from burning due to a short, cheap insurance :thumbs:
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#73 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2012 - 06:17 PM

HELP!!!!

I picked up a new solenoid today (intermittent NOT continuous) and hooked it up. I also picked up an inline fuse but haven't installed it as of yet. I connected the jumpers to the battery and the generator light came to life. The moment of truth.....I turned the key and NOTHING. I rechecked the connections, removed the ground (cleaned and re-attached) and tried firing her up again. I compared my wiring to the wiring diagram from the manual and everything was perfect. I checked the PTO safety switch and that appears to be all set. The drive lever was in neutral. So....here I sit. I am stumped. Any thoughts of what to check next?

#74 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2012 - 07:08 PM

So here is the list of suggestions thus far:


1) load testing the battery to see if that is good (the battery is not charging so I need a new one but I did hook up jumper cables and had full juice and still nothing worked)
2) take a look at the interlock switch (not sure what the interlock switch is so I'm not sure where to check and what to check)
3) and finish by looking at the starter solenoid (I replaced the started solenoid with a brand new intermittent solenoid from Napa)
4) check the ignition switch (Not sure exactly how to check the ignition switch but I'm willing to learn)
5) check the ground (I took the ground wire entirely off the tractor and wire brushed both ends as well as where it bolted onto the tractor)

#75 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2012 - 07:16 PM

Do you have the parts and owners manual per the serial # of tractor, and do you have a multimeter?




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