Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

As Paul Harvey Would Say....the Rest Of The Story


  • Please log in to reply
121 replies to this topic

#46 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 12, 2012 - 11:51 PM

Got to have some tractor pics.
015.JPG
Plowing with the 375. This was one of the last tractors I drove at the farm.
028.JPG
Here is the 240 sitting in the tractor shed.

016.JPG
More plowing with the 375.
014.JPG
Here we see Dad giving some last minute instructions to the driver. Yep, in Zambia, that is the driver side. Notice the diesel drums and the people. Dad made it clear that people were welcome to ride to town, but returning via the truck depended on them being at the pick up point on time.

Edited by HowardsMF155, September 12, 2012 - 11:55 PM.

  • daytime dave said thank you

#47 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 13, 2012 - 12:00 AM

018.JPG
Here is our little herd
020.JPG
This is how my wife fed a little calf that had lost it's mother.
017.JPG
This is how I feed that calf LOL.
  • daytime dave said thank you

#48 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 13, 2012 - 12:11 AM

021.JPG 022.JPG
"Yes, Virginia, there really is a Christmas in Africa"
025.JPG 030.JPG
Clear road ahead. Here are some scenery shots for you.
031.JPG
Here is Dad at one of our favorite activities, Breakfast at the Mumbi.
Every so often, we would get up early, put the farm chores on the back burner and head down to our little swimming hole, where Dad had built this little cooking station. We'd haul charcoal for cooking, enough food for a regiment, sausage, eggs, hashbrowns, bread for toasting, and all the fixings. It was a time to be family, work together, and best of all, drive either the motorcycle or the tractor down the road to the river.
  • daytime dave and MH81 have said thanks

#49 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 13, 2012 - 12:22 AM

And some true local color.024.JPG

Here is one of our local churches. My apologies, but I can no longer remember which one.
023.JPG

And here is a group of workers replacing the culvert pipe for our irrigation ditch. The old one was crumbling.019.JPG
  • daytime dave said thank you

#50 twostep OFFLINE  

twostep

    Rockstar

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10198
  • 1,850 Thanks
  • 2,476 posts
  • Location: Berea, KY

Posted September 13, 2012 - 09:29 AM

WOW, great pictures Howard! That MF 341 is a beast!
  • HowardsMF155 said thank you

#51 daytime dave OFFLINE  

daytime dave

    Live long and prosper

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 531
  • 4,485 Thanks
  • 6,353 posts
  • Location: Upstate NY

Posted September 13, 2012 - 11:23 AM

Howard, thanks for posting those great photographs. They make your stories leap out at us.
  • HowardsMF155 said thank you

#52 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 25, 2012 - 09:01 PM

Ok, we'll call this section "Transportation". You've seen a picture earlier of the truck we had at that time. We had some variation of that truck for many years, some better, some worse. It was a Mitsubishi Cantor, and Dad discovered that it worked best if the front leaf springs were re-enforced and strengthened. Otherwise, the springs would bottom out when hitting potholes and such. It turned out that this series of truck also used nearly the same Perkins diesel engine that our tractor used, so that was a major plus for maintenance items like oil and air filters.
014.JPG
Now, the major drawback to this truck is that the cab only seats 3, and our family had 5 people at that time (my oldest brother having gone off to college in the US.) I don't have any pictures, but two of us kids made many trips in the back of that truck to and from the capital 6 hours away. During the dry season, Dad would throw a foam mattress in the back, and my sister and I would stretch out and read or snooze in the sun while the wind whipped around us. The speed limit on the "interstate" was officially 100 Kph (63 mph) but the police enforcement was abysmal.
Now, I called it an interstate, but that just about sent me rolling onto the floor. Let me show you how speed limits were truly enforced.
canon 004.JPG
Roads weren't always kept in good repair, and at any point you could come around a corner and find one of these beauties waiting for you. While the potholes were bad enough, there were two other stretches of road that we travelled that developed some sort of rolling wave, but the pavement was intact. The first you knew about those was when the front of the truck started to bounce, and it quickly oscillated into a terrifying ride. Dad knew these places by heart, but on some of the occasions I drove by myself I got a quick education in when to slow down. I didn't throw anything out of the back of the truck, but once the load shifted and crushed something.
The vehicle shown above was our "family car". It was made by Volkswagon and was called a Kombi locally. It held 6-8 people easily, and did a good job hauling luggage.

I'll explain the pictures below later.

Attached Thumbnails

  • canon 009.JPG
  • canon 008.JPG

Edited by HowardsMF155, September 25, 2012 - 09:04 PM.


#53 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 25, 2012 - 09:22 PM

canon 008.JPG
Ok, so first we have our gratuitous tractor picture. It is being driven by one of the local people, a driver Dad hired. In the background, you can see the diesel fuel tank, I'm sure there are many here in the states just like that.
canon 009.JPG
Now this picture shows a lot. First, that is Dad on his Honda trail 110. His first motorcycle was a trail 90, that would be 90 cc. I think he bought it first because he envisioned using it to ride the trails into the bush to preach at churches. But that never worked out that I knew of, because he always took people with him when he visited the different churches, often it was his faimly, but when we didn't go there was always someone. I'm pretty sure that early on he would either take or have a translator on hand, and he would preach in English. As he grew more fluent in the language, he began to preach and teach in the local language, and eventually became quite fluent in the local dialect.
Anyway, it turned out the motorcycle was a great help in getting him around the farm and to and from the various projects. So when the Trail 90 was sold at the end of their first term, one of the things Dad shipped back overseas from the US was this Trail 110. Obviously, if there was a motorcycle available, it was inevitable that we kids would use it. And we did! Sometimes it was just for fun, sometimes it was for a purpose. There were certainly times when Dad was working with the tractor at a distance from the house, and I would take the motorcycle and fetch food and drink so he didn't have to stop and drive back and forth.
Some of the other interesting things in the background of that photo, you can see the two water tanks we used to provide water under pressure to our house. You can also see the tractor with the sprayer, we had rigged a fill hose from one of the towers to fill the sprayer with, that was much faster than driving down to the house and using a garden hose.
  • twostep said thank you

#54 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 25, 2012 - 09:38 PM

canon 007.JPG
I think I mentioned a grinding mill earlier. Here it is in operation. It is what is called a "hammer mill", where the same diesel engine that we used to generate power was belted to the mill to turn a set of rotary bars. The rotating bars would hammer the grain repeatedly until the pieces were small enough to pass through a sieve. When we arrived in the area, most of the grain was ground by hand. I'm sure I have a picture somewhere, just don't know where right now. Anyway, they used a mortar and pestle approach, and would spend quite some time grinding the grain. Once Dad got the grain mill in operation, people came from miles around to pay a small fee to get their grain ground. Sometimes, they even treated it as a holiday. This young woman certainly seems to have dressed in her finest.
canon 005.JPG
Now this next picture is so typically African. I have no idea how far this woman may have travelled, but I am sure she came from quite some distance. She has no wheelbarrow, and no bicycle, nor does she have a hand truck. So she puts her grain in a bundle, and balances it on her head! It is amazing what a Zambian woman can haul on her head. Baby care is not forgotten, you can see how baby has been tied to her back with a 'chitange' cloth, approximately 3 by 6 feet. While this child is awake and alert and wants to see what is going on, I have also seen the children cover their heads themselves so they can sleep while riding in this fashion.
canon 006.JPG
  • twostep said thank you

#55 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 25, 2012 - 10:44 PM

Once Upon A Time.....
I undertook a BIG TRIP. It all started with a girl, of course. Now, it wasn't as if I hadn't made this trip before, just never by myself. Or almost by myself, as I was accompanied? chapparoned? supervised? by a full time missionary from the Lusaka area who went with me. The plan was for me to take the truck:
014.JPG
and take a transformer down to South Africa for repair, then bring it back to Zambia, along with a LOT of other stuff. So off I went. On the first day, I traveled from Serenje to Lusaka, a reasonable 6 hour trip. On the second day, I traveled from Lusaka to Harare, Zimbabwe, somewhere between 8 and 10 hours. On the third day, I traveled from Harare, Zimbabwe, to Beitbridge South Africa, just across the border from Zimbabwe. And on the fourth day, I traveled from Beitbridge to Johnnesburg.
The big trip.jpg
I think I spent a week in Jo'burg, getting the transformer repaired, and getting the truck looked at also. Now, this truck had a problem, and I don't think it was ever fixed, but you could start it one day and it would run like a scalded cat, then you start it another day and it would run like it was dragging an anchor. Anyway, supposedly, the dealer "fixed' it, so I loaded everything on the shopping list, put a tarp over it and tied everything down. The truck was rated for 3 metric tons, about 6600 lbs, and I was somewhere close to that figure. Stuff was piled up two feet taller than the cab all the way to the back, and the repaired transformer was on the bottom.
Now, for the return trip, I went through Botswana, because Zimbabwe was very difficult to ship goods through. My deadline for the first day was to reach the Botswana border before it closed at 8 pm so that I could spend the night in Gabarone (HA-ber-on-e). I planned on leaving about noon, arriving at the border by 6 and reaching Gaberone by 9 or earlier. Instead of making a smooth exit from Jo'burg, however, I got lost and wasted over an hour just trying to leave the city. To make matters worse, this was a day when the truck decided to drop anchor, it just didn't want to accelerate, and wouldn't go fast at all. I finally found my way on to the correct road, and tried to hurry up. I was actually accelerating down a hill and had passed 90 kph for the first time all day when I looked over and saw a 60 kph sign! GRRRR. So I stopped accelerating and just coasted down the hill, went around a corner and Surpise! Police checkpoint!
As I said, I've been in South Africa before this trip, and never before have I seen a police checkpoint. In fact, the police have the attitude that speed limits are more of a suggestion than a law. But now, I'm headed straight for an officer with his hand up, with a full load, and I'm going faster than I should. I STOOD on the brakes, pressing for all I was worth, and I couldn't stop! Fortunately, the officer moved out of my way, and the truck continued on past him for a good 50 feet. He was mad! I backed up, and when he got to my window he unleashed a torrent of Afirikkans. I apologized in English, and tried my best to explain the situation, and that I was in a hurry to reach the border before it closed. I could just see him looking at my passport, looking at the sign on the truck, and deciding to let me go. He did, however instruct me to make sure I obeyed the speed limit for as long as I was in his country!
I made the border before it closed, and made it to my stop in Gaberone, but what a day!

Edited by HowardsMF155, September 25, 2012 - 11:34 PM.


#56 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted September 25, 2012 - 11:25 PM

The next leg of the trip was from Gaberone to Francistown. The most remarkable part of that drive is the fact that it is desert, and the road is extremely flat and extremely straight. The other peculiarity is, you can drink all day long as you travel, windows down with the hot desert air blasting at you, and nobody ever has to stop to pee.
From Francistown, the plan was to drive up to the border at Kazungula, spend the night, and cross the Zambezi river on the Kazungula Ferry the following day. When you enter the border at Kazungula, you are expected to drive to Livingstone to clear customs, declare what goods you are bringing into the country, and have the goods bonded to be processed in Lusaka. The plan was to do the crossing, drive to Livingstone, then on to Lusaka in one day. The day started well, and I arrived in Livingstone around 10 am and went to clear customs. It was about then that things started to go wrong. The customs people wanted me to go to Manika Freight to be bonded, so I did. I sat and filled out forms, and showed receipts, and finally was cleared by Manika Freight, so I took my clearance back to customs and waited in line again. Around 3 pm, I'm sitting in front of the officious little toad (This is how I think of him 26 years later) who is in charge of customs, and he looks at my paperwork and says "you will need to come back tomorrow so we can unload and inspect your truck".
I have to say, at this point, a red veil came across my vision, and my head pounded and throbbed, and I stood up, leaned my hands on his desk and tried VERY hard not to squeeze his neck until his head popped like a zit, and said "You want me to WHAT?"
He was adamant, though, that I had to return the following morning to have my truck inspected. I suppose in some ways, there are worse places to be stuck spending a night. I went and looked at the Victoria Falls (again, but always enjoyable to see) and stayed at the rather posh Intercontinental Hotel there. So, I enjoyed my forced stay.
The following morning, however I had resolved that since I couldn't squeeze the little toad's head like a zit, I would kill him with cooperation. I arrived early, had my tarp pulled off and had the ropes untied when he showed up. When he did, I handed him the manifest, then started handing him every heavy box I could put my hands on. I'm a fairly large, strong fellow, and he was nearly a foot shorter and probably lacked 50 lbs or more on me, plus as a desk jockey, he didn't really want to be handling this stuff. By the time we'd counted off 10 cases of cooking oil, he started asking if I could just show him specific items, so I dragged him up to the top of the load, a good 10 feet in the air, and it wasn't long before he looked at me and said "I can see you are an honest man, you can go." which is what SHOULD have happened the minute I was bonded by Manika Freight. I had the tarp back on and pulled away from the unloading area barely an hour after I arrived. I arrived in Lusaka that night and that was almost the end of that.
It turned out that we never paid any customs on that shipment. All the official paperwork got misplaced. Dad got my manifest, but no one ever wanted to see it, and so we let the matter drop.
  • MH81 and twostep have said thanks

#57 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,522 Thanks
  • 39,742 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted September 26, 2012 - 05:54 AM

Great stories! Thanks for sharing them! I can understand your impatience with the 'little toad'!
  • HowardsMF155 said thank you

#58 Roboter OFFLINE  

Roboter
  • New Member
  • Member No: 16971
  • 1 Thanks
  • 2 posts
  • Location: College Grove, TN

Posted December 06, 2012 - 08:00 PM

Hi Howardsmf155,

I have been contacted by Baptist Global Responce to go troubleshoot/fix the water turbine generator at Kalwa Farm.
Seems it hasn't been running for ten years. Any and all information you have about the Generator.... wire to the house..... what else the generator fed ect. any and all info. Right now I'm flying blind. I just started to reseach this generator. But all info is helpful, it helps me understand what the system was designed for.

Thanks for for help,
John
  • HowardsMF155 said thank you

#59 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted December 06, 2012 - 11:17 PM

I'll be glad to help any way I can. Are you still here in the States?
  • MH81 said thank you

#60 Roboter OFFLINE  

Roboter
  • New Member
  • Member No: 16971
  • 1 Thanks
  • 2 posts
  • Location: College Grove, TN

Posted December 08, 2012 - 11:50 AM

I'm in TN. We are in the process of planning the trip. I'm doing research on the generator. Any help would be great. Not only with the generator but the area.




Top